Giannis Antetokounmpo

NBA All Star 2017

Good to see that the NBA All Star list for 2017 has a whole lot of good guys on it.

nbaallstar2017

Homelessness

  1. Young, gifted, and Homelessness
    More than 100,000 students on U.S. youth, public school and college teams have no stable place to live. Sports Illustrated goes inside the lives of three teen athletes struggling to overcome the hardships of homelessness.
    Published On :- 2014-Oct-16th
    Link

 

Stories

Giannis Antetokounmpo: The Most Intriguing Point Guard In NBA History
Link

On the worst nights, when the fadeaways are short and the pocket passes are late, Giannis Antetokounmpo skips the showers. He storms out of the Bradley Center in full uniform, from home locker room to player parking lot, and hops into the black Explorer the local Ford dealer lent him. He turns right on North 4th Street in downtown Milwaukee, steers toward the Hoan Bridge and continues six miles south to the Catholic seminary in St. Francis, where the priests pray and the Bucks train and The Freak dispenses his rage. Alone, Antetokounmpo reenacts the game he just played, every shot he clanked and every read he missed. Sometimes, he leaves by 1 a.m. Other times, he stays until three, sweating through his white jersey for a second time. “I get so mad, and if I go right home, I’m afraid I’ll never get that anger out,” Antetokounmpo says. “This is how I get the anger away.”

He used to administer his form of self-flagellation on the court, because that’s what he saw Chris Paul do after a Clippers loss in L.A. But he noticed some fans lingering in the lower bowl with their cellphone cameras and he didn’t want anybody to think he was putting on a show. So he retreats, in space and time. Here he is not the $100 million man with the catchy nickname and the barrel chest who studies Magic Johnson’s fast breaks and Russell Westbrook’s mean mugs, who wrestles LeBron and mimes Dirk, who hears MVP chants and references 40-balls. Here he is not even the spring-loaded first-round pick who arrived wide-eyed in the United States three and a half years ago, tweeting breathlessly about his first smoothie, refusing to use the auto-pump feature on his gas nozzle because he was so excited to pump it himself, chirping after a burger at In-N-Out in Westwood Village: “This is America right here! The real America! Isn’t it beautiful?”

No, here he is the lanky hustler from Athens, peddling watches, sunglasses, toys and video games, on the streets near the Acropolis while his parents feared that police would demand their papers and deport them back to Africa. Much of his backstory has been told, how Charles and Veronica Antetokounmpo emigrated from Nigeria to Greece in 1991 for a better life, had four boys there, and bounced from one eviction notice to another. But the further Giannis gets from his childhood, the more it resonates, in different ways. “I can’t push it to the side,” Antetokounmpo explains. “I can’t say, ‘I’ve made it, I’m done with all that.’ I will always carry it with me. It’s where I learned to work like this.” He could sell all day, serenade tourists with Christmas carols at night, and return home without enough cash for dinner. Still, he laments, “The results were never guaranteed.” Therein he finds the biggest difference between his life then and now. “If I work here,” he says, “I get the results. That’s the greatest feeling ever for me.” It keeps him coming back to the gym—straight from the arena after losses, straight from the airport after road trips, straight from the bed after back-to-backs.

Antetokounmpo stands 6’ 11″, with legs so long opposing coaches constantly complain that he is traveling, until they review the tape. “He’s not,” says Wizards coach Scott Brooks. “It’s just that we’ve never seen somebody with a stride like this.” Among the NBA’s legion of stretchy giants, Kevin Durant is the scorer, Anthony Davis the slasher. Antetokounmpo is the creator, traversing half the court with four Sasquatch steps, surveying traffic like a big rig over smart cars. Durant and Davis try to play point guard. Antetokounmpo actually does it, dropping dimes over and around defenders’ heads, leading the Bucks in every major category; 23.8 points, 8.9 rebounds, 5.9 assists, 2.0 blocks and 2.0 steals. This season he will be the team’s first All-Star since Michael Redd in 2004, and before you learn to spell his surname, he will be much more.

Growing up, his customers occasionally mentioned his cartoonishly long limbs, but he shrugged. He didn’t need a 7’ 3″ wingspan. He needed a sucker to buy those knockoff shades. He viewed himself less as The Greek Freak than a Greek grinder. “I didn’t really look at my body and think about what it meant,” Antetokounmpo says. “I didn’t figure it out.” He glances down at his 12-inch hands, bigger than Kawhi Leonard’s, bigger than Wilt Chamberlain’s. He finally knows those names. “A lot of players will tell you, ‘When I was a kid, I watched Kobe Bryant, Michael Jordan, LeBron, Magic, and I wanted to be just like them,’ ” Antetokounmpo says. “For me it wasn’t like that at all.” He laughs, because at last he grasps the magnitude of his gifts and the ways they can be unleashed. He understands that a 22-year-old with his build and his drive should never go home hungry again.

Antetokounmpo lives in a modest three-story townhouse near Saint Francis de Sales Seminary, in the same complex as his parents. Like any hoop phenom, he subsists on Wingstop and NBA TV. But when he needs to steady himself amid his unimpeded ascent, he heads west to Omega restaurant, where 24 hours a day he can order gyros and lamb chops with sides of nostalgia and perspective. “I think about where I was four years ago, on the streets, and where I am today, able to take care of my kids and my grandkids and their grandkids,” Antetokounmpo marvels. “I’m not saying that in a cocky way or a disrespectful way. But it is a crazy story, isn’t it?”

On March 28, 2013, Bucks general manager John Hammond sat in a dining room at the Bradley Center before a game against the Lakers and explained why his team could not acquire a superstar. Hammond was in his fifth season, with a record of 181–206, never good enough to contend and never bad enough to tank. The stars he had brought to Milwaukee, if you can call them that, were Brandon Jennings, Monta Ellis, John Salmons and Carlos Delfino. Hammond outlined the two most obvious ways to land a prospective headliner: Finish on the fringe of the lottery and turn a lucky Ping-Pong ball into the first overall draft pick, which has about a 1.8% chance of occurring. Or pitch a premier free agent on a small market with a frigid climate and a mediocre roster, which comes with even steeper odds.

At the end of an otherwise dispiriting conversation, Hammond mentioned casually that he was leaving town the next day. “Where are you going?” I asked.

“Greece,” he said.

Memories of the trip have become blurred in the recounting: Antetokounmpo’s coach, idling outside the gym on a scooter, smoking a cigarette; Antetokounmpo’s teammates, nearly twice his age, coming straight to pregame warmups from their day jobs; Antetokounmpo’s parents, sitting high in the stands, as their beanstalk son deftly ran the point for Filathlitikos in the Greek second division. Hammond flashed back to a line that coach Larry Brown once told him. “For some people the game goes 110 miles per hour. For others, it goes 70.” Afterward Antetokounmpo’s Greek agents drove Hammond through Athens. “I don’t know what’s going to happen to this guy,” the GM said from the backseat. “But his life is about to change in a major way.”

The 18-year-old Antetokounmpo was no secret among scouts, but many organizations were scared to draft him, given that he couldn’t even score an invitation to the Nike Hoop Summit. But Hammond, desperate for that elusive star, was ready to take a risk. The Bucks picked Antetokounmpo 15th overall in 2013, recognizing that there is yet another way to secure a difference-maker: Steal him.

The day after the draft Antetokounmpo walked out of the elevator at The Pfister Hotel in downtown Milwaukee, where former Wisconsin senator and Bucks owner Herb Kohl was coincidentally sitting in the lobby coffee shop. Antetokounmpo was self-conscious about his broken English, but Kohl’s top lieutenant, JoAnne Anton, happened to be fluent in Greek. “I remember how his eyes lit up when he heard her voice,” Hammond recalls. “It was a small thing, but you couldn’t help but think, ‘Maybe this is meant to be.’”

So began an endearing affair between Antetokounmpo and Milwaukee. He moved into a two-and-a-half-bedroom apartment in St. Francis that he shared with his parents and younger brothers, Kostas and Alex. Bucks guard O.J. Mayo sent him a U-Haul filled with furniture. Caron Butler and Zaza Pachulia helped him pick out clothes for road trips. Hammond and assistant general manager David Morway taught him to drive, parallel parking on the seminary grounds, and assistant video coordinator Ross Geiger lent him his maroon Subaru Outback Legacy. Geiger was Antetokounmpo’s best friend in Milwaukee, the one who oversaw his graduation from EDM to hip-hop, and instructed him on which lyrics he could sing in public and which he could not. But when they ate dinner, even at McDonald’s, Antetokounmpo insisted on splitting the bill. Either he didn’t comprehend how much more he earned than a video guy, or he couldn’t bear to part with the cash.

Milwaukee went 15–67 in Antetokounmpo’s rookie season, which dampened his enthusiasm not a bit. He memorized lines from Coming to America and Next Friday. He learned to throw a football with Morway’s sons, Michael and Robbie. He begged teammates to play the shooting game two-for-a-dollar that he picked up from power forward John Henson. When a Greek TV station came to visit, he told Geiger they would need a customized handshake, “so we look like we know what we’re doing.” The Bucks were brutal, and The Greek Freak averaged only 6.8 points, a reserve small forward who spent most of his time marooned in the corner, probing for open spaces and put-back dunks. But he provided highlights and hope. “I love Milwaukee!” Antetokounmpo told teammates over lunch at the facility one day. “I’m going to be in Milwaukee 20 years! I’ll be here so long they’ll be sick of me!” He feared that somebody would wake him from his dream and send him home. “That they’d take it all away from me,” he says.

To Bucks vets, Antetokounmpo supplied comic relief during a dismal winter, but Geiger sensed he was capable of more. One night they were watching a game on television when Antetokounmpo shouted, “Whoa! Did you see that?” Geiger hit rewind. Antetokounmpo was always amazed he could rewind live TV. “There it is!” Antetokounmpo yelped. “Look at the action on the help side and how that opens up the whole play!” Another night Geiger invited him to dinner at a friend’s house and Antetokounmpo barely uttered a word. On the way home, he told Geiger, “You’re really close with Erik, but you’re not that close with Matt.”

“He was right,” Geiger says. “He knows how to read people and situations. That’s because of how he grew up. He couldn’t waste his time selling you something for five minutes if you weren’t going to buy. He had to read body language and move on.”

When Antetokounmpo reminisces about his rookie year, he sounds as if he is talking about another era and another person. “I was like a kid in the park, seeing all the cities, seeing LeBron and KD, having so much fun. But that kid—the kid with the smoothies—I’m not really that kid anymore.”


Pro sports age everybody. There was the night in his first season when Antetokounmpo’s agent at Octagon, Alex Saratsis, told him that a Bucks assistant coach believed he wasn’t working hard enough. “You can tell me I’m not playing well,” Antetokounmpo replied, tears in his eyes. “You can tell me I’m not doing the right things. But you cannot tell me this. I won’t accept it.” And there was the night in his second season when the Bucks’ new head coach, Jason Kidd, banned him from shooting three-pointers. “I want to shoot threes,” Antetokounmpo argued. “How can I not shoot threes?” Geiger left for the Suns. Morway went to the Jazz. Nate Wolters, Antetokounmpo’s best friend on the team, was waived. “I didn’t know all that would happen,” Antetokounmpo says. “You build these relationships, know these people, and then all of a sudden you get a text in the summer: ‘I’m not coming back.’ What? You get mad. You learn this is a business.”

The first time Kidd benched him, Antetokounmpo was irate. “I was like, ‘Let’s see what this guy did in his career, anyway,’ ” Antetokounmpo recounts, and called up Kidd’s bio on his phone. “I saw Rookie of the Year, NBA championship, USA Olympic gold medal, second in assists, fifth in made threes, blah, blah, blah. I was like, ‘Jesus freaking Christ, how can I compete with that? I better zip it.’ ”

At 6’ 4″, Kidd is one of the best point guards who ever lived. “But I wanted so badly to be 6’ 7″ or 6’ 8″,” Kidd says. “Guys like Magic are looking through a window that’s so high. They can make passes I could only dream about.” He detected enough playmaking ability from Antetokounmpo to try him at point guard in the 2014 summer league and again in the ’15 preseason, but he wasn’t satisfied with the results. Last Feb. 20 in Atlanta, with the Bucks 11 games under .500 and Michael Carter-Williams coming off the bench, Kidd put the ball in Antetokounmpo’s massive mitts. “We didn’t talk about it,” Kidd says. “We didn’t make a big deal out of it. There was no pressure. We just wanted to try something different.”

The Bucks won that night in double overtime as Antetokounmpo had 19 points and three assists, and afterward Kidd embarked on an audacious experiment: building the biggest point guard anybody can remember. Kidd oversees the project, but assistant coach Sean Sweeney runs it, accompanying Antetokounmpo to his midnight workouts, deconstructing his pick-and-rolls, furnishing him with clips of Magic but also less predictable influences such as Kiki Vandeweghe’s post moves and Shawn Kemp’s transition dunks. Antetokounmpo hung a photo of himself, facing up against the Raptors, in Sweeney’s office. Sweeney has repeatedly taken the picture down, but somehow, it always returns. “Don’t forget about me!” Antetokounmpo sings.

This summer they worked out twice a day for two-and-a-half weeks at Long Beach State’s Walter Pyramid, picking strangers out of the bleachers to fill fast breaks. “It was an inordinate amount of time going through situations,” Sweeney says. “We’d start with the running game. ‘First look is to the big running to the rim. Next look is up the side to the wing. Next look is across the side. Now can you get it and go full speed? Now you can get it and go and pitch it back to a trailer who can shoot?’ ”

“You know what I liked about using all those strangers?” Kidd adds. “He had to speak. You don’t know these people, but you have to tell them what to do. They’re looking at you for direction and you have to give it to them. That’s what a point guard does. He has to know his teammates better than they know themselves.”

The Bucks acquired Matthew Dellavedova in July and made him their de facto floor general, but Giannis is the one making the decisions and feeling the consequences. “If this guy gets the ball five times, I know he’s happy, and if that guy gets it once, I know he’s not,” Antetokounmpo groans. “So I’m like, ‘Oh, man, I’ve got to get that guy the ball.’ It’s hard to satisfy everybody.”

Actually, it’s impossible, which is another of the lessons Kidd is imparting. There are things stars do, like pick up the bill at McDonald’s, and things they don’t, like placate everyone in their presence. “To make the next step, I’ve learned you need a little cockiness inside you,” Antetokounmpo says. “I can be a little cocky.” As a rookie, he jawed with Carmelo Anthony. In his second season, he body checked Mike Dunleavy. But the Bucks have been seeing his snarl more often of late, after pep talks from Kobe Bryant last season and Kevin Garnett last month, as well as daily skull sessions with veteran Bucks guard Jason Terry. “I’ll tell him something at a timeout like, ‘Watch the curl, and if the curl isn’t there, the slip will be wide open,’ ” says Terry. “And he’ll always tell me, ‘I got you, bro.’ ” He searches for the slightest edge, because a highlight a night is not enough anymore. He needs 25/12/8 with a win. “I’ve definitely become more serious,” Antetokounmpo says. “I have a franchise on my shoulders.”

On 28-And-a-half acres around the Bradley Center, the Bucks are constructing a new practice facility that will open later this year and a new arena that will open next year. Next to the site is a billboard, featuring Antetokounmpo’s muscled back, over the slogan the future looks strong. Hammond, it turns out, proved himself wrong, and possibly twice. He found a star, and he might have snagged another, drafting forward Jabari Parker second in 2014. The Bucks currently sit seventh in the East, but outside of Cleveland, their long-term outlook is as bright as anybody’s.

Hammond and Antetokounmpo talk often, though no longer about the perils of right turns on red. “He’s trying to figure this whole thing out, what he’s going to be,” Hammond says. “We’re seeing this more focused side of him, but it’s a fine line. You still want to enjoy the game, the fun part of it.” His trust is difficult to earn. Private trainers with renowned NBA clients offer to work with Antetokounmpo every summer. He turns them all down, sticking with Bucks staffers.

“Because my parents were illegal, they couldn’t trust anybody,” Antetokounmpo says. “They were always nervous. A neighbor could be like, ‘These people are making too much noise, their children are making too much noise,’ and the cops could knock at our door and ask for our papers and that’s it. It’s that simple. So you’re always a little closed. I’m outgoing when I feel comfortable, but it took me 21 years just to invite a girl to meet my friends. I’m closed too.”

Around familiar faces, like his live-in girlfriend, his innocence is impossible to extinguish. When Saratsis mentions the All-Star Game, Antetokounmpo hushes him, so as not to jinx it. When Geiger visits, Antetokounmpo hands him the Wingstop menu, with the addendum, “I’m buying!” And when Kostas left home for the University of Dayton this fall, big brother drove six hours to move him into his dorm, stopping only at Wal-Mart. “Here is Giannis at midnight, with 80% of the freshman class, walking up and down the hallway carrying bedsheets,” recalls Dayton coach Archie Miller.

Giannis functions as the family patriarch, with his father adjusting to the United States and his older brother, Thanasis, playing in Spain. When Giannis inked his four-year, $100 million extension in September—after postponing the signing by four hours to accommodate a morning workout—he called Bucks co-owner Wes Edens at his hotel in Ireland. “I just wanted to say thank you for the money,” Antetokounmpo started. “It means so much to me and my family. I’m going to work very hard for it.” Then he offered to buy friends and family steak at the Capital Grille in Milwaukee for lunch. When the meat arrived, with appetizers and side dishes, Giannis looked alarmed. “I don’t know who’s paying for all this,” he cracked, “because I only said I’d get the steak.”

Three months later he walks into the practice gym the morning after a home-and-home with the Cavaliers, 76 minutes in close proximity to LeBron James. “You feel different after you play him,” Antetokounmpo reports. “Your legs, your body, you’re sore everywhere. Sometimes you have to lie to yourself, lie to your mother: ‘Yeah, I’m good, I’m good.’ ” The team has the day off. “But where else do I have to be?” he asks. He plays two-on-two. He shoots along the arc with Sweeney. Rookie Thon Maker mops the floor. Antetokounmpo’s three-point percentage, 29.3 this season, right around his career mark, is still the source of much consternation. Judging by his practice sessions, it will spike soon, and then there won’t be any way left to defend him. “When I’m coaching,” muses the 39-year-old Terry, “he’ll be pretty much unguardable.”

The next night, against Washington, Antetokounmpo starts the game with a reverse layup, a midrange pull-up, a pair of sweeping hooks and finger rolls. The Wizards can’t keep him out of the lane or off the free throw line. He dunks off a Eurostep, a lob, a back-cut and a put-back. He dunks over Kelly Oubre, Otto Porter and Markieff Morris, flexing as they wince. When Morris fouls him hard on a breakaway, Antetokounmpo sprints over to ask him about it. He has 24 points in the first half, Milwaukee has 73, and the Cream City Clash in Section 222 chant: “Can’t Stop Gian-nis!” He looks as long as Durant, as strong as Davis, as ferocious as Westbrook. He’s got Dirk’s fadeaway, with the right knee raised, and a nifty two-handed scoop all his own.

He finds Parker for a dunk and a layup, Henson for a layup, Dellavedova for a short J. Leading the break, he whips a pass to Terry in the corner for three. I got you, bro. In the post he backs down a trio of Wizards and kicks out to Malcolm Brogdon for another three. With 6:26 left he stands on the free throw line, and the locals break out a rare MVP chant. He has a career-high 39 points. He craves the 40-ball. He tries to settle himself, but the second free throw rims out, and Kidd calls him to the bench. The Bucks lead by 27, which will be their final margin. He winks at Alex, his youngest brother, behind the courtside seats.

In the locker room afterward, players scatter for Christmas, two days away. “Stay out of the gym!” swingman Tony Snell cautions, and Antetokounmpo surreptitiously shakes his head. “I don’t know,” he mutters. A few minutes later the black Explorer turns right on North 4th Street, toward the snow-covered bridge, taking the league’s most unlikely driver to a place only he can see.ic fever dream that is Giannis Antetokounmpo on a basketball court. Basketball fans now call him “The Greek Freak,” a name he’s fully earned with his play.

Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of Antetokounmpo’s dizzying skill-set is exemplified in those passes. At the end of last season, with the playoffs out of reach, Bucks coach Jason Kidd began experimentally playing the 6-foot-11 Antetokounmpo, who has the height of a center, at point guard.

The results were exhilarating for Bucks fans, and terrifying for the rest of the league. In the team’s final 26 games last season, Antetokounmpo registered five triple doubles, two more than any Bucks player had ever registered in a full season, according to Fox Sports Wisconsin. He averaged 18.8 points, 8.4 rebounds, 7.5 assists and 1.9 blocks per game — eye-popping numbers for any NBA player, let alone a 21-year-old who not long ago was playing in Greece’s second division.

But those days — like the days of wondering whether the family fridge would be full or empty — are now a world away.

“It’s a wonderful feeling. I can’t describe how excited I feel, you know,” Antetokounmpo told Sager on draft day in 2013. “It’s a dream come true.”

 

References

  1. Stories
    • Sam Liard :- Marshable.Com
      • The NBA’s newest $100 million man is someone whose story you can’t help but love
        Link
    • Associated Press
      • Greek federation: Remarks ‘racist’
        Link
    • The Undefeated
      • Marc J. Spears
        • Giannis Antetokounmpo’s first NBA All-Star appearance is just the first step in a promising career
          Link
    • Adam Paris :- Brew Hoop.com
      • On The Rise: A Tale of Two NBA Cities
        The Philadelphia 76ers and Milwaukee Bucks might seem to have little in common, but there’s more similarities than meets the eye.
        Link
  2. Interview
    • The Greek Freak Is Back For Round Two: The Cusp
      Link
    • The Starters: When “Greek Meets Freak”
      Link
  3. NBA Players
    • NBA Players on Giannis Antetokounmpo
      Link
  4. Dunk Contest
    • 2015
      • Thanasis Antetokounmpo dunks over brother Giannis
        Link
      • Giannis Antetokounmpo Top 10 Dunks Of His Career!
        Link

Loyal Rue – IN LIGHT OF SCIENCE, LET’S BEGIN ANEW WITH A ‘NOBLE LIE’, PHILOSOPHER SAYS

Loyal Rue

Loyal Rue is a philosopher who is questioning the Christian Worldview based on new revelations that is arising from Science.

I first became aware of Mr. Rue and his views based on listening to Ravi Zacharias and others from RZIM.

 

Noble Lie

George W. Cornell, AP religion writer
Published On 2001-Jan-20th
Link


Religious philosopher Loyal D. Rue says modern culture urgently needs a “noble lie” – a myth that links the moral teachings of religion with the scientific facts of life.

He said science “has eroded the plausibility of the Judeo-Christian myths. It has got into our heads and consciousness in such a way that the traditional myths can’t be swallowed.”The myths, he said, include archaic views of the universe; a presumption that humans are at the center of existence; and the stories of Jesus’ resurrection and of Moses bringing God’s Ten Commandments down from a mountain.

Dispel the myths of religion, he said, and all that is left is nihilism, which considers life and the universe meaningless.

“Nihilism is not something that can be argued away. . . . ,” he said. “I assume it’s true. But it is ultimately destructive,” a “monstrous truth.”

The myths served as a framework for religious teachings that brought about man’s betterment, Rue says. Without their “integration of cosmology and morality” – of cosmic facts with idealism – people will deny fixed standards and do whatever they choose, splintering society.

Or, they might embrace the “totalitarian option,” which relies on government to force humans to behave, he said.

Rue, 46, a professor of religion and philosophy at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, presented his thesis at a recent symposium of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington.

A churchgoing but skeptical Lutheran, Rue suggests that we start all over, and create a new myth – a “noble lie” that squares with what is known scientifically, something that is convincing though it may not be factual.

What would that lie be? He doesn’t specify. “It remains for the artists, the poets, the novelists, the musicians, the filmmakers, the tricksters and the masters of illusion to winch us toward our salvation by seducing us into an embrace with a noble lie,” he told the scientific meeting.

Perhaps, he said in an interview, it is possible to rework, transpose and rephrase the Judeo-Christian tradition to make it plausible again.

In any case, the illusion must be “so imaginative and so compelling that it can’t be resisted,” so “beautiful and satisfying” that all would feel they have to accept it, he told the meeting.

“What I mean by the noble lie is one that deceives us, tricks us, compels us beyond self-interest, beyond ego, beyond family, nation, race . . . that will deceive us into the view that our moral discourse must serve the interests not only of ourselves and each other, but those of the earth as well.”

He said this lie would present a “universe that is infused with value. And such a universe is ultimately, I think, a great fiction. The universe just is. But a noble lie attributes objective value to it.”

He said “the great irony of our moment in history” is that what “we have most deeply feared” – being deceived – “is the ultimate source of our salvation from psychological and social chaos.”

He said “a good lie, a noble lie, is one that can’t be shown to be a lie by exposing it to a known truth or to science.”

“We need a kind of myth, a story, a vision of universality, that will get us pulling together, not just as Americans, but that will make us one, and give us solidarity of purpose,” he said.

“It must be a lie that inspires us to give up selfish interests in the service of noble ideals. . . . ” he said. “Without some kind of shared orientation, we can’t cooperate and can’t have a coherent society.”

“Without such lies we cannot live,” he said.

 

Interviews

  1. Loyal Rue pt 1: “Amythia” (interviewed by Barlow and Dowd)
    Loyal Rue, professor emeritus of Luther College in Decorah Iowa, wrote his first book, Amythia, in 1989. In 2014, Connie Barlow and Michael Dowd conversed with Loyal about his book and the malady of modernism, amythia.
    Date Published :- 2014-August-22nd
    Link

 

Indepth

Loyal Rue pt 1: “Amythia” (interviewed by Barlow and Dowd)

  1. Many religious people are seeing their Children leave the Church and what Amythia offers is one of the ways to accommodate what is attractive to these young people and what is unattractive in staying in traditional Churches; while also emphasizing that staying in Church and de-emphasis the problematic areas
  2. My thinking is changed about the Church
    • There has to be a new story, yet
      • It has to have continuity with the past
      • It has to be plausible
      • Intelligible, it could not be embarrassing to an Intelligent Being
  3. Tried to give an art to the new Story
    • The distinctiveness was the covenant
    • And, the plausibility is the Scientific World View
  4. But, the problem
    • Is that you have a myth that is embedded in a Cosmetology that is unbelievable
  5. And, the bigger problem became
    • How does one leave behind a cosmology that is becoming increasingly unbelievable
    • But, bring along the myth that was constructed upon the old cosmetology
  6. Customology together with humanity
  7. Michael Down – The Road Ahead
    • Take “BIG HISTORY” and trying to see how to “wrest” that destiny unto a naturalistic World View
      • Rather than wait to be saved by Cosmo Element
      • Taking hold of Saving the Planet
    • Covenant
      • Covenant becomes our covenant with Reality
    • Serving/Saving
      • Saving the Future
      • Serving becomes saving the Planet
    • If the Church will have any future
      • It will be the second coming of Christ
      • It will not be waiting on Christ
    • It will have to take responsibility
    • The Story of the Gospel is so hugely invested in Western Culture to just trash the whole thing
    • And, found that they just have to re-interpreted in a Science and in an Inspiring Way
  8. Loyal Rue
    • And, that is not too difficult to do
    • If you think about what the covenant is
    • If you think about the Hebraic Covenant
      • Most people will say that is the 616 laws
    • But, if you abstract it and say that it simply dictates if you follow these rules, you will live
    • And, so when will being that into the 21st Century we will see that it translates to our responsibility to
      • Global Warming – Take care of the environment
      • Address lack of Water
    • If Humanity accepts that and the Church accepts then we should be able to go the Churches and present it to them
    • Part of writing the book is an hope that the art will help us do that
    • Encourage Churchgoers to go back into their Church and evangelize this new message

 

Book

  1. Amythia – Crisis in the Natural History of Western Culture

Daniel Davis – Bruce Jenner’s Transformation Is A Lose-Lose For Liberal Ideology

 

Background

Admittedly I have listened in on Juanita Bynum’s take on Eddie Long’s untimely transition a few times.

And, I summarized her comforting words here.

A short, less than 10 minutes, segment that talks of the Work of the Holy Spirit is here.

She mentioned a name Daniel Lamont, I think it was.

As I am not familiar with that name, googled it, but did not find correlative matches.

 

Daniel Davis

But, found an interesting article by my Tocayo, Daniel Davis.

I think listening into his thinking will help yours.

 

Link

Bruce Jenner’s Vanity Fair coming-out party reaffirms traditional gender norms, even as he attempts to flee from them.

DanielDavis

By Daniel Davis

JUNE 3, 2015

Judging from the new cover of Vanity Fair, it appears that Bruce Jenner’s highly publicized transformation to purported womanhood has finally reached its climax. The title reads, “Call me Caitlyn.” The actual meaning? “Call me woman.”

As we’ve seen in recent months, the transgender movement sees itself as the next civil-rights frontier. It clearly hopes to copy the LGBT movement in winning public approval by securing more and more media exposure. But as the movement makes its public appeal, some internal contradictions in liberal sexual ideology are quickly emerging. One major contradiction looms large for the transgender movement, and it deserves attention.

For years, a major aim of the sexual revolution has been to deconstruct gender differences as being “social constructs,” mere cultural projections of what maleness and femaleness are and mean. This critique evacuated gender of any physical meaning and reduced it to an existential feeling—a feeling of being male or female, regardless of one’s sexual biology.

The effect of this critique has been to relativize gender, and thus to abolish it as a meaningful category. Because you can no longer tie “femaleness” to a normative set of traits or acts (for example, wearing dresses or marrying men), the category itself cannot help but lose its meaning. To call any particular act a “male” or “female” act would be to revert back to antiquated, repressive, patriarchal norms—norms that only serve to foster social inequality.

This is the ideology that governs liberal sexual philosophy, and it collides head-on with major aspects of the transgender movement. Transgenderism is unavoidably based on a kind of gender essentialism. It recognizes gender identities as being associated with certain socially accepted norms. What does it mean, for example, that Jenner’s “gender” is female? It means that he gets a sex change. It means that he poses in traditionally female attire for the cover of Vanity Fair. It means that he reaffirms traditional gender norms, even as he attempts to flee from them.

So Now Femininity Has Meaning?

In fact, he cannot help but reaffirm them, for they are the only tangible way of expressing gender. Inner feelings must inevitably take on flesh, and gender—understood as a mere feeling—must inevitably express itself in material form.

This is a problem for the broader liberal sexual movement. It wants to celebrate transgenderism, but it cannot do so without referring to—and thus, at least tacitly affirming—gender norms. To celebrate Jenner’s femininity is actually to commit a liberal heresy: to revert back to a form of gender essentialism.

There’s a flip side to this coin. As we noted, liberal sexual philosophy strips the term “gender” of all normative meaning. It reduces gender to a cultural phenomenon. In doing this, it robs transgenderism of its key claims to gender authenticity, and therefore of its right to moral affirmation. Consider it this way: If gender has no real connection to biology and certain social traits, then someone’s claim to a gender identity is virtually meaningless. And if it is meaningless, how can we be morally obliged to recognize it—let alone even understand it?

Marc Lamont Hill of the Huffington Post caught on to at least part of this problem on Twitter recently. After making clear that he supports for Jenner’s new gender identity, he wrote:

 

Between the Vanity Fair spread and “she’s so pretty” convos, we’ve smuggled in the same old cis/Eurocentric narratives about womanhood.

MarcLamontHill-20150601-0450PM

If we only celebrate and welcome Caitlyn Jenner bc she conforms to tradition cis/and European standards of beauty, we are making a mistake.

MarcLamontHill-20150601-0451PM

Hill understands that affirming someone’s gender identity involves affirming some cultural instantiation of that gender identity. As a post-colonial liberal, he wants to tear down those standards because, in his view, they perpetuate social injustice and gender inequality. Hill wants to affirm people’s gender identity in the abstract, but refrain from affirming the particular instantiation of that identity.

Unfortunately for Hill, the transgender community is seeking an embodied affirmation, one that sees gender identities as rightly fitting with a certain biology, a certain set of clothes—a lived femininity. Caitlyn Jenner doesn’t want to be affirmed in the abstract. He wants America to affirm his gender identity in terms of a lived femininity, and that means affirming his sex change and clothes as feminine. Those cultural norms are exactly the kind of “repressive” gender norms that Hill and other progressives want to abolish.

Hence, the liberal contradiction. If you truly celebrate Jenner’s transition, you have to do it by recognizing some cultural narrative about womanhood, thereby perpetuating gender “inequality.” But if you’re committed to the abolition of gender norms, there’s no way you can affirm Jenner’s femininity, except in the meaningless abstract. It’s a lose-lose.

What Is Gender, Anyway?

The root problem that led to this contradiction was the divorcing of gender from sexual biology and social traits. Having critiqued gender norms as being social constructs (and oppressive ones at that), gender has now become a free-floating abstraction that is wholly disconnected from material norms.

For gender to actually mean anything, it must instantiated in particular ways of being—a particular biology, particular clothes, and a particular way of relating to the opposite sex.

Even if these ways of being were all socially constructed, they would be essential to any meaningful understanding of gender. When gender is unhinged from biological sex and from generic social traits, it is an empty term, devoid of content and meaning.

The transformation of Bruce Jenner into Caitlyn Jenner only proves this reality. For Bruce to actualize his “true gender”—his femininity—he had to get a sex change and dress up as a woman. His “gender” had obvious implications for how he would live.

There’s no getting around this connection between gender and sex, between gender and social traits. It testifies to the eternal fact that human beings are fundamentally soul and body. However much we might try to be gender Gnostics and suppress this objective connection between the body and the soul, we cannot achieve the separation. Just as the soul depends on the body, gender depends on biology. If we wish to speak of gender, we must speak of the body—and that’s not going to change.

Daniel Davis is editor at Ecclesiam.org, a Christian journal dedicated to contemporary cultural issues.

Quotes

  1. Oswald Chambers
    • The Privilege of Conviction
      Conviction of sin is one of the rarest things that ever strikes a man. It is the threshold of an understanding of God. Jesus Christ said that when the Holy Spirit came He would convict of sin, and when the Holy Spirit rouses the conscience and brings him into the presence of God, it is not his relationship with men that bothers him, but his relationship with God.
      Link
  2. Leonard Ravenhill
    • Holiness
      • The greatest miracle that God can do today is to take an unholy man out of an unholy world, and make that man holy and put him back into that unholy world and keep him holy in it.
        Link
    • Church
      • The early church was married to poverty, prisons and persecutions. Today, the church is married to prosperity, personality, and popularity.
      • The Church used to be a lifeboat rescuing the perishing. Now she is a cruise ship recruiting the promising.
    • How we live
      • One of these days some simple soul will pick up the Book of God, read it, and believe it. Then the rest of us will be embarrassed. 
      • Why is there this criminal indifference to the lostness of men? Our condemnation is that we know how to live better than we are living
  3. Mary Peckham
    • Lewis 1949 Revival Testimony by Mary Peckham
      • Conviction of sin in a season of revival is too terrible for words
      • The Spirit of God witnessed with my Spirit and I knew I was saved

 

ecclesiam.org

Other good write-ups from ecclesiam.org

  1. Josh Holler
    Josh Holler is a graduate of Wheaton College with a B.A. in International Relations and a current student at Covenant Theological Seminary

    • Children as Vessels of Sanctification
      Link
  2. Matthew Arildsen
    Matthew Arildsen is pursuing an MDiv at Princeton Theological Seminary and is the associate editor for Ecclesiam

    • Voting Advice for Christians
      Link

Twins :- Adopted Or Just Different

 

Videos & Write Ups

  1. Mia and Alexandra
    • Independent Lens | Twin Sisters | Sibling Love | PBS
      Published on :- 2015-Sept-18th
      Link
    • The Amazing Story of Twin Sisters
      Link
    • The Movie
      Link
  2. Lucy and Maria Aylmer
    • Good Morning Britain
      • Non-Identical Twins | Good Morning Britain
        Link
  3. Anais Bordier & Samantha Futerman
    • ABC News
      • Twin Sisters Separated at Birth Reunite
        Link
  4. Audrey Doering & Gracie Rainsberry
    • On Good Morning America
      • Twin Sisters Separated at Birth Reunite on ‘GMA’
        Link
      • Identical Twins Reunited on ‘GMA’ Explore NYC Together
        Link
    • ABC News
      1. Identical Twin Sisters Separated at Birth Reunite
        Link

 

 

 

Indepth

Mia & Alexandra

The Story

Link

In this heartwarming documentary, identical twins Mia and Alexandra were found as babies in a cardbox in China in 2003. They were separated and put up for adoption to two families from opposite corners of the world: One of them from a small village in Norway, surrounded by high mountains and deep fjords, and the other from the major American city of Sacramento, California.

The twins are reunited by destiny when, incredibly, their adoptive mothers brought identical red gingham dresses for them to wear on adoption day. This startling coincidence made the mothers take note of each other and start talking. That’s when they noticed that the girls looked very much alike… but the orphanage denied that the girls were related.

Six months later, established a world apart, truth has its day when DNA tests confirm that the girls are identical twins.

A true story of inspiration, Twin Sisters follows Mia and Alexandra through an uplifting parallel journey until they reunite in Norway when they are 8 years old. This is one of those feel-good stories that will make you cry, laugh, and think about the people you miss in your life. Among the top documentaries in the world, this award-winning film has been seen by an estimated 20 million people so far, and broadcast by 30 TV channels around the world.

California – Eviction Process – Landlord & Rental Workflow

Background

As I came home on Tuesday evening, ran into a lady.  She was reading a self help book and I asked what it was about.

And, she replied something along the lines of finding happiness.

I dug a bit deeper as to whether it really works and she enthused yes.

During the long commute I was touched by her resiliency.

 

Areas Touched On

Areas she shared included:

  1. The book she was reading was one she gave her mother about 9 to 10 years ago.  Her mother was threading those final days of inoperable cancer
  2. Watching a childhood friend fight through Alcohol Abuse; A working alcoholic who finally hit rock bottom and checked himself into rehab.  And, how now he is doing far better.
  3. Counting the days till the conclusion of a “60-Days Notice to Vacate” she gave a tenant

 

Spiritual Journey

I personally do not like to approach hard places without some spiritual covering and so here we go.

 

Community of Faith

At my place of worship we participate with other faith communities and host Winter Relief.

In partnership with Social Organizations in our area, we host overnight stay for homeless people for about a month.

This is an essential service during the raining winter months.

 

Pray & Fast

Unless you really have to, do not do anything without praying and fasting.

 

Counseling

Live a life open and worthy of counseling.

People intuitively know when you are lying and hiding things from them.

And, they will only try to help you through coaching a few times.

 

Bible Verses

  1. Without counsel purposes are disappointed, but in the multitude of counsellors they are established ( Proverbs 15:22 )
  2. For through wise counsel you will wage your war, and victory lies in an abundance of advisors ( Proverbs 24:6 )
  3. And the king of Israel answered, “Tell him, ‘Let not him who straps on his armor, boast himself as he who takes it off.'” ( 1 Kings 20:11 )

 

Eviction Process

Each of the areas she touched on are worthy of several postings.

But, for the sake of brevity let us lean into the Eviction Process.

 

Judicial Branch Web Site

In modern societies, the court system is there to protect it citizens and residents.

And, so please educate yourself.

As her property is in California she will visit the web site for California Courts.

The URL for that website is here.

The are a couple of sections and those are:

  1. Self-Help>Eviction & Housing>Eviction >Eviction: Landlords
    Link
  2. Self-Help>Eviction & Housing>Eviction >Eviction: Tenants
    Link
  3. Self-Help>Eviction & Housing>Eviction >Eviction: Notices
    Link

 

Eviction: Landlords

Here is the workflow for Landlords…

eviction-landlord

 

Eviction: Notices

The first step the LandLord has to take is give the rental notice.

Notice Length

In summary, the length of the notice depends on how long the rental has been living at the residence and whether it is a government subsidized rental.

As a summarized breakdown:

  1. Non-Subsidized
    • If the rental agreement has been in place for a year or less, one can give a 30 day notice
    • On the other hand if the agreement has gone beyond the first year, one will need to give a 60 day notice
  2. Subsidized
    • If it is a Government Subsidized rental,  one will need to give a 90 day notice
Sample Notices

If one googles on “Notices for Rentals in California” one will find quite a bit of matches.

Some of them are plagued with advertisements and so I have listed the links for some of the ones that are direct and efficient here.

  1. University of California, Santa Cruz – Community Rentals
    Link
  2. 60-Day Notice to vacate
    Link

 

Forms

If the rental does not leave and it has gone beyond your grace terms, you will have to approach the Court and actually file an “Unlawful Detainer” Form.

To start the unlawful detainer case, you have to fill out 3 court forms:

  1. Summons – Unlawful Detainer-Eviction (Form SUM-130)
    Link
  2. Complaint – Unlawful Detainer (Form UD-100 )
    Link
  3. Civil Case Cover Sheet (Form CM-010)
    Link

 

Eviction: Tenants

Here is the workflow for Tenants…

eviction-tenant

 

Dissociative Identity Disorder

Cases

  1. Herschel Walker – Dissociative Identity Disorder
    • Discussion with Herschel Walker, Cindy DeAngelis Grossman ( his ex-wife ), and Jerry Mungadze ( his therapist )
    • Uploaded On :- 2010-Apr-28th
    • DID – Dissociative Identity Disorder 1 of 2
      Link
    • DID – Dissociative Identity Disorder 2 of 2
      Link
  2. Kanaan Ministries – Foundational Understanding of Mind Control – Dissociative Identity Disorder
    • Dissociative Identity Disorder
      Link

 

Indepth

Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker is widely regarded as one of football’s greatest running backs. He led the University of Georgia to victory in the Sugar Bowl on the way to an NCAA Championship and he capped a sensational college career by earning the 1982 Heisman Trophy. Herschel spent twelve years in the NFL, where he rushed for more than eight thousand yards and scored sixty-one rushing touchdowns.

But despite the acclaim he won as a football legend, track star, Olympic competitor, and later a successful businessman, Herschel realized that his life, at times, was simply out of control. He often felt angry, self-destructive, and unable to connect meaningfully with friends and family. Drawing on his deep faith, Herschel turned to professionals for help and was ultimately diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder, formerly known as multiple personality disorder.

While some might have taken this diagnosis as a setback, Herschel approached his mental health with the same indomitable spirit he brought to the playing field. It also gave him, for the first time, insight into his life’s unexplained passages, stretches of time that seemed forever lost. Herschel came to understand that during those times, his “alters,” or alternate personalities, were in control.

Born into a poor, but loving family in the South, Herschel was an overweight child with a stutter who suffered terrible bullying at school. He now understands that he created “alters” who could withstand abuse. But beyond simply enduring, other “alters” came forward to help Herschel overcome numerous obstacles and, by the time he graduated high school, become an athlete recognized on a national level.

In Breaking Free, Herschel tells his story — from the joys and hardships of childhood to his explosive impact on college football to his remarkable professional career. And he gives voice and hope to those suffering from DID. Herschel shows how this disorder played an integral role in his accomplishments and how he has learned to live with it today. His compelling account testifies to the strength of the human spirit and its ability to overcome any challenge.

Kanaan Ministries ( South Africa – SA )

Narrator

Amanda Buys, Kanaan Ministries, South Africa, is the instructor.

 

Discussions

  1. Captive Spirit
    • The following is an extract from the latest course ACTS (Advanced Counsellors Training School). For the complete course – there are 23 DVDs and 3 manuals, which can be purchased from our office, please contact our office:
    • Parts
      • Captive Spirit – Part 1
        Published On : 2016-May-27th
        Link
      • Captive Spirit – Part 2
        Link
      • Captive Spirit – Part 3
        Link
  2. Foundational Understanding of Mind Control
    • Foundational Understanding of Mind Control – Part 1
      Published on :- 2016-May-30th
      Link
  3. SRA / Dissociative Identity Disorder ( DID ) Advanced Training Sessions
    • SRA / DID Advanced Training Sessions 1 – 3
      Added On: 2017-Jan-16
      Link
  4. Neshamah – Journey to Freedom
    • Amanda Buys, Kanaan Ministries, South Africa, is the instructor in this video seminar on the Neshamah and is supplemental to the teaching “Understanding Neshamah in Counseling DID/SRA”. It was recorded in January of 2013.
      Published On :- 2013-Sep-27
      Link

InDepth

Captive Spirit

Captive Spirit Part 1

  1. The enemy comes against the Counselor and places fear in his heart and mind
    • Every new level comes with his own level of intimation
    • Balance between Faith and Fear
  2. Isaiah 42:22
    • But this is a people robbed and spoiled; they are all of them snared in holes, and they are hid in prison houses: they are for a prey, and none delivereth; for a spoil, and none saith, Restore.
  3. Wound Type
    • It is a Spirit wound [ Segment 11 ]
      • It is not just a soul wound
      • Once it gets into captivity, it is both a Soul and Spirit wound
  4. The Captive in the Tower
    • The enemy takes advantage of these moments of great suffering and trauma to capture a fragment/piece of us and takes us prisoners in his kingdom
    • When a person suffers from intense trauma, regions of fear capture his spirit and soul
  5. In her youth, she suffered through an alcoholic father
    • She built a stronghold
    • Others those it was just stubbornness

Captive Spirit Part 2

  1. Lord, I repent that I did not run to you
    • Proverbs 18:10
      • He also who is slack in his work Is brother to him who destroys.
        The name of the LORD is a strong tower; The righteous runs into it and is safe.
        A rich man’s wealth is his strong city, And like a high wall in his own imagination.…The name of the Lord is a strong tower

Captive Spirit Part 3

  1. Lies of the Evil one
    • Isaiah 28:16-18
      • A Cornerstone in Zion
        …Therefore thus says the Lord GOD, “Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone, a tested stone, A costly cornerstone for the foundation, firmly placed.
        He who believes in it will not be disturbed.
        I will make justice the measuring line And righteousness the level; Then hail will sweep away the refuge of lies And the waters will overflow the secret place.
        Your covenant with death will be canceled, And your pact with Sheol will not stand;”
  2. Repeated Transgressions
    • Prisons of Sin
      • Sexual Immorality

 

SRA / Dissociative Identity Disorder ( DID ) Advanced Training Sessions

  1. Now people can say that I have prayed, but how do they live
  2. The physical traits of the fruit can be there and exists, but how is being expressed
    • They can be pray
    • But how does that person live?
  3. Really have to live and pray
  4. The way we live is a testament to God’s ability to change lives
  5. It is not just about sitting in Church every Sunday and making sure that I keep that sit…
    • That is a joke
    • That is playing a Church
  6. Am I changing the community around me
  7. Am I there for my neighbor
  8. It does not matter what my skin color is
  9. It does not matter what my Political Party is
  10. Checked
    •  I will not speak with you much longer, for the prince of this world is coming, and he has no claim on Me. ( John 14:30 )
  11. Anointing
    • If you want Authority before the Lord, it is based “On how are you Living
    • It does not mean my gifts
      • I can be very gifted, but not have any anointing

 

Screen Shots

Fruit of the Spirit

Definition ( Segment Part 1 – 25th Minute )

definitionoffruitofspirit

Anointing Is

anointing