Church in Society ( 2017-Oct )

Background

Again, this is an area, I will rather not go.

Yet, it is one that stirs our conscience and thoughts.

And, that is reason enough to see what people are saying and why they are saying it.

Predication

Introduction

We all have our own bias and depositions.

And, it is best to lay them bare ahead of time.

Most of my comments will be based on what I have heard from others prior to anything that I will cover in this post.

It is often useful to have some foundational predisposition as that lessens the opportunity to be swayed within each decision point.

Even better when commentators are not even speaking specifically on the new material.

Earlier Words

  1. Damon Thompson
    • Sometimes God places something in our heart, but unfortunately so much  of what has gone out in the Prophetic World was not undergirded in scripture
    • And, so I, Damon Thompson, need the foundation of Scripture
  2. Neil Ellis
    • This is a Church of matured faith
    • You have been preaching, but you were fearful of how the preaching will be accepted
    • Sometimes the Devil magnifies things and makes them appear more than they really are
    • Sometimes as a pastor what makes us press even though there is “Hell on the Outside” is that we are satisfied that we have the confidence of the people inside
    • Can the Lord trust you, and can the Bishop/Leadership depend on you?
    • Free your Spirit, but challenge your people
    • A faith that has not been tested, is a faith that can not be trusted
  3. Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
    • Sotomayor was asked to explain her remarks from a 2001 speech in which she said she agreed that “there is no objective stance but only a series of perspectives — no neutrality, no escape from choice in judging.”  She told the committee that, in every case, the two opposing parties view the facts from vastly different perspectives. “You can’t just throw up your hands and say I’m not going to rule,” she said. There is a choice in judging, which means “you have to rule.”

Videos

Here are some of the videos that I will later comment on.

  1. Paula White
    • Trump’s spiritual adviser: More devout than you…
      Donald Trump’s spiritual adviser, televangelist Paula White, spoke to CNN’s Erin Burnett in August about the Republican presidential nominee’s faith and the phone call that kicked off their friendship.
      Channel :- CNN
      Published On :- 2016-Oct-20th
      Link
    • Inauguration
      • Meet The Woman Who Many Call President Elect Donald Trump’s Spiritual Adviser | NBC Nightly News
        Critics have slammed her as a charlatan, but in a rare interview with NBC’s Anne Thompson, Paula White defends her message and gives insight into the president-elect’s beliefs.
        Channel :- NBC News
        Published On :- 2017-Jan-19th
        Link
    • Jim Baker
      • Two Corinthians’ Gaffe Was ‘A Setup
        • RWW News: Paula White Says That Trump’s ‘Two Corinthians’ Gaffe Was ‘A Setup’
          Published On :- 2017-August-23th
          Link
      • Opposition to God
        • RWW News: Paula White Says Opposition To President Trump Is Opposition To God
          Published On :- 2017-August-21st
          Link
  2. Pastor Jamal Bryant
    • Pastor Jamal Bryant – The problem with Paula White…
      Published On :- 2017-August-25th
      Link
  3. Roland Martin
    • Roland Martin To Paula White: Be A Prophetic Voice And Don’t Just Be A Profitable Voice
      Roland Martin rips Pastor Paula White for her partisan comments about Donald Trump: Be a prophetic voice and don’t just be a profitable voice.
      Published On :- 2017-August-23th
      Link

 

Leadership

Seated Under

Those in leadership do not always get to take a day off.

Not only does what they think matter, but also how they got there.

I have grown from listening in person or via youtube to the people listed above.

And, that makes me forever grateful.

Influencing Capital

The further we grow, the more influencing capital we personally have and have access to.

After long and hard battles our role will be examined; especially if our role is seen to have moved the needle towards an unexpected end.

Unfortunately it is not just our choice that is examined, but the totality of our live.

Circumference of Relationships

Relationships often covers so much space.

And, some of those spaces overlap and are not necessarily disjointed.

And, so even within a body, for instance Faith community, uniformity does not necessarily translate to conformity.

People sometimes reach different conclusions and they should be free to do so.

This is more so where there are personal relationships with those that are being discussed.

 

In Essentials Unity, In Nonessentials Liberty, In All Things Charity

Link
Philip Schaff, the distinguished nineteenth-century church historian, calls the saying in our title “the watchword of Christian peacemakers” (History of the Christian Church, vol. 7, p. 650). Often attributed to great theologians such as Augustine, it comes from an otherwise undistinguished German Lutheran theologian of the early seventeenth century, Rupertus Meldenius. The phrase occurs in a tract on Christian unity written (circa 1627) during the Thirty Years War (1618–1648), a bloody time in European history in which religious tensions played a significant role.

 

Sola Scriptura

  1. Laws of Social Responsibility
    If ever you take your neighbor’s cloak in pledge, you shall return it to him before the sun goes down, for that is his only covering, and it is his cloak for his body; in what else shall he sleep? And if he cries to me, I will hear, for I am compassionate.
    You shall not curse God, nor curse a ruler of your people. ( Exodus 22:27-28 )
  2. Paul Before the Sanhedrin
    • But those standing nearby said, “How dare you insult the high priest of God!”
      “Brothers, Paul replied, “I was not aware that he was the high priest, for it is written: ‘Do not speak evil about the ruler of your people.’”
      ( Acts 23:4-5 )
  3. David, Saul, Jonathan, & Mephibosheth
    • And Mephibosheth the son of Saul came down to meet the king. He had neither taken care of his feet nor trimmed his beard nor washed his clothes, from the day the king departed until the day he came back in safety. ( 2nd Samuel 19:24 )
    • He answered, “My lord, O king, my servant deceived me, for your servant said to him, ‘I will saddle a donkey for myself, that I may ride on it and go with the king.’ For your servant is lame. ( 2nd Samuel 19:26 )
    • He has slandered your servant to my lord the king. But my lord the king is like the angel of God; do therefore what seems good to you. ( 2nd Samuel 19:27 )
    • For all my father’s house were but men doomed to death before my lord the king, but you set your servant among those who eat at your table. What further right have I, then, to cry to the king?” ( 2nd Samuel 19:28 )
    • And the king said to him, “Why speak any more of your affairs? I have decided: you and Ziba shall divide the land.” ( 2nd Samuel 19:29 )
    • Mephibosheth said to the king, “Let him even take it all, since my lord the king has come safely to his own house.” ( 2nd Samuel 19:30 )

Summary

In summary I find myself always returning to a couple of words :-

  1. Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad
    • Allah’s hand of protection is with the maintenance of unity, you should beware of division.
    • The one isolated from the group is a prey to Satan, just as the one isolated from the flock is a prey to the wolves
    • You can not base a spiritual life on suspiciousness, cursing and allocating blame.
  2. Abraham Lincoln
    • I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for that day.”

Closing

Love never fails … for we know in part and we prophesy in part.

The Loving Decision

Background

June 13th, 2017

50 years ago [ today ], the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Loving — Mildred and Richard Loving, who successfully sued the state of Virginia, forcing it to recognize their interracial marriage. That landmark case overturned laws against interracial marriages all across the country.

 

Videos

  1. The { } And
    • Chamika and Khalil Cumberbatch
      • Formerly Incarcerated Father Opens Up to Daughter | {THE AND} Mia & Khalil
        Mia & Khalil, a father and daughter separated for years by the federal prison system, discuss the hardship that has defined their relationship. 9 year old Mia bravely opens up about what it meant that her father was incarcerated, and Khalil, now a criminal justice reform activist at JustLeadershipUSA, can only admire how strong his daughter has become.

        • Videos
          • Smaller Clip
            Published On :- 2017-Oct-4th
            Link
          • Full
            Published On :- 2016-Oct-10th
            Link
      • The Window | Khalil – Life in Immigration Detention
        • Video
          • The Window | Khalil – Life in Immigration Detention (Part 1)
            A Guyanese transplant to New York, Khalil came of age as an inmate in maximum security facilities during his twenties. After his release, he dedicated his life to education, social justice and his family, only to be taken away by immigration detention, and possibly deported after 25 years in the United States.
            Link
          • The Window | Khalil – Life in Immigration Detention (Part 2)
            Following his session of The Window, Khalil, was at a loss of words processing the amount of love and support his family and friends showed him during their reflections of his struggle in Immigration Detention. Here is what he finally said about the eye-opening experience.
            Link
    • How Will We Raise A Biracial Kid? | {THE AND} Keisha & Andrew
      Keisha & Andrew are back with {THE AND} after a year, still laughing with and at each other. But things get real as they confront their fears of the future, like having a biracial child in the #BlackLivesMatter era (Part 1 of 2) | Watch Part 2: http://bit.ly/KeishaAndrew2
      Publisher :- The Skin Deep
      Link
    • Wrongly Arrested At 16 | {THE AND} David & Adama
      David & Adama, friends through the hardest of times, look how far they’ve taken their unlikely pairing since they first met. Adama, wrongfully imprisoned by the US government at age 16, wonders if American society will ever truly be comfortable with her religion, and David admits that his proudest moment in life wouldn’t have come to pass without her.
      Published On :- 2017-May-17th
      Link
    • {THE AND} Francesca & Azzah
      • {THE AND} Francesca & Azzah | Being Muslim in America is Hard Sometimes
        Francesca & Azzah, close friends and recent graduates, discuss the shifting social climate in the United States and its impact on their friendship. Azzah shares growing concerns about her identity as an immigrant and Muslim woman to Francesca, who relied deeply on Azzah during the rough patches in her life. Filmed in July 2016, this dialogue between two young women of color is more relevant now than ever.
        Publisher :- The Skin Deep
        Published On :- 2017-Feb-8th
        Link
  2. The Loving Decision
    • We Talk to Interracial Couples 50 Years After Loving v. Virginia (HBO)
      Published On :- 2013-Oct-26th
      Link
    • Features
      • Former Secretary of Defense William Cohen & Janey Langhart Cohen
      • Vaughn J. Buffalo and Gail Russell Buffalo
      • Enroll McDonald and Klara Glowczewska
      • Rev. John Janka and Rev. Jacqui Lewis
      • Chris Connolly and Joy Connolly
  3. Amanda Roman Leak, Ryan Leak
    • The Surprise Wedding ( Shorter Version )
      Station :- Amanda Roman Leak
      Published On :- 2013-Oct-26th
      Link
    • The Surprise Wedding
      On June 7, 2013, Ryan Leak proposed to his girlfriend. Her dream was to get engaged and married on the same day, and so later on that night… He had planned her surprise dream wedding. We have always talked about what we want our special day to be about. And for us, we want it to be about something bigger than ourselves. Recently, we were moved by an organization called A21 who fights sex trafficking all over the world. And so the idea for this day was: There’s 27 million girls caught in sex slavery, and every single one of them deserves their own dream wedding. And so we asked all of our guest at the wedding to give to A21 instead of getting us traditional wedding presents. If you’d like to learn more about A21 and join our guest in giving, go to: http://bit.ly/1g7zrye
      Link
    • Viral Video Newlyweds Credit as Inspiration
      Link
    • Chasing Failure
      Link
  4. Adanna & David
    • OUR WEDDING VIDEO | AdannaDavid
      Hi guys, the video from our wedding is finally up. We hope you enjoy watching it as much as we enjoyed the day! Love, Adanna & David Check out our ‘Bei-de’ Jewellery collection: https://stilnest.com/adanna-david
      Published On :- 2014-Nov-29th
      Link
    • Adanna & David dancing to Afrobeats
      Published On :- 2017-Jan-17th
      Link
    • Adanna & Adamma
      • MEET MY TWIN SISTER – TWIN TAG | AdannaDavid
        A lot of you have requested for me to do a ‘Twin Tag’ while my twin sister was visiting.
        Published On :- 2016-March-13th
        Link
  5. Ruffine & Nicolas Delfosse
    • Opening Wedding Dance – Ruffine & Nicolas (Etta James – covered by Beyoncé, Bracket, P-Square)
      Published On :- 2015-Sept-5th
      Link
  6. Thirty Minutes After Watching this Proposal Video and We’re Still Sobbing.
    • Thirty Minutes After Watching this Proposal Video and We’re Still Sobbing.
      Publisher :- How he asked.com
      Published On :- 2016-Nov-7th
  7. Cedric Thompson Jr and Charlotte Paguyo
    • An NFL Players Heartwarming Proposal: A Love Story
      Thank you Ced and Charlotte for letting me be apart of this beautiful moment. “An NFL Players Heartwarming Proposal: A Love Story”
      Link
  8. Love Without Borders
    • Love Without Borders – Season 1 – Episode 1
      In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Loving v. Virginia decision, we gathered eight multicultural couples to talk about their experiences in America.
      Published On :- 2017-April-27th
      Link
    • Love Without Borders – Season 1 – Episode 4
      Multiethnic Couples Talk About Their Weddings | Love Without Borders S1 EP4 | BRIDES
      Link
    • Love Without Borders – Season 1 – Episode 5
      The One Thing You Should Never Say to Multicultural Couples | Love Without Borders S1 EP5 | BRIDES
      Published On :- 2017-April-27th
      Link
  9. Christopher M. Harris & Britt Harris
    • Stories
      • After US Army Specialist Christopher M. Harris was killed in Afghanistan, his wife Britt asked his fellow soldiers to reveal the gender of their unborn child
    • Participants
      • Christopher M. Harris
      • Britt Harris
    • Videos
      • Troops reveal gender of fallen soldier’s baby
        Link
    • Dates
      • Deceased :- August 2nd, 2017
  10. Crystal and Joseph
    • Crystal and Joseph were married at Sheraton Columbia Town Center Hotel in Columbia, Maryland.
    • Wedding Blog ( Link )
    • Stories
      • Groom cries as Bride walks down the Aisle {Crystal and Joseph}
    • Participants
      • Crystal
      • Joseph
    • Videos
      • Groom cries as Bride walks down the Aisle {Crystal and Joseph}
        Dates Published :- 2017-June-24th
        Link

 

Indepth

The { } And

Wrongly Arrested At 16 | {THE AND} David & Adama

  1. Adama
    • Koran
      • After every hardship there is ease
      • Black, Woman, and Muslim
      • I have to go pass those strikes
  2. David
    • Adama granted Asylum

Khalil, Chamika, Mia Cumberbatch

The Window | Khalil – Life in Immigration Detention (Part 2)

  1. Did not want to call him father
    • I was fearful that if I gave him that title, he wouldn’t live up to it
    • But, the reality is that he has done that and so much more
  2. Brother
    • Met each other in a very dark, a very dark place
    • We did not have anything to offer each other, but friendship
    • But, he took that
    • And, we have both survived it, because of the camaraderie that we have
  3. Fatherhood
    • Change my legacy
    • Change my legacy about Prisonhood
    • Coming closer to that goal
  4. Friendship
    • Dickson
      • Believe in me, even when I did not believe in myself
  5. Friendship
    • Seeds
      • Support
      • Criticism
      • Inspiration
    • Becoming
      • Husband
      • Father
      • Advocate
    • Mirroring
      • Joy
      • Inspiration
      • Gratitude

Formerly Incarcerated Father Opens Up to Daughter | {THE AND} Mia & Khalil

  1. Mia
    • What scares you the most
  2. Khalil
    • I will look back on my life and wish I was a great parent
  3. Mia
    • There is no change to make you a great parent, you are actually a great parent

 

 

Pledges

There are many pledges we make in our lives.

One of the wives featured in the HBO documentary, “We Talk to Interracial Couples 50 Years After Loving v. Virginia (HBO)”, said “Being married to John keeps me accountable. I cannot do they…They are.  I wake up to this guy.  My husband.

Here is hoping you have set some traps in your life that forbade you from Saying They, and even more Lividly Living against “They”.

 

Nabeel & Michelle Qureshi – “The Wind and the Waves still know his name”

Quotes

Michelle Qureshi

Link

The Wind and the Waves still know his name

You cannot walk this alone

Nabeel Qureshi

He is sovereign and I love him

Link

Hazem Farraj

God has not changed

Link

 

Videos

  1. Nabeel Qureshi
    • God is a God of Love
      Nabeel’s word from a video made by Nabeel Qureshi’s great friend, David Wood
      Published On :- 2017-Sept-26th
      Link
    • His Prayer before passing away
      Channel :- CBN News
      Published :- 2017-Sept-18th
      Link
    • NABEEL QURESHI (1983-2017) – VLOG IN 4 Minutes
      Channel :- Natha
      Published :- 2017-Sept-18th
      Link
    • Vlog 24 – Ayah and Mark Mittelberg
      In this unnecessarily emotional video, I discuss some thoughts that arose after the visit of my good friend Mark Mittelberg and give you a quick glimpse of my daughter Ayah
      Channel :- NQ Ministries
      Published :- 2017-April-13th
      Link
  2. Michelle Qureshi
    • Vlog 30 – Michelle’s Thoughts and Advice
      In this video I ask my bride Michelle some questions about this season of life, and some thoughts to share with others going through similar situations.
      Published On :- 2017-May-23rd
      Link
    • Vlog 44 – A More Glorious End
      Published On :- 2017-Sept-26th
      Link
  3. Amir Yunas
    • A Tribute to Nabeel Qureshi
      Nabeels Life summarized by his true childhood friend. I Don’t promote the teachings of Nabeel whatsoever, however, this is childhood friend, and I feel sad, so I shared my heart. NOTE: Please turn ON subtitles to get a translation to the Arabic Poetry. At the end of my few words is a photo tribute to Nabeel’s Life and the translation to the Arabic Poem.
      Published On :- 2017-Sept-18th

      Link
  4. Nabeel’s Dad
    • Vlog 33 – A Very Special Guest: My Dad!
      In this Vlog I introduce my Abba, give a clarification on my shirt, and an update on my health 🙂 Immunotherapy on Monday!
      Published On :- 2017-June-9th
      Link
  5. Ravi Zacharias
    • Ravi Zacharias Eulogy at Nabeel Qureshi’s Funeral
      Published On :- 2017-Sept-21st
      Link

 

pInterest

  1. Daniel Adeniji
    • Nabeel & Michelle Qureshi
      Link

Malcolm & Steve Kerr – The Story of a father and his Son

By: Chris Korman
June 3, 2015
Link

Hours after finding out his father had been shot twice in the head and killed on the other side of the world, Steve Kerr sat on the bed in his dorm room at the University of Arizona and received teammates who came to offer condolences.

Lute Olson, the first-year coach who’d been desperate enough to give Kerr a spot on his team, sat there with him.

What most of Kerr’s old teammates remember is that he did not have much to say.

He had, upon hearing the news via phone from a family friend, gone running into the streets aimlessly.

He was calmer now.

It was the middle of the night. The players were bewildered. Their coaches had knocked loudly, pushing them from slumber toward a room where an 18-year-old boy they were just getting to know was dealing with the loss of his father far away from family; one brother was in Cairo, another remained in Lebanon with their mother and his sister was in Taiwan.

 

Malcolm Kerr, a devoted academic not even 18 months into his dream job as the president of the American University in Beirut, built his life around bridging the divide between Christians, Muslims, and Jews when, for most Americans, those matters were abstract and distant.

They weighed heavily on President Ronald Reagan, who released a statement:

“Dr. Kerr’s untimely and tragic death at the hands of these despicable assassins must strengthen our resolve not to give in to the acts of terrorists. Terrorism must not be allowed to take control of the lives, actions, or future of ourselves and our friends.”

Malcolm Kerr’s death, on Jan. 18, 1984, would become national news — a dispatch on terrorism in a land roiled by strife, another in a long scroll of warnings about how religious beliefs would lead to violence there for decades to come — but before the story spread it was a simple fact that a team of young basketball players found difficult to believe, let alone begin to comprehend.

Pete Williams, a junior college transfer who would lead the team in scoring, remembers the night as a blur.

“There was a commotion, so much commotion, but I don’t remember much beyond that other than how shocked we were, how unreal it all felt,” he said. “We didn’t think about terrorism then. Ever.”

Even Kerr, who was born in Lebanon and had witnessed the civil war tearing the country apart, would later say he never imagined this sort of thing could happen to his family.

Players lingered on the balcony outside – the building was once a hotel – and stared out into the night, unsure of what to say or how to help their teammate move forward.

Kerr didn’t fly to Beirut for services after his father’s death.

Instead, he attended practice and played against Arizona State. He hit 5-of-7 shots in a 71-49 win. It was Kerr’s best game of his freshman season.

The Wildcats would win eight of their final 14 games to finish 11-17. Arizona hasn’t had a losing record since.

“A bunch of us gave him a nickname, and I don’t really know if it’s out there much,” said Brock Brunkhorst a guard on the team. “We called him Ice. Because that’s just how he was.”

Four years later, when Arizona State fans chanted derogatory comments about his father, he hit six 3-pointers in the first half.

He was just so [expletive] angry,” said Bruce Fraser, one of his best friends on the team and a current assistant with Golden State. “But that was Steve. He could turn it toward the court and win.”

By then Kerr had become an unlikely force in hauling Arizona from the bottom of Division I basketball to the Final Four, paving the path for Olson’s historic run.

Yet his teammates couldn’t imagine what was next.

Kerr’s 15-year NBA career, his five rings, the winning shot off a feed from Michael Jordan in the decisive game six of the 1997 finals, the career 45.4 percent shooting from 3-point, still the best in association history, none of that seemed remotely possible for the guard who’d used guile and a fierce competitive streak to fashion himself into a solid college player.

What they could have imagined, though, is Kerr as a head coach molding a talented team into a great one capable of playing for a championship. Kerr’s Golden State Warriors will do just that starting Thursday, when they face LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals.

He thought about the game at a high level and cared deeply about learning how to make disparate pieces come together. Coaching was his dream, too, he confided to teammates, though he figured he’d have to work his way through the college ranks after school.

But this is Kerr’s first season as a head coach, after two stints as a television analyst and one as the general manager of the Phoenix Suns.

The delay had everything to do with family.

“I think all along, Steve was waiting for his kids to grow up a little bit and spread out before he got back into coaching,” Fraser said. “He knew that being an analyst or even a GM didn’t really do it for him; it didn’t get him close enough to it. He had to have more at stake to feel fulfilled. He was right all along: He was made to be a coach.

“But he was never going to do that while his kids were younger and he could be around them. He had more chances than anybody knows about, and it never swayed him.

Two of Kerr’s three children are in college in California now; the fact that his daughter, Maddy plays volleyball at Cal was a factor in Kerr’s decision to spurn mentor Phil Jackson’s offer to coach the New York Knicks, Fraser said.

“He’s a doting father,” Fraser said. “His kids are everything to him. And I think that says a lot about how he felt about his own dad.

Kerr has not spoken frequently about his father, though he also has periodically used the league’s bright spotlight to echo Malcolm Kerr’s call for peace and understanding, as when he opposed the invasion of Iraq following the terrorist attacks of September 11.

Last month, he reflected on his father, telling the San Jose Mercury News“I feel his full impact on my whole life. It’s there every day.”

Kerr’s sister and mother both wrote books about dealing with Malcolm’s death, and his brother, Andrew, worked in national security and eventually uncovered details about who killed his father. Though several factions initially took credit for the murder, the family eventually traced it to Hezbollah, the Iranian-funded Islamic organization within Lebanon.

Though Kerr’s basketball career made him the most recognizable member of the family, he dealt with his grief mostly silently, as was usually his way.

Fraser believes it changed him in two ways immediately, though.

“It feels strange to say this, but I’ve thought about it for a while and I believe it,” he said. “I think the death of his father helped Steve as a basketball player, because he realized it was just basketball. He was more worldly than most of us already because of his background, but this changed his whole outlook.

With shooters, it’s all about how you respond to a missed shot. And for Steve, who is the most competitive person I know, there just wasn’t anything to get upset about anymore. The weight of a miss, the weight of a loss, the weight of a big moment … they just didn’t mean anything to him anymore.

“That, and his father’s death made him turn to the team as family. He became really vested in the players there and what Lute was trying to do.”

The Wildcats weren’t a particularly close team during Kerr’s first season. Olson was the third coach in as many years, and he’d built his first squad around two junior college transfers and a promising young guard named Michael Tait. He added Kerr – who had little interest from other Division I schools – after noticing him while scouting younger players.

Kerr’s signing at first seemed to underscore how dire things had become. He could shoot the ball but do little else. Athletically he wasn’t anywhere close to being Division I caliber, and the other players knew it. Kerr struggled in the team’s earliest pickup games, unable to keep up on offense or defense.

“I went back to my dorm room the first time we played and told my roommate, a team manager, that I couldn’t understand why this new coach would ever sign this guy,” Brunkhorst said.

Within the confines of Olson’s team-oriented system, though, Kerr began to flourish. Off the court, he gained the admiration of teammates with his self-deprecating sense of humor and relentless honesty.

“He was just a great dude, in every way,” Williams said. “You can say something good about somebody because they’re nice, but it was more than that with Steve, it went deeper. He wanted the best in you, to help you find it. And he hasn’t changed at all. That’s the amazing part.”

When Fraser rejoined Kerr with Golden State – he’d worked for him as a scout in Phoenix – he and other former Arizona players scoffed at the notion that Kerr wasn’t ready to be a head coach.

“I knew Harrison Barnes wasn’t happy with his role last year, and was thinking that he maybe should move on,” Fraser said. “So I asked him recently what happened to get him to stay.”

Kerr had flown to visit Barnes during the offseason, and the meeting went well.

“But I wasn’t sure why,” Fraser said. “Harrison just told me, ‘I asked him every difficult question I could think of, and he answered honestly. That’s all I want.’ ”

Kerr let the Warriors keep some traditions left over from former coach Mark Jackson, and even adopted some of his on-court strategy while working his own ideas – he’d been the beneficiary of the Triangle Offense in Chicago – into the mix. League MVP Steph Curry has heaped praise on Kerr for the way he’s handled the team.

Fraser and Kerr passed briefly at the team’s facility on Sunday morning, where both men were trying to keep busy as they waited for the series with the Cavaliers to begin. They had little to say to each other.

“I told him that after 30 years it had turned into a bad marriage,” Fraser said. “But at least we’re comfortable with silence.”

Fraser can’t recall ever talking to Kerr about his father’s death, or hearing him say anything beyond how much he appreciated Malcolm Kerr.

There was one way it did change their friendship, though slowly. Without stating it, they started opting for comedies instead of action movies whenever they went to the theater.

That way Kerr could sit peacefully, instead of wincing each time a gun went off on screen.

Steve Kerr – Leadership Lessons

By Mackey Craven
OpenView
Published On :- 2017-July-17th

Link

True leadership springs from a deep understanding of simple but profound tenets that can be successfully applied to any team scenario, whether the team in question is setting league records or building a company. Earlier this year, at OpenView’s CEO Forum, I had the chance to speak with one of the great leaders in sports today – Steve Kerr, head coach of the Golden State Warriors.

Kerr’s NBA career highlights reel features an impressive series of accomplishments. As a player, he was a five-time NBA champion with the Chicago Bulls (three rings) and the San Antonio Spurs (two rings). To date, his record for the highest career three-point percentage (45.4%) remains unbroken. Kerr’s winning streak continued when he transitioned into coaching. In his first season as head coach he led the Warriors to win the 2015 NBA Championship, in 2016 he was named NBA Coach of the Year as the Warriors set an NBA record 73-win season, and as of this article’s publication, the Warriors won another NBA Championship (congratulations!).

 

I talked with Kerr about his leadership style and philosophy given the parallels between his role and that of a startup CEO. Both coach and CEO work hard to get the most out of their teams – encouraging high-performing individuals to work together to win against an incredibly challenging field of competitors. Both are working in a fast-paced environment with high stakes, big personalities and many do-or-die moments.

My conversation with Kerr surfaced a number of insights that can help CEOs of expansion-stage software companies motivate and manage their teams more effectively so they can achieve the kind of dominance the Golden State Warriors see on the court.

Find your mentors, but be true to yourself

Kerr’s first observation about the most important leadership lessons he’s learned from his experience with the Warriors combined two, seemingly opposite ideas: seeking out mentors and being yourself. After he explained, however, the combination made complete sense.

“One of the things I did for a couple of years before I got the head coach job with the Warriors was to visit as many coaches as I could – especially the ones I admired – and really pick their brains, ” Kerr recalls. He met with legendary coaches including Phil Jackson, Gregg Popovich, Lute Olson, Lenny Wilkens and Pete Carroll. “I was able to get an in-depth look at their teams and staffs, and they shared with me the mistakes they’d made as young coaches as well as how they got better as they went along.”

But, even as Kerr was taking in all this wisdom from all these star coaches, he realized that no one person had all the right answers. “The main theme that came across over and over again in these conversations was be yourself,” he says. “There’s no point in trying to be someone else. You can emulate somebody else, but you can’t be someone else. As soon as you start quoting Vince Lombardi, players are going to know it’s fake.”

The bottom line is that while it’s wise to seek out and learn from mentors early on, you need to develop your own, authentic and genuine leadership philosophy and style.

Define your values

One of the most important pieces of advice that Kerr received while he was visiting with different mentors was to take the time to clearly define his philosophy, values and vision for the team. “One of the biggest things for me, as a coach, was the opportunity to implement the things that are most important to me and reflect my values,” Kerr explains. “Sharing those with your team and making those values part of your everyday existence in a way that comes from your heart is where you’ll find traction.”

Kerr got some great tactical tips on how to identify his values when he went to Seattle to sit in on a training camp with Pete Carroll, coach for the Seahawks. “Pete told me to take a look at my own personality and write down the ten most important values in my life,” Kerr says. “Then, he told me to take those ten values and whittle them down to four by really thinking about what would be most important to me as a coach.” Kerr came away from that exercise with four clearly defined values that he has used ever since to guide the Warriors on a daily basis:

Joy

“We are the luckiest people on earth,” Kerr says. “We play basketball for a living. People dream of that, so we never, ever want to lose sight of the fact that this has got to be fun. We make sure that’s reflected each day – we joke around, make fun of each other and include stupid videos in our strategy sessions. Our guys laugh quite a bit.”

Competitiveness

“Winning has to matter, and to win at this level, you’d better be competitive,” Kerr says. “It’s important to keep score constantly, to always keep track of who is winning and who is losing, even in practices. But,” he adds, with a nod to the value of joy, “do it in a fun way.”

Mindfulness

“One of the trickiest things for a pro athlete is finding the balance between over thinking and not paying attention. There’s a sweet spot where you’re dialed in, but still loose,” Kerr says. “We’re always trying to find that balance and have found that mindfulness training can help.”

Compassion

“Playing in the NBA is a dream job, but it’s a difficult one, relatively speaking. Our guys aren’t digging ditches, but they do get booed and traded and cut and injured. It’s not easy,” Kerr says. “Players worry about their careers. They lose sleep when they’re not playing well. So, compassion is a big deal.”

Get to know your team

Another big element of Kerr’s leadership style is strong relationships – real, person-to-person relationships based on compassion, trust and respect. “As soon as I’d accepted the job with the Warriors, I called each of our fifteen players and in many cases traveled to see them,” Kerr says, recalling how he even flew to Australia to visit Andrew Bogut. “I wanted to make sure that I got to know each player on a personal level – find out about their families, who they are and what makes them tick.”

Kerr had learned this technique from coaches he’d played for and admired, including Popovich and Jackson. “I knew those guys cared about me because they went out of their way to find out about my kids and my wife and what I like to do in my free time,” Kerr recalls. “And once you know that they really care about you, then when they yell at you, it’s very acceptable.”

This initial “tour” to meet his players was a great chance for Kerr to spend quality time with his team, but it was also an opportunity for him to lay the initial groundwork for his vision. “I wanted to have my message really well put together for them, both individually and team-wise,” he says. “I wanted to be able to establish what we were looking to do as a team, our goals and where I saw each player fitting in before we even got on the practice floor.”

“It’s really important,” Kerr sums up, “for people underneath you to recognize that you care about them and that they are valued.”

Study your team’s strengths and weaknesses

Of course, an important part of getting to know your team is being able to assess their strengths and weaknesses. “In basketball, you try to be the best you can be based on your talent,” Kerr explains. “In the off-season you assess your weaknesses – which player can we get to fill that hole or to really strengthen a particular position. And then you play, and figure out how good you are.”

At the same time, you need to constantly assess the competition. “Each time you play a team, you are trying to find their weak spot and how do exploit it,” Kerr says. “And, on the flip side, you are also trying to protect your own weaknesses, knowing that other teams will be coming after you in those areas. It’s a constant process of evaluating where you are against the other teams.”

While evaluating your team is an important leadership role, it’s important to approach it with humility and respect. This becomes even more important when you’re heading up a group of high-performing individuals who are already extremely talented in their own right. “I was lucky to inherit a team that was skilled and talented, and it was important to acknowledge that,” Kerr says about when he initially joined the Warriors. “When I took the job, they had already won fifty games the previous year. We needed to come in as staff saying that we knew they were already good, but that we wanted to help them take the next step. The team appreciated that we came in with some humility.” And from there, the focus was on how they could all get better together.

This approach had a far-reaching effect not only on the existing team, but also in terms of recruiting. “One of the reasons we got Kevin Durant was that he had seen our culture from afar,” Kerr says. “He saw our desire to get better and work together. And he saw the fun we were having.”

Empower your team to take ownership

In 2016, Kerr missed the first half of the season – approximately forty games – due to a serious back injury. Despite not having their head coach on the sidelines, the Warriors had the best regular season record of all time in the NBA. While Kerr wasn’t happy about having to miss those games, his feelings are mitigated by the pride he felt in his team’s ability and performance.

“It’s almost like being a parent,” Kerr says. “You’re kids are getting older and you’re no longer telling them what to do all the time, but they’re still doing well. That’s when you know you’ve done a good job as a parent; and that’s kind of how I feel about coaching in general. I actually took a lot of pride in the fact that the team was doing so well while I was out because I recognized that the process had really performed from the previous year, and we were able to carry that over. That’s ultimately what you want.”

Getting to that point of team strength and capability takes a lot of work. “At the beginning of the season, it’s the coach’s job to lay out the vision for the team, but by the end of the season it’s the players’ team,” Kerr explains. “I might call a timeout once in awhile, or draw up a play; but most games, I just sit back and the players play. It’s their team. It’s our job to empower them and get them on the right track so they are equipped to take ownership.”

That’s kind of the end game for any leader – getting the team to take ownership of the plays. It’s the leader’s job to deliver the right vision, create the right environment, and provide the right guidance so that each team member can reach his or her highest potential. Sometimes, that takes some cheerleading, and sometimes it takes some constructive criticism. “Some people need a pat on the back, and others need a kick in the tail,” Kerr says. “I ask my staff all the time what each player needs – a confidence boost or a sharp stick.”

For the Warriors, Kerr has the team meet to watch and critique film each day for ten minutes before practice. “We go over what we are trying to accomplish as a group in a very practical way,” he adds. “The cheerleading comes in behind the scenes. If I were to constantly tell the team how great they are, it would be almost patronizing. But, it’s good for me to tell an individual player when they are doing great work. You need to be able to recognize what each person needs to hear and when they need to hear it. Each person is unique and each day is a little different.”

Steve Kerr On Leadership

Background

Life gives a few the opportunity to speak about the consternation, wrath, and burden of leadership, Steve Kerr happens to be one of those that faith places in the crosshair of leadership.

 

Video

  1. YouTube
    • First Impressions
      • Steve Kerr’s First Interaction with Michael Jordan
        Link
    • Gaining Respect
      • Michael Jordan talks about punching Steve Kerr in the face
        Link

Images

Punched in the Face by His Airness

Steve Kerr’s take

Phil Jackson’s Take

Story

STEVE KERR (AS TOLD TO CHRIS BALLARD)

Link
Sunday September 24th, 2017

We knew it was coming.

After Steph spoke up at media day on Friday, we figured it was just a matter of time until the president responded. Then on Saturday morning my wife, Margot, woke me up. “Here it is,” she said, and showed me Trump’s tweet. Our invitation, he wrote, “has been withdrawn” because, “going to the White House is considered a great honor for a championship team” and, “Stephen Curry is hesitating.”

First off, I’m pretty sure Steph wasn’t “hesitating”. He made it clear he wouldn’t go. Second, as I joked to the media Saturday, it was like the president was trying to break up with us before we broke up with him.

Regardless, it’s a shame. I’ve been fortunate enough to meet President Reagan, both Bushes, Clinton, and Obama. I didn’t agree with all of them, but it was easy to set politics aside because each possessed an inherent respect for the office, as well as the humility that comes with being a public servant in an incredible position of power, representing 300 million people. And that’s the problem now. In his tweet to Steph, Trump talked about honoring the White House but, really, isn’t it you who must honor the White House, Mr. President? And the way to do that is through compassion and dignity and being above the fray. Not causing the fray.

Would we have gone? Probably not. The truth is we all struggled with the idea of spending time with a man who has offended us with his words and actions time and again. But I can tell you one thing: it wouldn’t have been for the traditional ceremony, to shake hands and smile for cameras. Internally, we’d discussed whether it’d be possible to just go and meet as private citizens and have a serious, poignant discussion about some of the issues we’re concerned about. But he’s made it hard for any of us to actually enter the White House, because what’s going on is not normal. It’s childish stuff: belittling people and calling them names. So to expect to go in and have a civil, serious discourse? Yeah, that’s probably not going to happen.

Look, I’m a basketball coach and what I do obviously pales in comparison to what the president does. But our jobs are similar in at least one respect: If you want to be an NBA coach, you need to be prepared to be criticized. You kind of know that going in. If I coach poorly and we lose the game, I hear about it. That’s okay. It’s really where we coaches earn our money, accepting and dealing with criticism and keeping the ship moving forward. There has to be an inherent understanding when you enter into any public position of power that this is what happens. People are going to take shots at you and it’s incumbent upon you to absorb those shots. Maybe you respond diplomatically, but you maintain a level of respect and dignity. What you can’t do is just angrily lash out. Can you imagine if I lashed out at all my critics every day and belittled them? I’d lose my players, I’d embarrass ownership, I’d embarrass myself. Pretty soon I’d be out of a job. It’s a basic adult thing that you learn as you grow up: People aren’t always going to agree with you. And that’s OK.

Instead, we get Trump’s comments over the weekend about NFL players, calling them ‘sons of bitches’ for kneeling during the anthem. Those just crushed me. Crushed me. Just think about what those players are protesting. They’re protesting excessive police violence and racial inequality. Those are really good things to fight against. And they’re doing it in a nonviolent way. Which is everything that Martin Luther King preached, right? A lot of American military members will tell you that the right to free speech is exactly what they fight for. And it’s just really, really upsetting that the leader of our country is calling for these players to be ‘fired.’

The hard part is knowing what to do now. Margot and I talked for a long time Saturday morning about what to say publicly. I’ve probably been as critical of Trump as anybody but maybe it’s time to take a different course. There’s no need to get into a war of words. It’s about trying to hang on to the values that are important to us as an organization, a country, and, really, as human beings.

The fact is we live in an amazing country, but it’s a flawed one. I consider myself unbelievably lucky to live here, so please spare me the ‘If you don’t like it you can get out’ argument. I love living here. I love my country. I just think it’s important to recognize that we as a nation are far from perfect, and it’s our responsibility to try to make it better. And one of the ways to do that is to promote awareness and understanding and acceptance. Not just acceptance but embracing our diversity, which when you get down to it is not only who we are but truly what makes us great. And it’s not happening.

Remember, the president works for us, not vice versa. We elected him. He doesn’t just work for his constituents and his base. He works for every citizen. Once you take that office, you have to do what’s best for the entire country. Sure, you’re going to have policies that align with your party, but that’s not the point. Respectfully, Mr. Trump, the point is this: You’re the president. You represent all of us. Don’t divide us.

Bring us together.

The Fifth Estate

Background

About the fifth estate : For four decades the fifth estate has been Canada’s premier investigative documentary program. Hosts Bob McKeown, Gillian Findlay and Mark Kelley continue a tradition of provocative and fearless journalism. the fifth estate brings in-depth investigations that matter to Canadians – delivering a dazzling parade of political leaders, controversial characters and ordinary people whose lives were touched by triumph or tragedy.

 

Videos

  1. Russell Williams – Above Suspicion – the fifth estate
    • Participants
      • Mary Elizabeth ( Spouse )
      • Larry Jones ( Neighbor )
      • Jeff Farquhar ( College Roommate )
    • Bio
      • He piloted prime ministers and royalty and later commanded our country’s largest air force base in Trenton, Ont. Today, Colonel Russell Williams sits in a prison cell convicted of multiple charges including two murders, sexual assaults and dozens of break and enters. This unbelievable story has captured the country’s attention and left people asking the same simple questions: What really happened? Who is the man behind the headlines? To answer these questions, the team from the fifth estate conducted an exhaustive journalistic investigation over many months as they chased down a multitude of leads, knocked on countless doors and asked many difficult questions of the people who agreed to talk. In exclusive interviews with those who know him best, host Bob McKeown reveals, in intricate detail, the story of Colonel Russell Williams — career military man, respected community leader, husband and, now, convicted murderer.
        Original airdate : September 24th, 2010
    •  Videos
      • YouTube
        • Russell Williams – Above Suspicion – the fifth estate
          Published On :- 2015-Sept-5th
          Link
        • Russell Williams – The Confession – the fifth estate
          Bob McKeown deconstructs the interrogation and shocking confession of Russell Williams. From his initial denial to the full declaration of guilt, the fifth estate deciphers one of the most compelling and distressing confessions in Canadian criminal history with the help of people who know the art of interrogation better than anyone else. For many months, the fifth estate has been following the story of Russell Williams and now is able to piece it together from the early clues to the final confession.
          Published on :- 2014-Sept-5th
          Link
    • Location :-
      • Canadian Forces Base ( CFB Military Base )
        Tweed, Ontario
  2. Shafia family murders : House of Shafia (2012) – the fifth estate
    A father, a mother and a brother stand convicted of the first-degree murders of four women found drowned in a submerged car in a Kingston, Ont. canal — the so-called “honour killing” that has shocked a nation. But so many questions still remain.

    • Videos
      • YouTube
        Published on :- 2016-June-27th
        Link
  3. The Life and Death of Abdinasir Dirie (2010) – the fifth estate
    In the 1990s, Abdinasir Dirie’s parents fled civil war in Somalia for the apparent peace and safety of Canada. Years later, G Baby, as his family called him, made his own way from the rough streets of Toronto’s Jamestown Crescent neighbourhood to the oilfields of Alberta looking for riches and good fortune. There, he died and his murder remains unsolved, like so many other murders of young Somali-Canadians. The extra twist in this case: some members of his family are convinced they know who committed the crime.Hear from the family of Abdinasir Dirie as the fifth estate explores the searing pain of their struggle and peels back the layers of a story even more complicated than anyone originally expected.

    • Videos
  4. Jassi Sidhu Murder
    • Chronicle
      • 2017-09-08
        • Sept 8, 2017 : A B.C. woman and her brother, accused of masterminding the murder of her 25-year-old Jassi Sidhu, should be extradited to India to face justice, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled.
    •  Videos
      • YouTube
        • Jassi Sidhu murder : Escape from Justice (2012) – The Fifth Estate
          Link
  5. Murder in Cottage Country – The Fifth Estate
    • Added On :- 2017-Sept-20th
    •  Videos
      • YouTube
        • Murder in Cottage Country – The Fifth Estate
          It’s a dark tale of people vanishing, mystery, and suspicion of murder: Nearly two decades ago in a secluded part of Ontario’s cottage country, four elderly people disappeared without a trace. Police spent years searching for bodies, clues and answers. To this day, the seniors have never been found — and no one has been held accountable for their disappearance. Now, in a joint investigation with The Walrus magazine, The Fifth Estate uncovers long-secret police documents and new details about the people who went missing, the suspects police had in their sights and clues to what may have happened.
          Published On :- 2017-Sept-15th
          Link

 

Indepth

Russell Williams

Russell Williams – Above Suspicion – the fifth estate

  • Psychology
    • Unpredictability of Human Behavior
    • Under Radar
    • Under cover of darkness
  • Timeline
    • 15 Years Old
      • January 2009
    • 2008 thru 2009
      • 34 similar breakings
    • Ottawa
      • Peculiar in nature
  • Commanding Officer at CFB Trenton
    • Qualification for position
      • Good with people
        • Good as a leader of people
      • Good with Administration
      • Good with the media
      • Good with the public
  • Breakdown
    • Suicide Attempt
    • Psychological World broken down

Russell Williams – The Confession – the fifth estate

  1.  Conversation
    • It is hard to believe this is happening
    • What are you struggling with
    • Struggling with how upset my life is right now