Dr. Heinz Lycklama :- Evolution’s Four Fatal Flaws

 

Lectures

  1. Nuclear Physicist Dr. Heinz Lycklama: Evolution’s Four Fatal Flaws
    Credit :- Northwest Creation Network
    Published On :- 2017-Jan-20th

    • Link  ( Added on 2017-Feb-20th )
    • Link ( Added on 2017-Feb-22nd )

 

Indepth

Nuclear Physicist Dr. Heinz Lycklama: Evolution’s Four Fatal Flaws

  1. Evolution’s Achilles Heels ( Book )
  2. Deterioration of the Genome
  3. Knowledge Systems
    • Science
      • Present
      • Repeatable
      • Observable
    • History
      • Past
      • Non-repeatable
      • Eyewitness Account
    • Belief
      • Past
      • Non-Repeatable
      • No Eyewitness Account
  4. Microevolution
    • All Observations involve sorting and loss of genetic information
    • We are not getting better over time, we are losing information
      • Our body is getting worse from generation to generation
  5. Fruit Flies
    • No progressive beneficial changes from simple to complex
    • No increase in quality/quantity of genetic information
  6. Evolution Benchmark
    • Organisms that are worse off than what we started with
    • No beneficial changes that resulted in a better off organism
    • Devolution
      • Devolving, not evolving

 

The Meaning of Evolution

themeaningofevolution

Knowledge System – Science / History / Believe

branches

Micro-Evolution Is Observed

microevolutionisobserved

Dobzhansky ‘s Fruit Flies

dobzhanskyfruitflies

Quote by Roger Lewin

quotebyrogerlevin

Giannis Antetokounmpo

NBA All Star 2017

Good to see that the NBA All Star list for 2017 has a whole lot of good guys on it.

nbaallstar2017

Homelessness

  1. Young, gifted, and Homelessness
    More than 100,000 students on U.S. youth, public school and college teams have no stable place to live. Sports Illustrated goes inside the lives of three teen athletes struggling to overcome the hardships of homelessness.
    Published On :- 2014-Oct-16th
    Link

 

Stories

Giannis Antetokounmpo: The Most Intriguing Point Guard In NBA History
Link

On the worst nights, when the fadeaways are short and the pocket passes are late, Giannis Antetokounmpo skips the showers. He storms out of the Bradley Center in full uniform, from home locker room to player parking lot, and hops into the black Explorer the local Ford dealer lent him. He turns right on North 4th Street in downtown Milwaukee, steers toward the Hoan Bridge and continues six miles south to the Catholic seminary in St. Francis, where the priests pray and the Bucks train and The Freak dispenses his rage. Alone, Antetokounmpo reenacts the game he just played, every shot he clanked and every read he missed. Sometimes, he leaves by 1 a.m. Other times, he stays until three, sweating through his white jersey for a second time. “I get so mad, and if I go right home, I’m afraid I’ll never get that anger out,” Antetokounmpo says. “This is how I get the anger away.”

He used to administer his form of self-flagellation on the court, because that’s what he saw Chris Paul do after a Clippers loss in L.A. But he noticed some fans lingering in the lower bowl with their cellphone cameras and he didn’t want anybody to think he was putting on a show. So he retreats, in space and time. Here he is not the $100 million man with the catchy nickname and the barrel chest who studies Magic Johnson’s fast breaks and Russell Westbrook’s mean mugs, who wrestles LeBron and mimes Dirk, who hears MVP chants and references 40-balls. Here he is not even the spring-loaded first-round pick who arrived wide-eyed in the United States three and a half years ago, tweeting breathlessly about his first smoothie, refusing to use the auto-pump feature on his gas nozzle because he was so excited to pump it himself, chirping after a burger at In-N-Out in Westwood Village: “This is America right here! The real America! Isn’t it beautiful?”

No, here he is the lanky hustler from Athens, peddling watches, sunglasses, toys and video games, on the streets near the Acropolis while his parents feared that police would demand their papers and deport them back to Africa. Much of his backstory has been told, how Charles and Veronica Antetokounmpo emigrated from Nigeria to Greece in 1991 for a better life, had four boys there, and bounced from one eviction notice to another. But the further Giannis gets from his childhood, the more it resonates, in different ways. “I can’t push it to the side,” Antetokounmpo explains. “I can’t say, ‘I’ve made it, I’m done with all that.’ I will always carry it with me. It’s where I learned to work like this.” He could sell all day, serenade tourists with Christmas carols at night, and return home without enough cash for dinner. Still, he laments, “The results were never guaranteed.” Therein he finds the biggest difference between his life then and now. “If I work here,” he says, “I get the results. That’s the greatest feeling ever for me.” It keeps him coming back to the gym—straight from the arena after losses, straight from the airport after road trips, straight from the bed after back-to-backs.

Antetokounmpo stands 6’ 11″, with legs so long opposing coaches constantly complain that he is traveling, until they review the tape. “He’s not,” says Wizards coach Scott Brooks. “It’s just that we’ve never seen somebody with a stride like this.” Among the NBA’s legion of stretchy giants, Kevin Durant is the scorer, Anthony Davis the slasher. Antetokounmpo is the creator, traversing half the court with four Sasquatch steps, surveying traffic like a big rig over smart cars. Durant and Davis try to play point guard. Antetokounmpo actually does it, dropping dimes over and around defenders’ heads, leading the Bucks in every major category; 23.8 points, 8.9 rebounds, 5.9 assists, 2.0 blocks and 2.0 steals. This season he will be the team’s first All-Star since Michael Redd in 2004, and before you learn to spell his surname, he will be much more.

Growing up, his customers occasionally mentioned his cartoonishly long limbs, but he shrugged. He didn’t need a 7’ 3″ wingspan. He needed a sucker to buy those knockoff shades. He viewed himself less as The Greek Freak than a Greek grinder. “I didn’t really look at my body and think about what it meant,” Antetokounmpo says. “I didn’t figure it out.” He glances down at his 12-inch hands, bigger than Kawhi Leonard’s, bigger than Wilt Chamberlain’s. He finally knows those names. “A lot of players will tell you, ‘When I was a kid, I watched Kobe Bryant, Michael Jordan, LeBron, Magic, and I wanted to be just like them,’ ” Antetokounmpo says. “For me it wasn’t like that at all.” He laughs, because at last he grasps the magnitude of his gifts and the ways they can be unleashed. He understands that a 22-year-old with his build and his drive should never go home hungry again.

Antetokounmpo lives in a modest three-story townhouse near Saint Francis de Sales Seminary, in the same complex as his parents. Like any hoop phenom, he subsists on Wingstop and NBA TV. But when he needs to steady himself amid his unimpeded ascent, he heads west to Omega restaurant, where 24 hours a day he can order gyros and lamb chops with sides of nostalgia and perspective. “I think about where I was four years ago, on the streets, and where I am today, able to take care of my kids and my grandkids and their grandkids,” Antetokounmpo marvels. “I’m not saying that in a cocky way or a disrespectful way. But it is a crazy story, isn’t it?”

On March 28, 2013, Bucks general manager John Hammond sat in a dining room at the Bradley Center before a game against the Lakers and explained why his team could not acquire a superstar. Hammond was in his fifth season, with a record of 181–206, never good enough to contend and never bad enough to tank. The stars he had brought to Milwaukee, if you can call them that, were Brandon Jennings, Monta Ellis, John Salmons and Carlos Delfino. Hammond outlined the two most obvious ways to land a prospective headliner: Finish on the fringe of the lottery and turn a lucky Ping-Pong ball into the first overall draft pick, which has about a 1.8% chance of occurring. Or pitch a premier free agent on a small market with a frigid climate and a mediocre roster, which comes with even steeper odds.

At the end of an otherwise dispiriting conversation, Hammond mentioned casually that he was leaving town the next day. “Where are you going?” I asked.

“Greece,” he said.

Memories of the trip have become blurred in the recounting: Antetokounmpo’s coach, idling outside the gym on a scooter, smoking a cigarette; Antetokounmpo’s teammates, nearly twice his age, coming straight to pregame warmups from their day jobs; Antetokounmpo’s parents, sitting high in the stands, as their beanstalk son deftly ran the point for Filathlitikos in the Greek second division. Hammond flashed back to a line that coach Larry Brown once told him. “For some people the game goes 110 miles per hour. For others, it goes 70.” Afterward Antetokounmpo’s Greek agents drove Hammond through Athens. “I don’t know what’s going to happen to this guy,” the GM said from the backseat. “But his life is about to change in a major way.”

The 18-year-old Antetokounmpo was no secret among scouts, but many organizations were scared to draft him, given that he couldn’t even score an invitation to the Nike Hoop Summit. But Hammond, desperate for that elusive star, was ready to take a risk. The Bucks picked Antetokounmpo 15th overall in 2013, recognizing that there is yet another way to secure a difference-maker: Steal him.

The day after the draft Antetokounmpo walked out of the elevator at The Pfister Hotel in downtown Milwaukee, where former Wisconsin senator and Bucks owner Herb Kohl was coincidentally sitting in the lobby coffee shop. Antetokounmpo was self-conscious about his broken English, but Kohl’s top lieutenant, JoAnne Anton, happened to be fluent in Greek. “I remember how his eyes lit up when he heard her voice,” Hammond recalls. “It was a small thing, but you couldn’t help but think, ‘Maybe this is meant to be.’”

So began an endearing affair between Antetokounmpo and Milwaukee. He moved into a two-and-a-half-bedroom apartment in St. Francis that he shared with his parents and younger brothers, Kostas and Alex. Bucks guard O.J. Mayo sent him a U-Haul filled with furniture. Caron Butler and Zaza Pachulia helped him pick out clothes for road trips. Hammond and assistant general manager David Morway taught him to drive, parallel parking on the seminary grounds, and assistant video coordinator Ross Geiger lent him his maroon Subaru Outback Legacy. Geiger was Antetokounmpo’s best friend in Milwaukee, the one who oversaw his graduation from EDM to hip-hop, and instructed him on which lyrics he could sing in public and which he could not. But when they ate dinner, even at McDonald’s, Antetokounmpo insisted on splitting the bill. Either he didn’t comprehend how much more he earned than a video guy, or he couldn’t bear to part with the cash.

Milwaukee went 15–67 in Antetokounmpo’s rookie season, which dampened his enthusiasm not a bit. He memorized lines from Coming to America and Next Friday. He learned to throw a football with Morway’s sons, Michael and Robbie. He begged teammates to play the shooting game two-for-a-dollar that he picked up from power forward John Henson. When a Greek TV station came to visit, he told Geiger they would need a customized handshake, “so we look like we know what we’re doing.” The Bucks were brutal, and The Greek Freak averaged only 6.8 points, a reserve small forward who spent most of his time marooned in the corner, probing for open spaces and put-back dunks. But he provided highlights and hope. “I love Milwaukee!” Antetokounmpo told teammates over lunch at the facility one day. “I’m going to be in Milwaukee 20 years! I’ll be here so long they’ll be sick of me!” He feared that somebody would wake him from his dream and send him home. “That they’d take it all away from me,” he says.

To Bucks vets, Antetokounmpo supplied comic relief during a dismal winter, but Geiger sensed he was capable of more. One night they were watching a game on television when Antetokounmpo shouted, “Whoa! Did you see that?” Geiger hit rewind. Antetokounmpo was always amazed he could rewind live TV. “There it is!” Antetokounmpo yelped. “Look at the action on the help side and how that opens up the whole play!” Another night Geiger invited him to dinner at a friend’s house and Antetokounmpo barely uttered a word. On the way home, he told Geiger, “You’re really close with Erik, but you’re not that close with Matt.”

“He was right,” Geiger says. “He knows how to read people and situations. That’s because of how he grew up. He couldn’t waste his time selling you something for five minutes if you weren’t going to buy. He had to read body language and move on.”

When Antetokounmpo reminisces about his rookie year, he sounds as if he is talking about another era and another person. “I was like a kid in the park, seeing all the cities, seeing LeBron and KD, having so much fun. But that kid—the kid with the smoothies—I’m not really that kid anymore.”


Pro sports age everybody. There was the night in his first season when Antetokounmpo’s agent at Octagon, Alex Saratsis, told him that a Bucks assistant coach believed he wasn’t working hard enough. “You can tell me I’m not playing well,” Antetokounmpo replied, tears in his eyes. “You can tell me I’m not doing the right things. But you cannot tell me this. I won’t accept it.” And there was the night in his second season when the Bucks’ new head coach, Jason Kidd, banned him from shooting three-pointers. “I want to shoot threes,” Antetokounmpo argued. “How can I not shoot threes?” Geiger left for the Suns. Morway went to the Jazz. Nate Wolters, Antetokounmpo’s best friend on the team, was waived. “I didn’t know all that would happen,” Antetokounmpo says. “You build these relationships, know these people, and then all of a sudden you get a text in the summer: ‘I’m not coming back.’ What? You get mad. You learn this is a business.”

The first time Kidd benched him, Antetokounmpo was irate. “I was like, ‘Let’s see what this guy did in his career, anyway,’ ” Antetokounmpo recounts, and called up Kidd’s bio on his phone. “I saw Rookie of the Year, NBA championship, USA Olympic gold medal, second in assists, fifth in made threes, blah, blah, blah. I was like, ‘Jesus freaking Christ, how can I compete with that? I better zip it.’ ”

At 6’ 4″, Kidd is one of the best point guards who ever lived. “But I wanted so badly to be 6’ 7″ or 6’ 8″,” Kidd says. “Guys like Magic are looking through a window that’s so high. They can make passes I could only dream about.” He detected enough playmaking ability from Antetokounmpo to try him at point guard in the 2014 summer league and again in the ’15 preseason, but he wasn’t satisfied with the results. Last Feb. 20 in Atlanta, with the Bucks 11 games under .500 and Michael Carter-Williams coming off the bench, Kidd put the ball in Antetokounmpo’s massive mitts. “We didn’t talk about it,” Kidd says. “We didn’t make a big deal out of it. There was no pressure. We just wanted to try something different.”

The Bucks won that night in double overtime as Antetokounmpo had 19 points and three assists, and afterward Kidd embarked on an audacious experiment: building the biggest point guard anybody can remember. Kidd oversees the project, but assistant coach Sean Sweeney runs it, accompanying Antetokounmpo to his midnight workouts, deconstructing his pick-and-rolls, furnishing him with clips of Magic but also less predictable influences such as Kiki Vandeweghe’s post moves and Shawn Kemp’s transition dunks. Antetokounmpo hung a photo of himself, facing up against the Raptors, in Sweeney’s office. Sweeney has repeatedly taken the picture down, but somehow, it always returns. “Don’t forget about me!” Antetokounmpo sings.

This summer they worked out twice a day for two-and-a-half weeks at Long Beach State’s Walter Pyramid, picking strangers out of the bleachers to fill fast breaks. “It was an inordinate amount of time going through situations,” Sweeney says. “We’d start with the running game. ‘First look is to the big running to the rim. Next look is up the side to the wing. Next look is across the side. Now can you get it and go full speed? Now you can get it and go and pitch it back to a trailer who can shoot?’ ”

“You know what I liked about using all those strangers?” Kidd adds. “He had to speak. You don’t know these people, but you have to tell them what to do. They’re looking at you for direction and you have to give it to them. That’s what a point guard does. He has to know his teammates better than they know themselves.”

The Bucks acquired Matthew Dellavedova in July and made him their de facto floor general, but Giannis is the one making the decisions and feeling the consequences. “If this guy gets the ball five times, I know he’s happy, and if that guy gets it once, I know he’s not,” Antetokounmpo groans. “So I’m like, ‘Oh, man, I’ve got to get that guy the ball.’ It’s hard to satisfy everybody.”

Actually, it’s impossible, which is another of the lessons Kidd is imparting. There are things stars do, like pick up the bill at McDonald’s, and things they don’t, like placate everyone in their presence. “To make the next step, I’ve learned you need a little cockiness inside you,” Antetokounmpo says. “I can be a little cocky.” As a rookie, he jawed with Carmelo Anthony. In his second season, he body checked Mike Dunleavy. But the Bucks have been seeing his snarl more often of late, after pep talks from Kobe Bryant last season and Kevin Garnett last month, as well as daily skull sessions with veteran Bucks guard Jason Terry. “I’ll tell him something at a timeout like, ‘Watch the curl, and if the curl isn’t there, the slip will be wide open,’ ” says Terry. “And he’ll always tell me, ‘I got you, bro.’ ” He searches for the slightest edge, because a highlight a night is not enough anymore. He needs 25/12/8 with a win. “I’ve definitely become more serious,” Antetokounmpo says. “I have a franchise on my shoulders.”

On 28-And-a-half acres around the Bradley Center, the Bucks are constructing a new practice facility that will open later this year and a new arena that will open next year. Next to the site is a billboard, featuring Antetokounmpo’s muscled back, over the slogan the future looks strong. Hammond, it turns out, proved himself wrong, and possibly twice. He found a star, and he might have snagged another, drafting forward Jabari Parker second in 2014. The Bucks currently sit seventh in the East, but outside of Cleveland, their long-term outlook is as bright as anybody’s.

Hammond and Antetokounmpo talk often, though no longer about the perils of right turns on red. “He’s trying to figure this whole thing out, what he’s going to be,” Hammond says. “We’re seeing this more focused side of him, but it’s a fine line. You still want to enjoy the game, the fun part of it.” His trust is difficult to earn. Private trainers with renowned NBA clients offer to work with Antetokounmpo every summer. He turns them all down, sticking with Bucks staffers.

“Because my parents were illegal, they couldn’t trust anybody,” Antetokounmpo says. “They were always nervous. A neighbor could be like, ‘These people are making too much noise, their children are making too much noise,’ and the cops could knock at our door and ask for our papers and that’s it. It’s that simple. So you’re always a little closed. I’m outgoing when I feel comfortable, but it took me 21 years just to invite a girl to meet my friends. I’m closed too.”

Around familiar faces, like his live-in girlfriend, his innocence is impossible to extinguish. When Saratsis mentions the All-Star Game, Antetokounmpo hushes him, so as not to jinx it. When Geiger visits, Antetokounmpo hands him the Wingstop menu, with the addendum, “I’m buying!” And when Kostas left home for the University of Dayton this fall, big brother drove six hours to move him into his dorm, stopping only at Wal-Mart. “Here is Giannis at midnight, with 80% of the freshman class, walking up and down the hallway carrying bedsheets,” recalls Dayton coach Archie Miller.

Giannis functions as the family patriarch, with his father adjusting to the United States and his older brother, Thanasis, playing in Spain. When Giannis inked his four-year, $100 million extension in September—after postponing the signing by four hours to accommodate a morning workout—he called Bucks co-owner Wes Edens at his hotel in Ireland. “I just wanted to say thank you for the money,” Antetokounmpo started. “It means so much to me and my family. I’m going to work very hard for it.” Then he offered to buy friends and family steak at the Capital Grille in Milwaukee for lunch. When the meat arrived, with appetizers and side dishes, Giannis looked alarmed. “I don’t know who’s paying for all this,” he cracked, “because I only said I’d get the steak.”

Three months later he walks into the practice gym the morning after a home-and-home with the Cavaliers, 76 minutes in close proximity to LeBron James. “You feel different after you play him,” Antetokounmpo reports. “Your legs, your body, you’re sore everywhere. Sometimes you have to lie to yourself, lie to your mother: ‘Yeah, I’m good, I’m good.’ ” The team has the day off. “But where else do I have to be?” he asks. He plays two-on-two. He shoots along the arc with Sweeney. Rookie Thon Maker mops the floor. Antetokounmpo’s three-point percentage, 29.3 this season, right around his career mark, is still the source of much consternation. Judging by his practice sessions, it will spike soon, and then there won’t be any way left to defend him. “When I’m coaching,” muses the 39-year-old Terry, “he’ll be pretty much unguardable.”

The next night, against Washington, Antetokounmpo starts the game with a reverse layup, a midrange pull-up, a pair of sweeping hooks and finger rolls. The Wizards can’t keep him out of the lane or off the free throw line. He dunks off a Eurostep, a lob, a back-cut and a put-back. He dunks over Kelly Oubre, Otto Porter and Markieff Morris, flexing as they wince. When Morris fouls him hard on a breakaway, Antetokounmpo sprints over to ask him about it. He has 24 points in the first half, Milwaukee has 73, and the Cream City Clash in Section 222 chant: “Can’t Stop Gian-nis!” He looks as long as Durant, as strong as Davis, as ferocious as Westbrook. He’s got Dirk’s fadeaway, with the right knee raised, and a nifty two-handed scoop all his own.

He finds Parker for a dunk and a layup, Henson for a layup, Dellavedova for a short J. Leading the break, he whips a pass to Terry in the corner for three. I got you, bro. In the post he backs down a trio of Wizards and kicks out to Malcolm Brogdon for another three. With 6:26 left he stands on the free throw line, and the locals break out a rare MVP chant. He has a career-high 39 points. He craves the 40-ball. He tries to settle himself, but the second free throw rims out, and Kidd calls him to the bench. The Bucks lead by 27, which will be their final margin. He winks at Alex, his youngest brother, behind the courtside seats.

In the locker room afterward, players scatter for Christmas, two days away. “Stay out of the gym!” swingman Tony Snell cautions, and Antetokounmpo surreptitiously shakes his head. “I don’t know,” he mutters. A few minutes later the black Explorer turns right on North 4th Street, toward the snow-covered bridge, taking the league’s most unlikely driver to a place only he can see.ic fever dream that is Giannis Antetokounmpo on a basketball court. Basketball fans now call him “The Greek Freak,” a name he’s fully earned with his play.

Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of Antetokounmpo’s dizzying skill-set is exemplified in those passes. At the end of last season, with the playoffs out of reach, Bucks coach Jason Kidd began experimentally playing the 6-foot-11 Antetokounmpo, who has the height of a center, at point guard.

The results were exhilarating for Bucks fans, and terrifying for the rest of the league. In the team’s final 26 games last season, Antetokounmpo registered five triple doubles, two more than any Bucks player had ever registered in a full season, according to Fox Sports Wisconsin. He averaged 18.8 points, 8.4 rebounds, 7.5 assists and 1.9 blocks per game — eye-popping numbers for any NBA player, let alone a 21-year-old who not long ago was playing in Greece’s second division.

But those days — like the days of wondering whether the family fridge would be full or empty — are now a world away.

“It’s a wonderful feeling. I can’t describe how excited I feel, you know,” Antetokounmpo told Sager on draft day in 2013. “It’s a dream come true.”

 

References

  1. Stories
    • Sam Liard :- Marshable.Com
      • The NBA’s newest $100 million man is someone whose story you can’t help but love
        Link
    • Associated Press
      • Greek federation: Remarks ‘racist’
        Link
    • The Undefeated
      • Marc J. Spears
        • Giannis Antetokounmpo’s first NBA All-Star appearance is just the first step in a promising career
          Link
    • Adam Paris :- Brew Hoop.com
      • On The Rise: A Tale of Two NBA Cities
        The Philadelphia 76ers and Milwaukee Bucks might seem to have little in common, but there’s more similarities than meets the eye.
        Link
  2. Interview
    • The Greek Freak Is Back For Round Two: The Cusp
      Link
    • The Starters: When “Greek Meets Freak”
      Link
  3. NBA Players
    • NBA Players on Giannis Antetokounmpo
      Link
  4. Dunk Contest
    • 2015
      • Thanasis Antetokounmpo dunks over brother Giannis
        Link
      • Giannis Antetokounmpo Top 10 Dunks Of His Career!
        Link

Father Ripperger – Discerning Apparitions ( Discerning of Spirits )

Videos

Father Ripperger teaches:

  1. How do we discern spirits? What about apparitions?
    Published On :- 2016-July-24th
    Added On:- 2017-Feb-16th
    Link

 

Indepth

How do we discern spirits? What about apparitions?

  1. Private Revelations
  2. Criteria for judging whether something is authentic
    • Judging authenticity
    • Why care
      • Demons can cause certain things to happen
    • Prudential considerations about certain apparitions
  3. Church was given Charisma
    • All Power has been given me
      • Go out and
        • …When they saw Him, they worshiped Him, but some doubted.
          Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to Me.
          Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,…
          ( Matthew 28:18 )

          • Baptize all Nations
      • Pentecost
      • Church & Apostles
        • Discern Spirit
  4. Most people who claim to have faith do not have it
  5. Those who have it
    • Met lady
      • Never claimed
      • Knew where deamon located
      • Their names
      • And, how to get it out
  6. Acquired Knowledge of discernment
  7. Can not be base on your emotions
    • Demons have access to
      • Your Emotion
      • Your Memory
      • Your Mind
        • Associate
      • Feelings
      • False Information
  8. Church gift of discernment
  9. The actual person or position with discernment authority
    • Pope
    • But, he has granted to the local Bishop
    • Bishop can be overridden by Pope’s agreeing to look into it
  10. Criteria
    • False
      • If it is contrary to Objective Catholic Doctrine
        • God will not contract itself
      • If it is contrary to Theologian
        • Council of Theologians
          • 800 Century
        • If not followed, you are likely to fall into error
      • If some if false, some of the Revelation may still be true
    • Grace
      • God gives grace to record and report it with full accuracy
    • Fact that a Prophecy is fulfilled does not mean that the Prophecy is from God
      • Demons can get in the middle and realize where things are headed
      • And, pass it along
    • Revelations containing curious or useless matters can be interpreted as not necessarily divine
      • If they are getting involved in things that has no impact on people’s salvation, then one knows that is likely not the case
    • Detailed, lengthy
      • Positive
        • Our lady has the virtue of silence
        • All authentic apparitions are concise
        • Brief, clear, and precise
        • Can not be interpreted
        • Must be formal and precise
      • Negative
        • All lengthy are diabolic or human
    • Person giving the Revelation
      • If the person is humble, well balanced
    • Person receiving the Revelation
      • Examined carefully
        • Temperament and well balanced
        • Not giving to excessive motifications
  11.  Communism
    • Violates Subsidiarity
      • Subsidiarity is an organizing principle that matters ought to be handled by the smallest, lowest or least centralized competent authority.
        Political decisions should be taken at a local level if possible, rather than by a central authority.
        Link
  12. Public Revelation
    • Publication Revelation passed when the last Apostle passed
  13. Possession
    • Womb?
      • In the 1800s in Southern Italy, many people became possessed in the womb

Sensus Fidelium

Prelude

A few weeks ago, I stumbled upon a set of videos published via YouTube by Sensus Fidelium.

 

Sensus Fidelium

Wikipedia
Sensus fidei (sense of the faith), also called sensus fidelium (sense of the faithful) when exercised by the body of the faithful as a whole, is “the supernatural appreciation of faith on the part of the whole people, when, from the bishops to the last of the faithful, they manifest a universal consent in matters of faith and morals“.

Quoting the document Lumen gentium of the Second Vatican Council, the Catechism of the Catholic Church adds: “By this appreciation of the faith, aroused and sustained by the Spirit of truth, the People of God, guided by the sacred teaching authority (Magisterium),… receives… the faith, once for all delivered to the saints… the People unfailingly adheres to this faith, penetrates it more deeply with right judgment, and applies it more fully in daily life.

The terms sensus fidei fidelium (sense of the faith on the part of the faithful) and sensus fidei fidelis (sense of the faith on the part of an individual member of the faithful) are also used.

Videos

  1. End Times According to Robert Bellarmine
    Sermon on St Bellermine’s teaching of the end times. Who & what is the anti-Christ? Where will he come from? What armies will fight the faithful? What will the anti-Christ do? Who stands against him? What happens when the anti-Christ tries to re-create the ascension? 
    Link
  2. Discerning of Spirits
    St Ignatius of Loyola teaches us how to discern spirits that are in our lives. We look at St Augustine for an example of this.
    Published On: – 2017-Jan-11th
    Link
  3. Discerning Apparitions ~ Fr Ripperger
    How do we discern spirits? What about apparitions? What do we do? For more please visit http://www.sentrad.org & remember to say 3 Hail Marys for the priest
    Published on :-2016-July-24th
    Link
  4. How Do I Know If I Am Going To Heaven?
    Powerful, and positive message about the beauty of God’s standard for our happiness. The story of Rudolf Hoess
    Published On: – 2017-Feb-5th
    Added On: 2017-Feb-19th
    Link

 

Indepth

End Times According to Robert Bellarmine

  1. Absolute Signs of end times by Saint Bellarmine
    1. Gospel preached all over the world
    2. And, Roman Empire terminated
  2. AC  manifestation hindered by
    • Political Might of the heathen Roman Empire
    • Lifted up and spiritualized by the Spiritual Power of the Church piercing through the Roman Empire and becoming Christendom
  3.  Society
    • Only two types of societies
      • Natural Society
        • With a political order which does not reference Lord’s incarnation
        • Once that society accepts those who do not live according to God’s commandments
          • That society drops to the level of those ruled by man’s nature
          • Foretold of the Post-Christian Period
      • And, another
        • Faithful to teaching of the Catholic Church
  4. AC  period can not come
    • Until the great apostasy
      • The falling away
    • No longer will the nations have unified faith of Lord and Order
      • Once the countries have left their unity with the Holy Father and the true faith
  5. The Man of Sin
    • The man of sin or so called AC will become manifest
  6. The AC coming for the Jews
    • Just as Christ first came to the Jews
    • And, then to the Gentiles
    • So will the AntiChrist
  7. AC will embody the Devil
  8. Time
    • The power which has hindered the development of the lawless one cannot simply be taken away by the AC
    • As that power is Divine
    • And, so it will have to wait till the appointed time
  9. The Power of the Roman Church
    • Shall transition into democracy
    • The gentile nation will reject Catholicism
    • leave the power of true God and return to paganism
  10. AC
    • Coming for the Jews
      • Another will come in his own name and you will not reject him
      • Born of Jewish stock
      • Just like Christ first came to the jews and later he joined the gentiles to himself, so will it be when the AC comes
      • The AC will come to the Jews who are awaiting him
      • And, then one after the other, he will subject the gentiles to himself
    • Will first come to those who are waiting to receive him
  11. Preaching of Enoch & Elijah
    • These two prophets
    • Enoch to Gentiles
    • Elijah to Jews
      • Jews will convert
    • Enoch and Elijah
      • Oppose the AC
      • Conserve the Jew
    • Restore all things
    • Elijah & Enoch will be killed
      • Revelations 11
      • 260 days clothed in Sackcloth
  12. Attacked Church
    • All evil men will get together and with open authority attack men in the Church
    • Hearts outside church, but body in Church
  13. Sit of AC?
    • As to the sit of AC, where will he rule
    • Saint Paul said that the AC will take upon the sit of God and claim to be God
    • Saint Robert
      • Rome
    • Jerome?
      • Jerusalem
        • Temple of Solomon, Temple of David
    • Saint Robert
      • Rome
        • Saint Peter
          • Apostolic See
    • None of the early Christian fathers use the word Temple for Christian Churches
  14. Prophecy is only fully understood in its fulfillment

 

Loyal Rue – IN LIGHT OF SCIENCE, LET’S BEGIN ANEW WITH A ‘NOBLE LIE’, PHILOSOPHER SAYS

Loyal Rue

Loyal Rue is a philosopher who is questioning the Christian Worldview based on new revelations that is arising from Science.

I first became aware of Mr. Rue and his views based on listening to Ravi Zacharias and others from RZIM.

 

Noble Lie

George W. Cornell, AP religion writer
Published On 2001-Jan-20th
Link


Religious philosopher Loyal D. Rue says modern culture urgently needs a “noble lie” – a myth that links the moral teachings of religion with the scientific facts of life.

He said science “has eroded the plausibility of the Judeo-Christian myths. It has got into our heads and consciousness in such a way that the traditional myths can’t be swallowed.”The myths, he said, include archaic views of the universe; a presumption that humans are at the center of existence; and the stories of Jesus’ resurrection and of Moses bringing God’s Ten Commandments down from a mountain.

Dispel the myths of religion, he said, and all that is left is nihilism, which considers life and the universe meaningless.

“Nihilism is not something that can be argued away. . . . ,” he said. “I assume it’s true. But it is ultimately destructive,” a “monstrous truth.”

The myths served as a framework for religious teachings that brought about man’s betterment, Rue says. Without their “integration of cosmology and morality” – of cosmic facts with idealism – people will deny fixed standards and do whatever they choose, splintering society.

Or, they might embrace the “totalitarian option,” which relies on government to force humans to behave, he said.

Rue, 46, a professor of religion and philosophy at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, presented his thesis at a recent symposium of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington.

A churchgoing but skeptical Lutheran, Rue suggests that we start all over, and create a new myth – a “noble lie” that squares with what is known scientifically, something that is convincing though it may not be factual.

What would that lie be? He doesn’t specify. “It remains for the artists, the poets, the novelists, the musicians, the filmmakers, the tricksters and the masters of illusion to winch us toward our salvation by seducing us into an embrace with a noble lie,” he told the scientific meeting.

Perhaps, he said in an interview, it is possible to rework, transpose and rephrase the Judeo-Christian tradition to make it plausible again.

In any case, the illusion must be “so imaginative and so compelling that it can’t be resisted,” so “beautiful and satisfying” that all would feel they have to accept it, he told the meeting.

“What I mean by the noble lie is one that deceives us, tricks us, compels us beyond self-interest, beyond ego, beyond family, nation, race . . . that will deceive us into the view that our moral discourse must serve the interests not only of ourselves and each other, but those of the earth as well.”

He said this lie would present a “universe that is infused with value. And such a universe is ultimately, I think, a great fiction. The universe just is. But a noble lie attributes objective value to it.”

He said “the great irony of our moment in history” is that what “we have most deeply feared” – being deceived – “is the ultimate source of our salvation from psychological and social chaos.”

He said “a good lie, a noble lie, is one that can’t be shown to be a lie by exposing it to a known truth or to science.”

“We need a kind of myth, a story, a vision of universality, that will get us pulling together, not just as Americans, but that will make us one, and give us solidarity of purpose,” he said.

“It must be a lie that inspires us to give up selfish interests in the service of noble ideals. . . . ” he said. “Without some kind of shared orientation, we can’t cooperate and can’t have a coherent society.”

“Without such lies we cannot live,” he said.

 

Interviews

  1. Loyal Rue pt 1: “Amythia” (interviewed by Barlow and Dowd)
    Loyal Rue, professor emeritus of Luther College in Decorah Iowa, wrote his first book, Amythia, in 1989. In 2014, Connie Barlow and Michael Dowd conversed with Loyal about his book and the malady of modernism, amythia.
    Date Published :- 2014-August-22nd
    Link

 

Indepth

Loyal Rue pt 1: “Amythia” (interviewed by Barlow and Dowd)

  1. Many religious people are seeing their Children leave the Church and what Amythia offers is one of the ways to accommodate what is attractive to these young people and what is unattractive in staying in traditional Churches; while also emphasizing that staying in Church and de-emphasis the problematic areas
  2. My thinking is changed about the Church
    • There has to be a new story, yet
      • It has to have continuity with the past
      • It has to be plausible
      • Intelligible, it could not be embarrassing to an Intelligent Being
  3. Tried to give an art to the new Story
    • The distinctiveness was the covenant
    • And, the plausibility is the Scientific World View
  4. But, the problem
    • Is that you have a myth that is embedded in a Cosmetology that is unbelievable
  5. And, the bigger problem became
    • How does one leave behind a cosmology that is becoming increasingly unbelievable
    • But, bring along the myth that was constructed upon the old cosmetology
  6. Customology together with humanity
  7. Michael Down – The Road Ahead
    • Take “BIG HISTORY” and trying to see how to “wrest” that destiny unto a naturalistic World View
      • Rather than wait to be saved by Cosmo Element
      • Taking hold of Saving the Planet
    • Covenant
      • Covenant becomes our covenant with Reality
    • Serving/Saving
      • Saving the Future
      • Serving becomes saving the Planet
    • If the Church will have any future
      • It will be the second coming of Christ
      • It will not be waiting on Christ
    • It will have to take responsibility
    • The Story of the Gospel is so hugely invested in Western Culture to just trash the whole thing
    • And, found that they just have to re-interpreted in a Science and in an Inspiring Way
  8. Loyal Rue
    • And, that is not too difficult to do
    • If you think about what the covenant is
    • If you think about the Hebraic Covenant
      • Most people will say that is the 616 laws
    • But, if you abstract it and say that it simply dictates if you follow these rules, you will live
    • And, so when will being that into the 21st Century we will see that it translates to our responsibility to
      • Global Warming – Take care of the environment
      • Address lack of Water
    • If Humanity accepts that and the Church accepts then we should be able to go the Churches and present it to them
    • Part of writing the book is an hope that the art will help us do that
    • Encourage Churchgoers to go back into their Church and evangelize this new message

 

Book

  1. Amythia – Crisis in the Natural History of Western Culture

Suleiman the Magnificent

Intro

Based on listening in on one of Robert Mawire’s video, decided to google on Suleiman.

Here are some of what I found:

  1. ISRAIR Airlines & Tourism
    Holy Sites in Jerusalem
    Link
    Throughout the history of Jerusalem, the Jewish, Christian and Muslim faiths have treasured the sacredness of the Holy Land and its Holy City Jerusalem. From the uniqueness of this City built on Seven Hills, each faith has flourished. Today’s visitor to the Holy City of Jerusalem delights in the passion and greatness of Israel’s capital awash with history, shrines holy to three faiths and relics of the past still very much alive today. The major shrines, the Wailing Wall, Temple Mount and Church of the Holy Sepulcher are highlights of each tourist’s experience. Ancient Jerusalem flourished in what today we call The Old City surrounded by its 465-year old wall. The wall has a total of 11 gates, but only seven are open – Jaffa, Zion, Dung, Loins (St. Stephen’s), Herod’s, Damascus (Shechem) and The New Gate. During the years 1536 – 1541, the Turkish sultan Suleiman built these walls. 
  2. Suleiman the Magnificent: Builder of Ottoman Jerusalem
    Link

    Suleiman commissioned the city wall overhaul in 1536 to protect Jerusalem’s perse inhabitants from a feared Crusader invasion. Although the European kingdoms had not launched a potent Crusade for several centuries by Suleiman’s time, the memory of successive Christian assaults on the Holy Land was still fresh in the minds of the region’s Muslim majority. Suleiman’s crenellated wall, over 40 feet in height, included over thirty towers and countless firing slits, all to provide ample defense from an invasion force that, ironically, never arrived. Seven gates, still open today, allowed access to every quarter of the newly fortified city.Suleiman, possessed of a remarkable religious tolerance for his time, also stressed the inclusion of the holy sites of all Jerusalem’s faiths within his city plan. When he learned that his architects had left Mount Zion, holy to the city’s Jews and Christians, outside the confines of the new wall, he had them executed (the sultan was somewhat less tolerant of failure). Under Suleiman’s benevolent rule, the revitalized Jerusalem flourished, the increased security and enforced religious tolerance sparking immigration to the city and an expansion of the mercantile economy. 

 

Videos

  1. Suleiman the Magnificent – I: Hero of All That Is – Extra History
    A young Suleiman ascends the throne of the Ottoman Empire. He wants to be a benevolent ruler, but he must prove that he is no pushover.
    Published on :- 2017-May-12th
    Link
  2. Suleiman the Magnificent – II: Master of the World – Extra History
    Knowing that most of Europe is preoccupied with internal struggles, Suleiman launches his wars against Hungary and Rhodes while they’re cut off from outside reinforcements.
    Published On:- 2016-May-19th
    Link
  3. Suleiman the Magnificent – III: Sultan of Sultans – Extra History
    The victorious Suleiman begins to consolidate his empire and his home. With Ibrahim and his favorite concubine, Roxelana, by his side, he reorganizes the empire and begins his great work: a book of laws. But Hungary still stands untaken, and he must have it
    Published On:- 2016-May-26th
    Link
  4. Suleiman the Magnificent – IV: The Shadow of God – Extra History
    When a dispute arose over the control of Hungary, Suleiman saw an opportunity to extend his empire into Europe and gain allies from those who’d asked for his help. Though he took Buda quickly, Vienna had time to fortify against him and pushed his troops back.
    Published On:- 2016-April-2nd
    Link
  5. Suleiman the Magnificent – V: Slave of God – Extra History
    Suleiman’s empire stretches across the Mediterranean, but in the midst of his success, he suspects betrayal in his own house. His best friend, Ibrahim, and his most promising son, Mustafa, both seem to have designs upon the throne.
    Published On:- 2016-April-2nd
    Link
  6. Suleiman the Magnificent – VI: Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques – Extra History
    Suleiman’s decisions came back to haunt him, starting with the Knights of Malta (once Rhodes). He tried to kick them off their island again, but failed. He launched a new campaign to take Vienna and prove the might of his empire. But he was so old…
    Published On:- 2016-April-2nd
    Link
  7. Suleiman the Magnificent – Lies – Extra History
    Suleiman lost faith in those who surrounded him, fearing that they schemed to replace him. Why do we so rarely see such destructive suspicion in our governments today? We also need to talk about what made the West dub Suleiman “Magnificent,” and the flourishing of arts and education which took place under his reign.
    Published On:- 2016-April-23rd
    Link

 

Indepth

Ibrahim

Executed Today – May 15, 2011
1536: Pargali Ibrahim Pasha, Suleiman the Magnificent’s friend and grand vizier
Link

On this date in 1536,* the Ottoman Empire’s mightiest Grand Vizier was strangled at the order of the Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent.

An Albanian [update: and/or Greek] Christian, Ibrahim Pasha — not to be confused with several other historical figures of that name, notably an Egyptian general — found his way into the Ottoman slave quarters and became a boyhood friend of the young Suleiman.

Thereafter the two would rise together: as Sultan, Suleiman rapidly promoted his trusted friend, and even married a sister to him.

So absolute was Ibrahim’s power that Italian diplomats** called him “Ibrahim the Magnificent”.
At the Ottomans’ acme, his word was law as surely as his distinguished master’s. Ibrahim’s achievements in war, diplomacy, and as a patron of the arts attested his worthiness of the honors.

References

  1. Ibrahim Pasha
    • 1536: Pargali Ibrahim Pasha, Suleiman the Magnificent’s friend and grand vizier
      Link