Jean Vanier

Background

As I went back and reviewed one of Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove’s video I heard him mention a quote from “Jean Vanier”.

The specific quote read:

People come to community because they want to help the poor.
They stay in community, because they realize they are the poor.

I thought it was profound.  And, wanted to see other quotes from Jean Vanier.

BTW, the specific video is:

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove – Oklahoma Christian Q&A
Link

And, the quote is along 3:30 to 4:15 segment.

I listed other videos here.

Quotes

  1. Talents
    • Envy comes from people’s ignorance of, or lack of belief, in their own gifts
  2. Man and Woman He Made Them
    • A society which discards those who are weak and non-productive risks exaggerating the development of reason, organisation, aggression and the desire to dominate. It becomes a society without a heart, without kindness – a rational and sad society, lacking celebration, divided within itself and given to competition, rivalry and, finally, violence.
  3. Finding Peace
    • We can be seduced…by powerful political groups that promise more wealth and lower taxes. Those with power can use clever, psychological tricks and play upon our weaknesses and brokenness in order to attract us to their way of thinking. We can be manipulated into illusion.
    • When we love and respect people, revealing to them their value, they can begin to come out from behind the walls that protect them.
    • True peace can rarely be imposed from the outside; it must be born within and between communities through meetings and dialogue and then carried outward.
    • We work for peace every time we exercise authority with wisdom and authentic love.
  4. Eruption to Hope
    • You see what I am driving at. The mentally handicapped do not have a consciousness of power. Because of this perhaps their capacity for love is more immediate, lively and developed than that of other men. They cannot be men of ambition and action in society and so develop a capacity for friendship rather than for efficiency. They are indeed weak and easily influenced, because they confidently give themselves to others; they are simple certainly, but often with a very attractive simplicity. Their first reaction is often one of welcome and not of rejection or criticism. Full of trust, they commit themselves deeply. Who amongst us has not been moved when met by the warm welcome of our boys and girls, by their smiles, their confidence and their outstretched arms. Free from the bonds of conventional society, and of ambition, they are free, not with the ambitious freedom of reason, but with an interior freedom, that of friendship. Who has not been struck by the rightness of their judgments upon the goodness or evil of men, by their profound intuition on certain human truths, by the truth and simplicity of their nature which seeks not so much to appear to be, as to be. Living in a society where simplicity has been submerged by criticism and sometimes by hypocrisy, is it not comforting to find people who can be aware, who can marvel? Their open natures are made for communion and love.
    • But how to be present to another? Our hearts are so hard. We are so insensitive to the suffering of others. We must pray the Holy Spirit to change our hearts of stone into hearts of flesh so that we may give life, for love is giving of life and liberty. By our confidence in another we can bring forth new aspirations and a taste for life in him. We can help the miserable person to live, to progress and to grow. And he will only begin to want to live when he has been told by our gestures, words, the tone of our voice, our look, our whole being that it is important that he live.
  5. Becoming Human
    • Violence
      • Every act of violence is also a message that needs to be understood.
      • I believe every act of violence is also a message that needs to be understood. Violence should not be answered just by greater violence but by real understanding. We must ask: ‘Where is the violence coming from? What is its meaning?
    • When children are loved, they live off trust; their bides and hearts open up to those who respect and love them, who understand and listen to them.
    • “To be lonely is to feel unwanted and unloved, and therefor unloveable. Loneliness is a taste of death. No wonder some people who are desperately lonely lose themselves in mental illness or violence to forget the inner pain.”
    • To reveal someone’s beauty is to reveal their value by giving them time, attention, and tenderness. To love is not just to do something for them but to reveal to them their own uniqueness, to tell them that they are special and worthy of attention.
    • What happens when a child feels unloved, unwanted? There is nothing to compare with the terrible loneliness of a child; fragile and helpless, a lonely child feels fear, anguish, a sense of guilt. And when children are wounded in their hearts, they learn to protect themselves by hiding behind barriers. Lonely children feel no commonality with adults. They have lost trust in them and in themselves, they are confused and feel misunderstood. Lonely children cannot name the pain. Only self—accusation remains. However, life wants to live. If some children fall into depression and want to die, others seem to survive despite adverse conditions such as sickness, squalor, abuse, violence, and abandonment; life can be tenacious and stubborn. Instinctively, all children learn to hide their terrible feelings behind inner walls, the shadowy areas of their being. All the disorder and darkness of their lives can be buried there. They then throw themselves into their lives, into the search for approbation, into self—fulfillment, into dreams and illusions. Hurts and pain can transform into the energy that pushes children forward. Such children can then become individuals protected by the barriers they had to build around their vulnerable, wounded hearts. Children who are less wounded will have fewer barriers. They will find it easier to live in the world and to work with others; they will not be as closed in on themselves. The lonely child is unable to connect with others. There is a lonely child in each of us, hidden behind the walls we created in order to survive. I am speaking, of course, of only one aspect of loneliness, the loneliness that can destroy some part of us, not the loneliness that creates.
    • “Every child, every person needs to know that they are a source of joy; every child, every person, needs to be celebrated. Only when all of our weaknesses are accepted as part of our humanity can our negative, broken self-images be transformed.”
    • But let us not put our sights too high. We do not have to be saviours of the world! We are simply human beings, enfolded in weakness and in hope, called together to change our world one heart at a time.
    • We human beings are all fundamentally the same. We all belong to a common, broken humanity. We all have wounded, vulnerable hearts. Each one of us needs to feel appreciated and understood; we all need help.
    • Claudia lived a horrible form of madness which should not be idealized or seen as a gateway to another world. In l’Arche, we have learned from our own experience of healing, as well as through the help of psychiatrists and psychologists, that chaos, or “madness,” has meaning; it comes from somewhere, it is comprehensible. Madness is an immense cry, a sickness. It is a way of escaping when the stress of being in a world of pain is too great. Madness is an escape from anguish. But there is an order in the disorder that can permit healing, if only it can be found.
  6. Community & Growth
    • “Look at your own poverty
      welcome it
      cherish it
      don’t be afraid
      share your death
      because thus you will share your love and your life”
    • We have to realize that this wound [of loneliness] is inherent in the human condition and that what we have to do is walk with it instead of fleeing from it. We cannot accept it until we discover that we are loved by God just as we are, and that the Holy Spirit in a mysterious way is living at the centre of the wound.
    • Communities need tensions if they are to grow and deepen. Tensions come from conflicts within each person – conflicts born out of a refusal of personal and community growth, conflicts between individual egoisms, conflicts arising from a diminishing gratuite, from a class of temperaments and from individual psychological difficulties. These are natural tensions. Anguish is the normal reaction to being brought up against our own limitations and darkness, to the discovery of our deep wound. Tension is the normal reaction to responsibilities we find hard because they make us feel insecure. We all weep and grieve inwardly at the successive deaths of our own interests.. . . When everything is going well, when the community feels it is living successfully, its members tend to let their energies dissipate, and to listen less carefully to each other. Tensions bring people back to the reality of their helplessness; obliging them to spend more time in prayer and dialogue, to work patiently to overcome the crisis and refind lost unity; making them understand that the community is more than just a human reality, that it also needs the spirit of God if it is to live and deepen.

      I am told that there is a Chinese word for ‘crisis’ which means ‘opportunity and danger’. Every tension, every crisis can become a source of new life if we approach it wisely, or it can bring death and division.”

    • We discover that we are at the same time very insignificant and very important, because each of our actions is preparing the humanity of tomorrow; it is a tiny contribution to the construction of the huge and glorious final humanity
    • The poor are always prophetic. As true prophets always point out, they reveal God’s design. That is why we should take time to listen to them. And that means staying near them, because they speak quietly and infrequently; they are afraid to speak out, they lack confidence in themselves because they have been broken and oppressed. But if we listen to them, they will bring us back to the essential.
    • A community that is growing rich and seeks only to defend its goods and its reputation is dying. It has ceased to grow in love. A community is alive when it is poor and its members feel they have to work together and remain united, if only to ensure that they can all eat tomorrow!
    • At the heart of the celebration, there are the poor. If [they] are excluded, it is not longer a celebration. […] A celebration must always be a festival of the poor.
    • I am struck by how sharing our weakness and difficulties is more nourishing to others than sharing our qualities and successes.
    • All of us have a secret desire to be seen as saints, heroes, martyrs. We are afraid to be children, to be ourselves
    • A growing community must integrate three elements: a life of silent prayer, a life of service and above all of listening to the poor, and a community life through which all its members can grow in their own gift.
    • We have to remind ourselves constantly that we are not saviours. We are simply a tiny sign, among thousands of others, that love is possible, that the world is not condemned to a struggle between oppressors and oppressed, that class and racial warfare is not inevitable.
    • A Christian community should do as Jesus did: propose and not impose. Its attraction must lie in the radiance cast by the love of brothers.
    • It is only when we stand up, with all our failings and sufferings, and try to support others rather than withdraw into ourselves, that we can fully live the life of community.
    • Many people are good at talking about what they are doing, but in fact do little. Others do a lot but don’t talk about it; they are the ones who make a community live.
    • When people love each other, they are content with very little. When we have light and joy in our hearts, we don’t need material wealth. The most loving communities are often the poorest. If our own life is luxurious and wasteful, we can’t approach poor people. If we love people, we want to identify with them and share with them.
    • One of the marvelous things about community is that it enables us to welcome and help people in a way we couldn’t as individuals. When we pool our strength and share the work and responsibility, we can welcome many people, even those in deep distress, and perhaps help them find self-confidence and inner healing.
    • Community is a sign that love is possible in a materialistic world where people so often either ignore or fight each other. It is a sign that we don’t need a lot of money to be happy–in fact, the opposite.
    • Love doesn’t mean doing extraordinary or heroic things. It means knowing how to do ordinary things with tenderness.
    • A community is only being created when its members accept that they are not going to achieve great things, that they are not going to be heroes, but simply live each day with new hope, like children, in wonderment as the sun rises and in thanksgiving as it sets. Community is only being created when they have recognized that the greatness of man is to accept his insignificance, his human condition and his earth, and to thank God for having put in a finite body the seeds of eternity which are visible in small and daily gestures of love and forgiveness. The beauty of man is in this fidelity to the wonder of each day.
    • If we are to grow in love, the prisons of our egoism must be unlocked. This implies suffering, constant effort and repeated choices.
    • People cannot accept their own evil if they do not at the same time feel loved, respected and trusted.
    • Every human activity can be put at the service of the divine and of love. We should all exercise our gift to build community.
    • The response to war is to live like brothers and sisters. The response to injustice is to share. The response to despair is a limitless trust and hope. The response to prejudice and hatred is forgiveness. To work for community is to work for humanity. To work for peace is to work for a true political solution; it is to work for the Kingdom of God. It is to work to enable every one to live and taste the secret joys of the human person united to the eternal.
    • …Individualistic material progress and the desire to gain prestige by coming out on top have taken over from the sense of fellowship, compassion and community. Now people live more or less on their own in a small house, jealously guarding their goods and planning to acquire more, with a notice on the gate that says, ‘Beware of the Dog.
    • in the end, the most important thing is not to do things for people who are poor and in distress, but to enter into relationship with them, to be with them and help them find confidence in themselves and discover their own gifts. . . . The promise of Jesus is to help us discover that the poor are a source of life and not just objects of our charity.
    • The cry for love and communion and for recognition that rises from the hearts of people in need reveals the fountain of love in us and our capacity to give life. At the same time, it can reveal our hardness of heart and are fears. Their cry is so demanding, and we are frequently seduced by wealth, power and the values of our societies. We want to climb the ladder of human promotion; we want to be recognized for our efficiency, power and virtue. The cry of the poor is threatening to the rich person within us.We are sometimes prepared to give money and a little time, but we are frightened to give our hearts, to enter into a personal relationship of love and communion with them. For if we do so, we shall have to die to all our selfishness and to all the hardness of our heart.
    • “Community as caring . . .So many people enter groups in order to develop a certain form of spirituality or to acquire knowledge about the things of God and of humanity. But that is not community; it is a school. It becomes community only when people start truly caring for each other and for each other’s growth.”
    • In community, people let down barriers; appearances and masks disappear. But this is not easy. Many people have built up their personalities precisely by hiding their wounded hearts behind the barriers of independence and of the attitude, “I know, you don’t”. They are highly active and their activity is based on the need to assert, to succeed, to control, to do projects and to be recognized . . .A community comes about when people are no longer hiding from one another, no longer pretending or proving their value to another.
  7. Spirituality
    • We are not called by God to do extraordinary things, but to do ordinary things with extraordinary love.
  8. Love
    • To love someone is to show to them their beauty, their worth and their importance.
  9. Introspection
    • Growth begins when we start to accept our own weakness
    • This evolution towards a real responsibility for others is sometimes blocked by fear. It is easier to stay on the level of a pleasant way of life in which we keep our freedom and our distance. But that means that we stop growing and shut ourselves up in our own small concerns and pleasures.
  10. Humanity
    • Our humanity is so beautiful, but it needs to be transformed
  11. From Brokenness to Community
    • To be in communion means to be with someone and to discover that we actually belong together. Communion means accepting people just as they are, with all their limits and inner pain, but also with their gifts and their beauty and their capacity to grow: to see the beauty inside of all the pain. To love someone is not first of all to do things for them, but to reveal to them their beauty and value, to say to them through our attitude: “You are beautiful. You are important. I trust you. You can trust”

 

Yuval Noah Harari – “Organisms are Algorithms”

Quotations

  1. Organisms are algorithm
    • Humans try to explain themselves in terms of the great technology of the day
  2. What enables human beings to contribute alone in large numbers
    • Our Imagination
    • Our ability to create fictional stories
      • Obey same stories
    • Other Animals
      • Use language to describe realities
    • Humans
      • Use language to convey imagination
  3. Algorithms that can understand humans better than humans can understand myself

 

Videos

  1. HUJI Talks – BOG 2018 – Professor Yuval Noah Harari
    Hacking human beings… Digital dictatorships… A biological, technological reality? Do we have the necessary computing power and biological insight? Will algorithms know us better than we know ourselves?
    Link
  2. How Sapiens Conquered the World – Yuval Harari, at USI
    Channel :- USIEvents ( USI – Unexpected Sources of Inspiration )
    Published On :- 2016-July-16th
    Link
  3. Yuval Harari: “Techno-Religions and Silicon Prophets” | Talks at Google
    Techno-Religions and Silicon Prophets: Will the 21st century be shaped by hi-tech gurus or by religious zealots – or are they the same thing? What is the current status of religions and ideologies in the world, and what will be the likely impact of 21st-century technological breakthroughs on religion and ideology? Will traditional religions and ideologies—from Christianity and Islam to Liberalism and Socialism—manage to survive the technological and economic revolutions of the 21st century? What would be the place of Islam, for example, in a world of genetic engineering and artificial intelligence? The talk addresses these questions, and argues that the future belongs to techno-religions, which promise salvation through technology, and which are already gathering believers in places such as Silicon Valley.
    Channel :- Talks at Google
    Published On :- 2015-feb-8th
    Link

Mother in Training ( MIT )

Yesterday was a good day.

I drove about two hours to come out and support a friend whose mother passed a week or so ago.

The event was very good and one of the things I remembered is the founding Pastor saying that as he was preparing to step down as the Lead Pastor what he wanted most from his designee is a pledge to be just as attentive to the senior members has he was.

The service itself lasted over two hours.  Later I asked one of the members why so long.  He replied that they really do celebrate the “Life of …”.

Later we visited the home of my friend’s mother.

Everything was together and coordinated.

As we were preparing to wrap up I noticed the ladies doing most of the work.  Some were inside helping with the food.

As one who sat outside, I was more observant of the ladies that were serving and tending to the senior flock outside.

The grace, depth, and the quick wit of their conversation is what stays with me yet even this morning.

They folded up the chairs, drew down the campers, and gathered up the table clothes.

In this particular group, there were three ladies.

I heard one of them refer to the one that was the “Lead” as the MIT.  I looked at them puzzled as to why she was being called MIT.  They noticed my bewilderment and asked if I knew what MIT meant and I replied yes.

Stating it meant Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  She replied No.  And, offered that it meant “Mother in Training“.

Being one who weighs words, I have tried to picture those words many applicability.

I think the first association that I drew was that the lead is preparing to be a senior citizen, as well.  Culturally being elderly is sometimes associated with having earned the rights to be needy and directive.

In essence it is a “Word Play” lazily directed at my new friend, “The Lead“.

Longer term it will resonate with all those called to mother younger people in society, places of worship and honor.

And what a privilege that is.

Twice I asked her how they enjoin the togetherness and harmony with each other.  Knowing me I likely asked in different ways.

And, both times she answered affirmatively that it is through surrender to our Lord and Savior.  She continued that when things starts to go sideways she asks herself that this likely not how her savior will navigate this journey; and that eases her to turn over the wheel.

They dialogue within the group, hear each other truths, and allow the Spirit to witness and bring them to where HE IS.

HomeTeam History :- Know Thyself

 

Videos

  1. How Did Christianity Come To Africa?
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • How Did Christianity Come To Africa?
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2018-May-10th
          Link
  2. Top 10 African Tribes Taken In The Atlantic Slave Trade
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • Top 10 African Tribes Taken In The Atlantic Slave Trade
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2018-April-5th
          Link
  3. West African Ethnic Groups Who Claim Origin in Eastern Africa?
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • West African Ethnic Groups Who Claim Origin in Eastern Africa?
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2018-May-10th
          Link
  4. West and East African Connection
    • Profile
      • I discuss the connection between West Africa and East Africa and the numerous West African tribes that claim origin in East Africa!
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • West and East African Connection
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2014-March-17th
          Link
  5. Homosexuality in Africa
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • West African Ethnic Groups Who Claim Origin in Eastern Africa?
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2015-June-7th
          Link
        • Video #2
          Link

In depth

How Did Christianity Come To Africa?

  1. Matthew
    • He got up and left for Egypt; And, out of Egypt I have called my son ( Matthew 2:15 )
    • Simon from Cyrene ( Acts 8:26-40 )
  2. Acts
    • Phillip
      • Ethiopian Eunuch
  3. Eastern Africa
    • Ethiopia
      • 330 AD
        • State Religion
    • Portuguese
      • 15th Century
      • Trade
        • When you are trading things, you are not only trading things, but trading ideas
      • Congo
  4. West Africa

Top 10 African Tribes Taken In The Atlantic Slave Trade

Tribe

  1. Chamba ( 10th )
    • Country
      • Nigeria
      • Cameroon
  2. Wolof ( 9th )
    • Country
      • Senegal
      • Gambia
      • Mauritania
    •  Religion
      • Islam
  3. Abron ( 8th )
    • Country
      • Ghana
  4. Fulani ( 7th )
    • Country
      • Senegal
      • Nigeria
      • Cameroon
    • From
      • Algeria
    • Religion
      • Islam
  5. Mande ( 6th )
    • Culture
      • Mandika
    • Country
      • Senegal
      • Nigeria
      • Cameroon
    • From
      • Sahara
    • Religion
      • Islam
  6. Fon (  5th )
    • Country
      • Benin
      • Dahomey
      • Nigeria
      • Togo
    • Years
      • 17th Century
    • Destination
      • Haiti
      • Trinidad
  7. Bakongo
    • Country
      • Central Africa
        • Congo
        • Angola
    • Years
      • 13th Century
    • Religion
      • Christianity
        • Via Portuguese Trade
        • We need
          • Priest
          • School Teachers
    • Destination
      • Brazil
  8. Igbo ( 3rd )
    • Country
      • Nigeria
    • Got caught up
      • “Aro” Confederacy
      • 14.6%
    • Religion
      • Christianity
  9. Yoruba ( 2nd )
    • Country
      • Nigeria
    • Got caught up
      • Oyo
      • 13%
    •  Religion
      • Christianity
    • Destination
      • Cuba
      • Brazil
    • Culture
      • Pantheon
        • Orisha
  10. Mbundu ( 1st )
    • Country
      • Angola
      • Congo
    • Religion
      • Christianity
    • Destination
      • Brazil
    • Culture
      • Martial Art

Cited

Wikipedia

Slavery in Angola

Link

In current day Angola, high levels of child trafficking, commercial sexual exploitation, pornography, forced labor, sexual slavery, and other forms of exploitation are reported, in part due to the civil war-caused break down of social structures and traditional security mechanisms active before independence. Angola is a source country for significant number of men, women and children trafficked for the purposes of forced labor or sexual exploitation. Children have been trafficked internally and also to Namibia and South Africa for the purposes of sexual exploitation and domestic and commercial labor. The Government of Angola does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

At present, it is estimated that over one million primary school age children are out of school, the majority of them being girls. There is a strong correlation between women’s education and the increased vulnerability of both mothers and children to a range of life-threatening conditions, including forced labour and prostitution.

Igbo people in the Atlantic slave trade

Link

  1. Ethnic groups were fairly saturated in certain parts of the Americas because of planters preferences for certain African peoples.The Igbo were dispersed to colonies such as Jamaica, Cuba, Haiti, Barbados, the colonies in the future United States, Belize, Trinidad and Tobago among others. Elements of Igbo culture can still be found in these places. In the United States the Igbo were commonly found in the states of Maryland and Virginia.
  2. The slave trade in this region really started to take off with the appearance of the first Portuguese Ships. There were multiple different ways that people were gathered or taken to be sold off to the Europeans. Most of the slaves that were taken were from the Igbo and the Ibibio peoples, as well as some of the smaller groups in the surrounding area. While some people were taken during raids and wars, it was not the most common way for people to become enslaves, contrary to popular belief. One of the more common ways for people to become enslaved were to be sold off. For example, if a thief was caught in a village, the person would be sold to the slave traders by the elders. The elders would then use the money for the betterment of the community. Another example is for people who were unfaithful to their spouse. Women who had committed adultery could be sold off by their husbands. Another common way to be brought into slavery was to be sold, or “pawned” to settle debts. Children were often used to settle these debts.Kidnapping is also a common way to be forced into slavery. Slave traders would often seek out children who were alone, or small groups of people who were traveling and ambush them. This forced people to have to travel in rather large, armed, groups to protect themselves. Although this is similar to war and raiding, it is at a much smaller scale. Children who were home alone while their parents were working were especially easy targets for the slave traders.

    Adults were the most common ones taken, amounting to roughly 85% of the total slave trade from this region, children only made up about 15%. The main reason for this was because adults were already capable of performing hard labor, and had better chances of surviving the grueling journey across the sea.

  3. Haiti
    • Some slaves arriving in Haiti included Igbo people who were considered suicidal and therefore unwanted by plantation owners. According to Adiele Afigbo there is still the Creole saying of Ibos pend’cor’a yo (the Ibo hang themselves).Aspects of Haitian culture that exhibit this can be seen in the Ibo loa, a Haitian loa (or deity) created by the Igbo in the Vodun religion.
  4. United States
    • In the 19th century the state of Virginia received around 37,000 slaves from Calabar of which 30,000 were Igbo according to Douglas B. Chambers. The Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia estimates around 38% of captives taken to Virginia were from the Bight of Biafra. Igbo peoples constituted the majority of enslaved Africans in Maryland. Chambers has been quoted saying “My research suggests that perhaps 60 percent of black Americans have at least one Igbo ancestor…”

References

  1. Wikipedia
    • Angola
      • Slavery in Angola
        Link
    • Igbo
      • Igbo people in the Atlantic slave trade
        Link

Parting Shots

“… Making me a product of Survival.” – HomeTeam History

Despite his questioning, he affirms his faith in Christianity, as seen in the penultimate sentence of his work that quotes the prophet Micah: “After all, what makes any event important, unless by its observation we become better and wiser, and learn ‘to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before God?'” – Olaudah Equiano ( Link )

ABC News (Australia)

 

Videos

  1.  Inside insular Jewish community where headmistress Malka Leifer allegedly preyed on girls
    • Videos
      • Part 1
        Mother-of-eight Malka Leifer looked like the perfect school principal until she was accused of being a sexual predator. This is the Australian Story of three sisters’ battle to bring their alleged abuser to justice amid the Adass Israel community in Melbourne that encouraged silence.
        Link
      • Part 2
        Former Melbourne headmistress Malka Leifer made claims she was mentally incapable to appear before an Israeli court to face extradition to Australia where she is wanted on 74 child sex abuse claims. But undercover surveillance footage prompts a breakthrough in the case.
        Link
  2. Thai cave rescue: Australian divers who helped free Thai soccer team receive bravery awards
    • Videos
      • Video #1
        Nine Australians who worked with an international team to rescue 12 young boys and their soccer coach from a flooded cave system in Thailand earlier this month have been honoured with prestigious bravery awards by Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove.
        Link

 

 

The Bible Project

Videos

  1. Bible Project
    • In this video, we explore the mysterious promise on page three of the Bible, that a promised deliverer would one day come to confront evil and rescue humanity. We trace this theme through the family of Abraham, the messianic lineage of David, and ultimately to Jesus who defeated evil by letting it defeat him.
      Published on :- 2014-Sept-30th
      Link
  2.  Job
    • How do you trust God even when life isn’t fair and you suffer for no good reason? Job’s story invites us to consider what it means that God runs the world by wisdom, and how this truth can bring peace in dark times. Job is the last of the three books that explore these themes of biblical wisdom.
      Link
  3. Jonah
    • Watch our Read Scripture video on the book of Jonah, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. The book of Jonah is a subversive story about a rebellious prophet who despises his God for loving his enemies.
      Link
  4.  Justice
    • “Justice” is a felt need in our world today and a controversial topic. But what is justice, exactly, and who gets to define it? In this video, we’ll explore the biblical theme of Justice and discover how it’s deeply rooted in the story-line of the Bible that leads to Jesus.
      Link
  5. Exile
    • Exile is one of the core, yet often overlooked, themes underlying the entire Biblical storyline. In this video, we’ll see how Israel’s exile to Babylon is a picture of all humanity’s exile from Eden. As you might guess, Jesus is the one to open the way back home.
      Link
  6. Holiness
    • In this video, we explore the paradox that God’s holiness presents to human beings. God is the unique and set-apart Creator of all reality and the author of all goodness. However, that goodness can become dangerous to humans who are mortal and morally corrupt. Ultimately, this paradox is resolved by Jesus, who embodies God’s holiness that comes to heal His creation.
      Link
  7. Daniel
    • Watch our Read Scripture video on the book of Daniel, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. The story of Daniel motivates faithfulness despite exile in Babylon. His visions offer hope that God will bring all nations under His rule.
      Link
  8. Read Scripture: TaNaK / Old Testament
    • Watch our Read Scripture video on the overview of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew Bible, or the TaNaK. This video breaks down the literary design of the entire Old Testament and its flow of thought.
      Link
  9. Literal Styles in the Bible
    • Episode 3 shows how reading the Bible wisely requires that we learn about the ancient literary styles used by the biblical authors. These writers expressed their ideas and claims through a variety of different type of literature, and this video will explore why it’s important to tell them apart so we can hear their message on their terms.
      Link
  10.  Revelations
    • Revelations :- Chapter 1:11
      • Watch our Read Scripture video on the book of Revelation, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In Revelation, John’s visions reveal that Jesus has overcome evil by his death and resurrection, and will return one day as the true king of the world.
        Link
    • Revelations :- Chapter 12:24
      • Watch our Read Scripture video on the book of Revelation, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In Revelation, John’s visions reveal that Jesus has overcome evil by his death and resurrection, and will return one day as the true king of the world.
        Link
  11. The Book of Jude
    • Watch our Read Scripture video on the book of Jude, which breaks down the literary design of the book and its flow of thought. In this book, Jude confronts corrupt teachers who distort the message about his brother Jesus and lead others astray.
      Link
  12. Philemon
    • Read Scripture
      Link

It will mean more….

 

Exactly 20 minutes ago, I rushed through the clutter of life to get to the bus stop; hoping to catch that lorry that is prayerfully 10 minutes late for everyone, but right on time for me.

As I got on the bus, I let out a smile hoping that the conductor will be accepting of my otherwise empty gratitude.

 

Takes me back to just yesterday.

Her friend had gone with us to help pick out clothes.  Knowing that my taste and hers do not match,  she had brought along a more cheerful mate.

A Barnes & Noble was not too far off and so took the opportunity to pick up reading materials.

Got a couple for mum, as well.  And, so here I am dropping off those books.

I know she will rather know we are bringing guests.

And, so upon arriving my invite to our un-attached was a bit half-hearted.

She kindly said No, and politely offered to wait in the car for us.

A few minutes later Dad came home from his afternoon walk with Latte.  Latte had refused to go that morning.  But, who can resist the California sun twice in one day.

The Dog is 14 years old now.  He was breathing heavy.  He kept his mouth open gasping for air and I noticed his worn teeth.

Latte is a pass me down from my Sisi.  I never asked if Latte knows Sin is her birth mother.

Back to our third wheel.  I went inside with Dad and he later asked if she does not want to come in.  To which I replied,  “It will mean more if it came from them“.

And, so he took upon offering the invite.  To which she kept her NO.

A few later, Mum said she would go out.

She brought the young lady in.  And, Dad offered that Mum is more persuasive than he is.  To which I retorted more pushy.

I always knew that an invite from the woman of the house, my mother, will make a world of difference.

As Dad spoke and reflected on life, I looked over at Mum and Wifey do same.

Last Christmas with the whole family over, they went over choosing mates and partners in life and love.

They don’t have to talk about it, they have lived and living it.

Something about a sermon not been preached, yet lived.

As I got up this morning, knowing the love of my life, will be gone for 3 weeks. I couldn’t quite get myself together.

We had had a busy and full weekend.  But, still there was always one more thing to say.

What I really wanted to say is what God had given me to say yesterday.  And, that was how thankful I should be to the cost my Love bears as she opens up herself for and to me.

To some opening up comes with ease; yet to others it comes guarded.

And, so here are to those things that mean more.

A lifetime ago,  God showed himself, replanted and re-souled in our lives and everything has meant more ever since.