Neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them

Bible Verse

Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you.
( Matthew 7:6 )

 

Wikipedia

Link

  1. The metaphor seems to be teaching against giving what is holy to those who do not appreciate it. Animals such as dogs and pigs cannot appreciate religion, and this verse implies that there is some class of humans who cannot either. The identity of this class is a difficult question, as one of the dominant ideas in Christian thought is universalism.
  2. One modern argument is that dogs and pigs represent Gentiles and heathens, and that this verse is rare relic demonstrating that Jesus’ original message was intended only for the Jews. Harrington notes that such warnings are found in rabbinic works of the period.  In Jewish literature heathens were often compared to dogs, and the unclean pig was a Jewish symbol for the Roman Empire. In 2 Peter 2:22 dogs and swine quite clearly refers to heretics. According to Schweizer this verse was used by Jewish Christians to attack the Gentile churches, to argue that Gentile Christians would turn on the Jews by rejecting their laws and destroying Israel
  3. The dominant reading is that the two expressions are both referring to the same thing and the same group of people. To Nolland this verse is not an attack on any particular group, but rather a continuation of the theme of God and Mammon begun at Matthew 6:24 and that verse is an attack on wasteful spending. We should put all of our resources to God, as everything is like dogs and pigs compared to Him.  Nolland also proposes that the verse might be to balance the other verses, that non-judgmentalism can only go so far and that there are some who should be excluded.
  4. As Morris points out, this verse can also be read as a reasonable limit on evangelism. If a population or individual is not open to Christianity, leave and find a more receptive audience. As Morris points out Jesus was silent before Herod and Peter abandoned the unsympathetic city of Corinth. Fowler links this to the earlier discussion of judgment. One should not judge severely, but there is a point at which any reasonable person will realize that those they are dealing with are dogs and swine
  5. The alternate interpretation is that dogs and pigs are not metaphors for some group of people, but for the unholy in general. This verse is not about excluding some group from God’s teaching, but rather ensuring that those things that are God’s are kept holy. Thus the Temple is kept clean, religious meals treated with respect, and holy days honoured and kept separate from the turbulence and impiety of daily life.
  6. In Divine Conspiracy, Dallas Willard offers another interpretation. In it, Jesus is not speaking of a wonderful treasure (the pearl), or whether the audience is fit to have it (the swine). Instead, he is observing that the pearl is not helpful. “Pigs cannot digest pearls, cannot nourish themselves upon them.” He concludes that this reflects “our efforts to correct and control others by pouring out our good things” that our audience is not ready for, and that our seemingly good intentions will ultimately yield anger, resentment and attack by the audience. This turns the analogy into one that exposes one’s self-superiority in thinking the other needs the unbidden advice.
  7. All those points aside, one might usefully read through Matthew 13 when interpreting the phrase. The “pearls” may be like the seed sown by the farmer. If the farmer continues to sow on the rocky places, path or among thorns he may be foolish. The farmer may be wiser to sow in the good soil; or suffer weaker harvests (albeit the crops that do grow among weeds and/or thorns or in other, harder, places may prove more hardy: having survived and then been considered “good enough to keep” by the farmer despite the effects of the weeds and/or thorns). Like the seeds, pearls (of wisdom) placed before swine might simply be swallowed without being digested: repeated without understanding (perhaps as Jesus saw others of his time repeating scripture without understanding it). Matthew 13:44-46 opens this interpretation up a little further. As a more contemporary note, it is worth considering the sowing parables in light of subsequent monastic thought on selective breeding (see Augustinian Friar, Gregor Mendel and peas): the seeds from the crops that survived the weeds, thorns, path or rock may provide stronger, more durable, seed for sowing in all types of situation – albeit there may be differences in taste and quality to consider too.

Videos

  1. Calvary Chapel Ontario
    • Pastor Paul LeBoutillier
      • Videos
        • YouTube

 

 

 

Damon Thompson – Kinsman Redeemer

 

Videos

  1. YouTube
    1. Small Segment
      Link
    2. Full Segment
      Church :- Redemption Point Church Highland Park Campus,Chattanooga Tennessee
      Publisher :- Ricky Ricardo Smith
      Date Preached :- 2016-August-28th
      Date Published :- 2016-August-29th
      Link

Outline

  1. Redeem the Land
    • Passages
      • If one of your fellow Israelite’s becomes poor and sells some of their property, their nearest relative is to come and redeem what they have sold. ( Leviticus 25:25-28 )
      • Jeremiah said, “The word of the Lord came to me: .. your uncle is going to come to you and say, ‘Buy my field, because as nearest relative it is your right and duty to buy it.’” ( Jeremiah 32:6-9 )
  2. Redeem the Enslaved
    • Passages
      • “If a foreigner residing among you becomes rich and any of your fellow Israelites become poor and sell themselves to the foreigner or to a member of the foreigner’s clan, they retain the right of redemption after they have sold themselves.” ( Leviticus 25:47-55 )
  3. Provide Heir
    • Then Judah said to Onan, “Sleep with your brother’s wife and fulfill your duty to her as a brother-in-law to raise up offspring for your brother. ( Genesis 38:8-10 )
    • If brothers are living together and one of them dies without a son, his widow must not marry outside the family. Her husband’s brother shall take her and marry her and fulfill the duty of a brother-in-law to her. ( Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
    • Moses told us that if a man dies without having children, his brother must marry the widow and raise up offspring for him. ( Matthew 22:23-28 )
  4. Justice
    • The avenger of blood shall put the murderer to death when they meet. ( Numbers 35:16-21 )
  5. Trustee for the Redeemed Land
    • Any man or woman who wrongs another in any way and so is unfaithful to the Lord is guilty and must confess the sin they have committed. They must make full restitution for the wrong they have done. ( Numbers 35:16-21 )
    • I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven ( Matthew 16:13-20 )

 

Passages

Redeem the Land

Leviticus 25:25-28

 

Jeremiah 32:6-9

Redeem From Slavery

Leviticus 25:47-55

 

Provide a Heir

Genesis 38:8-10

 

Deuteronomy 25:5-10

 

Matthew 22:23-28

 

Justice

Numbers 35:16-21

 

Provide Trustee for the Redeemed

Numbers 5:5-8

 

Matthew 16:13-20

 

Campbell Robertson :- “A Quiet Exodus: Why Blacks Are Leaving White Evangelical Churches”

Background

Writing for the New York Times, Campbell Robertson has an interesting take on a little split among evangelicals.

 

A Quiet Exodus: Why Blacks Are Leaving White Evangelical Churches

Link

Then came the 2016 election.

Black congregants — as recounted by people in Chicago, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Fort Worth and elsewhere — had already grown uneasy in recent years as they watched their white pastors fail to address police shootings of African-Americans. They heard prayers for Paris, for Brussels, for law enforcement; they heard that one should keep one’s eyes on the kingdom, that the church was colorblind, and that talk of racial injustice was divisive, not a matter of the gospel. There was still some hope that this stemmed from an obliviousness rather than some deeper disconnect.

Then white evangelicals voted for Mr. Trump by a larger margin than they had voted for any presidential candidate. They cheered the outcome, reassuring uneasy fellow worshipers with talk of abortion and religious liberty, about how politics is the art of compromise rather than the ideal. Christians of color, even those who shared these policy preferences, looked at Mr. Trump’s comments about Mexican immigrants, his open hostility to N.F.L. players protesting police brutality and his earlier “birther” crusade against President Obama, claiming falsely he was not a United States citizen. In this political deal, many concluded, they were the compromised.

It said, to me, that something is profoundly wrong at the heart of the white church,” said Chanequa Walker-Barnes, a professor of practical theology at the McAfee School of Theology at Mercer University in Atlanta.

Early last year, Professor Walker-Barnes left the white-majority church where she had been on staff. Like an untold number of black Christians around the country, many of whom had left behind black-majority churches, she is not sure where she belongs anymore.

We were willing to give up our preferred worship style for the chance to really try to live this vision of beloved community with a diverse group of people,” she said. “That didn’t work.”

It has been a scattered exodus — a few here, a few there — and mostly quiet, more in fatigue and heartbreak than outrage. Plenty of multiracial churches continue to thrive, and at some churches, tough conversations on race have begun. The issue has long shadowed the evangelical movement. The Rev. Billy Graham, who died last month at 99, bravely integrated the audience at his crusades and preached alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but kept silent at key moments.

But for many black churchgoers, the current breach feels particularly painful. Lecrae, a prominent black Christian hip-hop artist, has spoken openly of his “divorce” with white evangelicalism, Christian counselors have talked frankly of the psychological toll of trying to hang on in multiracial churches and others have declared it time to consider the serious downsides of worship integration.

Everything we tried is not working,” said Michael Emerson, the author of “Divided by Faith,” a seminal work on race relations within the evangelical church. “The election itself was the single most harmful event to the whole movement of reconciliation in at least the past 30 years,” he said. “It’s about to completely break apart.”

‘This Is What I Need’

Ms. Pruitt had been a churchgoing Christian since the mid-1990s, first joining a mostly black megachurch in Dallas, where she was on the dance team. Inspiration began to flag after some years there, and one night she was drawn to a pastor whom she saw on television. He was, she later learned, Robert Morris of Gateway Church.

Gateway started nearly twenty years ago with a prayer group in Pastor Morris’s living room, and has in the past two decades grown to become a $140 million ministry, drawing upward of 31,000 people a week to six campuses in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

The scale and thoroughness of the operation are extraordinary: the attractive ledgestone-and-wood arena — with a coffee kiosk serving a Gateway blend — at the church’s Southlake, Tex., headquarters; the worship music booming over a first-class sound system; the robust programs for children, single parents and a host of other groups.

Above all, for many members, there are Pastor Morris’s weekly messages themselves: wry, often self-deprecating, sprinkled with biblical scholarship and often affectingly personal.

“This is what I need right now,” thought Ms. Pruitt, moved to tears when she first went to orientation programs at the church. Members who happened to sit near her at worship came to ask about her when she missed a service, and some came to her grandmother’s wake. One couple began to refer to her as a daughter.

The congregation is mostly white, but not entirely; the pastors at two of the six satellite campuses are black men. Church videos and promotional materials are intentionally filled with people of color. The goal, says Pastor Morris, who is white and has a black son-in-law, is to have a church that looks like heaven as described in the book of Revelation: “from every nation, tribe, people and language.”

The general whiteness of the congregation is not something that every black worshiper dwells on anyway. To grow up black, said Carla McKissic Smith, who started going to Gateway in 2009, is to get used to being in the minority.

As the headlines of the outside world turned to police shootings and protest, little changed inside majority-white churches. Black congregants said that beyond the occasional vague prayer for healing a divided country, or a donation drive for law enforcement, they heard nothing.

Tamice Namae Spencer, who used to attend a mostly white church in Kansas City, said her fellow congregants did not seem to even know the name Trayvon Martin, the black teenager killed in Florida at the hands of George Zimmerman in 2012. And when Ms. Spencer brought up his death, she said white church members asked why she was being divisive.

“It’s not even on your radar and I can’t sleep over it,” she remembered thinking. “And now that I’m being vocal, you think I’ve changed.”

At Gateway, black worshipers would discreetly ask one another if they were the only ones who noticed that one could talk about seemingly anything but racism, a feeling one former congregant described as an out-of-body experience.

Jeremiah White, who is black, was so excited about Gateway when a friend brought him there years earlier that he insisted his parents come. Now a teenager, with his parents volunteering at the church for 12-hour days on weekends, Jeremiah had also begun to notice “the little details”: an associate pastor, trying to get the attention of a black man, jokingly referring to him as the one God left in the oven a little long; a youth leader suggesting Jeremiah must be new because he was black.

In the summer of 2016, Jeremiah made a cartoon and sent it to church leaders, depicting an elephant sitting on a man, squeezing out his insides. The elephant was labeled “Racism”; the man’s insides were labeled “Gateway Church.”

Politics From the Pulpit

Pastor Morris had become aware of the disquiet himself, mainly from listening to black pastors at other churches. Still, while they would meet and talk and pray, not a lot would happen.

We didn’t talk about it much before because we didn’t know,” he said of whites generally, in a recent interview at one of Gateway’s satellite campuses. “We just thought, ‘O.K. there was a tremendous racial problem in America. The civil rights movement came, laws have been passed now and we’re over that now. We passed it.’ What has happened in the last few years is many white pastors are beginning to realize we never dealt with this scripturally. We never truly repented.”

In July 2016, days after a black man enraged about police brutality shot and killed five Dallas police officers, Jeremiah’s father had breakfast with one of the church’s senior pastors. He spoke to him frankly about race and his frustration with the church’s silence.

After that breakfast, church staff began discussing how to face matters directly. In meetings over the coming weeks, black staff members would talk of their own past struggles with racism and the grim parts of American history that still went unacknowledged. A pastor at Ms. Pruitt’s church campus pledged from the pulpit to tear down racism, one conversation at a time.

Then, the next month, Pastor Morris preached a message entitled “Still.” It began with a series of qualifications. God is still in control. There is no perfect political candidate. Voting is choosing the lesser of evils. Yes, there is gender inequality. And yes, there is a race problem in the country, though racism, implying hate, is not the right word. Pastor Morris said it was a subtler problem of prejudice.

Then he focused attention on the upcoming presidential race.

“The election,” he said, “is extremely important.”

The country is in trouble financially; a critical Supreme Court appointment awaits; one of the major parties advocates using “taxpayer dollars, your dollars,” for abortion. Evangelical Christians sit at home on Election Days, while “those who are trying to change our constitution” go to the polls, and look at what happens: Prayer is taken out of the schools.

“We are going the wrong way,” he concluded. “We need to get involved, we need to pray and we need to vote.”

He never said to vote for Mr. Trump. But the implication in the sermon, and in the leaflets that handed out at church, was lost on no one: that one must vote to uphold Christian values and that the Republican Party platform reflected those values. And Mr. Trump was the Republican candidate.

Ms. Pruitt sent messages to several white couples she had befriended at the church, telling them she was going to take some time off. She had become uneasy at a church, she told them, that speaks of overcoming racism on one Sunday “and then turns around later and asks me to support” Trump, who she believed was “a racist candidate.”

One of the couples invited her to come to their house. Sitting in the living room over a plate of brownies, Ms. Pruitt explained to the wife how disturbed she had been by the clear inference from the pulpit that she should support a candidate whose behavior and rhetoric were so offensive that she could not bring herself even to say his name.

The woman explained that a Trump victory had been prophesied and handed Ms. Pruitt a two-page printout, which began: “The Spirit of God says, ‘I have chosen this man, Donald Trump, for such a time as this.’” Barack Obama, the woman continued, should never have been president, since he was not born a United State citizen. The visit ended with the woman suggesting that Ms. Pruitt’s discomfort at the church was God telling her it was time to move on.

Ms. Pruitt never went back.

Jeremiah’s family also left for good that summer, though he has heard that pictures of them still show up in church videos. They have not found a church since.

One young black woman who had been going to Gateway for some years said she has begun exploring Ethiopian Christian traditions. Another woman, a former church staff member who still goes to Gateway, cut back her attendance from five days a week to once a month, if that, and is now praying for guidance on whether to leave altogether.

Carla McKissic Smith stayed until one Sunday in March 2017, when a guest speaker, a messianic rabbi from New Jersey, spoke of the 2016 election from the pulpit, saying that it “threatened to seal the acceleration of America’s apostasy,” but that Mr. Trump’s victory was the fulfillment of God’s covenant with Israel. “It was not the Russian intervention that determined it,” he said to a congregation that frequently broke into applause and cheers. “The intervention was a bit higher.”

Three months later, Ms. Smith’s father, the Rev. Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Dallas, would introduce a resolution condemning the alt-right at the annual Southern Baptist Convention in Phoenix. Unlike the resolutions condemning gambling and Planned Parenthood, his alt-right resolution didn’t make it out of committee.

Pastor McKissic was told that racism had already been adequately addressed by the Southern Baptists, that the resolution was inflammatory and that sympathy for the alt-right was not an issue in the church. Word leaked, embarrassing the convention, and a new version of the resolution was reintroduced and overwhelmingly passed, albeit with some language changed and with an added tally of the Southern Baptists’ past efforts against racism.

“At that point,” Ms. Smith said, “I was no longer surprised.”

Mr. Trump’s win, which one elder at Gateway described as a “supernatural answer to prayer,” generated a frisson of excitement at the church. Pastor Morris told the congregation that he was one of Mr. Trump’s faith advisers. The church was a sponsor of an inaugural ball in January 2017.

Jelani Lewis, one of the two black campus pastors, knew this was creating unease among many black members of Gateway. A black deacon approached him at one point and asked how he should reconcile his trust in Pastor Morris with “some of the things that I’m seeing from the current president.” We trust in God, Pastor Lewis assured him, and we can trust in the heart of our pastor.

‘A Lack of Understanding’

As a tumultuous 2017 unfolded, Pastor Morris understood that some wanted him to address race directly.

“As I prayed about it as I talked with black pastor friends of mine, I realized I don’t really understand the depth of the pain they feel,” he said. “This is personal to them — it was history to me. I would talk to my friend and it was personal to him because it was his great-grandfather.”

In October 2017, he preached a message entitled “A Lack of Understanding.” Addressing “all the ignorant white people,” and acknowledging his own past grappling with prejudice, the pastor listed reasons that racism was evil — among them that it was an affront to God’s creation, given that Adam and Eve were probably brown-skinned. A video played of a black pastor talking of the racism he experienced as a child in East St. Louis in the 1960s. Pastor Morris concluded by urging people of color in the congregation to spread out and pray with whites in small groups.

The response, Pastor Morris said, was “overwhelmingly positive,” and indeed the reaction on Facebook suggests as much. Pastor Lewis remembers a black woman weeping in her seat, and was thankful that he finally had an answer for black worshipers questioning how their church truly felt about racism.

On Facebook some white congregants were angered at the sermon, especially at the focus on white people as the root of the problem.

“I believe Robert spoke from his flesh in this message,” one of them, Steve Groebe, later recalled in a Facebook message. “I gave him another week to correct the message and make it biblical. I didn’t feel he did that so I left the church.”

The message was not better received among the black worshipers who had already left the church. It did not, several said, address the enduring structural legacy of racism, instead adhering to the usual evangelical focus on individual prejudice. Most significantly, they said, it gave no sense that Pastor Morris had ever wrestled with his support of Donald Trump.

“I wasn’t wrestling,” Pastor Morris said of his feelings in 2016, going on to explain that he was not wrestling now, either. “We were electing what we felt was the person who held the values that the church loves dearly the most. That doesn’t mean that he’s perfect. But I do believe after spending time with him that he really wants to learn, that he really wants to do a good job for all Americans. I really do.”

There are larger racial injustices in the country, he said, and those injustices need to be fixed — though not in ways that would enable dependence, he clarified, but rather to “give people a hand up, not a handout.” He noted the low black unemployment rate under Mr. Trump. The answer to racism lies primarily in the church, not the government, he said, and now that white pastors are waking up to the pain that black people have felt, it is in many ways a hopeful time.

“I think that there’s an anger and a hurt right now, and a fear,” he said, “and I think that people are going to get past that.”

There is now a team at the church focused exclusively on making the church more diverse. On the weekend before Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a 49-second video of excerpts from King’s “I Have a Dream” speech was played at worship services — “a monumental moment in Gateway church history,” one pastor said, the first time that the day had been acknowledged.

 

The Inheritance

When Ms. Pruitt arrived at Mount Olive, the service had already begun, with a 26-person choir singing a gospel hymn, accompanied by a drummer and a man on a Hammond organ. This was one of the first churches she had attended for worship in a year and a half. She had kept giving tithe money to Gateway for some months after she stopped going, but after learning about the inaugural ball, started donating to another church. On most Sundays she had stayed at home, watching services online.

The sanctuary at Mount Olive was brightly lit, and the one video screen advertised an essay contest for Black History Month. The congregation was older and more formally dressed than those of many megachurches. But for two young white men, all the worshipers were African-American.

The Rev. William Timothy Glynn, wearing a sharply knotted necktie and a silk pocket square, began his message, on Elisha’s taking up the mantle of the prophet Elijah. It was less a sermon, he acknowledged, and more a collection of observations; among them was that we inherit things from the past for a reason, and thus should not quickly discard them.

“We live in this day where they want to throw what grandma had out the window; that’s old and that’s fogy and we don’t have church like that no more, and we don’t like that no more, amen?” Pastor Glynn half sang. “Have you ever thought about what their religion got them through? It got them through slavery, Jim Crow, segregation, from the back of the bus to the front of the bus. It brought them through everything anybody could throw and that’s all they had. It built churches and schools and hospitals. Millions? They didn’t have thousands! They had nickels and dimes!”

Service ended in just under two hours. Ms. Pruitt needed to go pick up her mother, who was finishing her shift as a police dispatcher. On the way she drove out of Fort Worth, past a little community founded by a group of emancipated slaves, near the headquarters of an international ministry run by a Gateway elder. Then, with her mother, she went back to the house they share in a quiet neighborhood named after a Confederate major.

The next week Ms. Pruitt considered the other 11 churches on the list, and on Sunday, she tried someplace new.

 

Videos

  1. Robert Morris
    • Robert Morris – Still
      • Videos
        • YouTube
          • YouTube – Still
            Link

Bible Study – “Women, however, will be saved through childbearing” ?

Background

1 Timothy 2:15

Women, however, will be saved through childbearing, if they continue in faith, love, and holiness, with self-control.

 

Question

What does it mean to be saved through childbearing?

Video

  1. Are Women Saved By Childbearing?
    Publisher :- Israeli News Live
    Published On :- 2014-Dec-22nd
    Link
  2. Desiring God
    • 1 Timothy 2:15 // How Are Women Saved Through Childbearing?
      Publisher :- Desiring God
      Published On :- 2017-May-20th
      Link

 

In-depth

Israeli News Live

Are Women Saved By Childbearing?

  1. Book of Thomas
    • The Gnostic Society Library – The Nag Hammadi Library – The Gospel of Thomas
      Link
      (18) The disciples said to Jesus, “Tell us how our end will be.”
      Jesus said, “Have you discovered, then, the beginning, that you look for the end? For where the beginning is, there will the end be. Blessed is he who will take his place in the beginning; he will know the end and will not experience death.”
  2. Genesis 1:4
    • When Jesus walked the Sea of Galilee he was showing that he was God manifested
      • Genesis 1:2-4
        And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
      • And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
      • And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.
  3. Oneness
    • I am not a oneness at all

Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit

Introduction

There is a phrase that comes across in various forms, such as:

  1. Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit
  2. Unforgivable Sin

Let us see how different theologians identify and tackle it.

Bible Verses

Matthew
Unpardonable Sin ( Matthew 12:31-32 ) ( Link )

“Therefore I say to you, every sin and blasphemy [every evil, abusive, injurious speaking, or indignity against sacred things] will be forgiven people, but blasphemy against the [Holy] Spirit will not be forgiven.

Whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven; but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit [by attributing the miracles done by Me to Satan] will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to come.”

 

Mark
Mark 3:28-30  ( Link )

“I assure you and most solemnly say to you, all sins will be forgiven the sons of men, and all the abusive and blasphemous things they say; but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit and His power [by attributing the miracles done by Me to Satan] never has forgiveness, but is guilty of an everlasting sin [a sin which is unforgivable in this present age as well as in the age to come]”— [Jesus said this] because the scribes and Pharisees were [attributing His miracles to Satan by] saying, “He has an unclean spirit.”

 

Luke
Confessing Christ  – Luke 12:9-10 ( Link )

…But whoever denies Me before men will be denied before the angels of God.

And everyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven.

Vidoes

  1. Jewels of Judaism
    • Ki Teitzei
      • What is the sin that leads to death? – Ki Teitzei
        There are some verses in the Bible that are difficult to understand. 1 John 5:16 is one of those verses. What is the sin that leads to death? Watch this video now to learn a reasonable answer to this question from this week’s Torah Portion.
        Link
  2. Michael Heiser
    • What is Blasphemy against the Holy Spirit
      Channel :- Sentinel Apologetics
      Date Published :- 2017-June-9th
      Link
  3. Rob J Hyndman
    • The Watchman
      • What is blasphemy against the Holy Spirit?
        Link
  4. Father Anthony Messeh
    • A sermon given by Father Anthony Messeh at St. Marks Coptic Orthodox Church of Washington D.C on June 27, 2010.
      Channel  :- Orthodox Sermons
      Published  :- 2011-March-10th
      Link
  5. Jacob Prasch: Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit
    • Jacob Prasch: Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit
      Channel :- Moriel Ministries
      Published On :- 2015-April-17th
      Link
  6. Spirit Church, David Diga Hernandez
    • What is the Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit?
      Channel :- Encounter TV
      Published On :- 2016-Jan-17th
      Link
  7. Doug Batchelor
    • Doug Batchelor – What is the Unpardonable Sin ?
      Link
    • The Unpardonable Sin: Part 2- (Doug Batchelor) AmazingFacts ©
      Link
  8. Tim Conway
    • I will be Honest
      • The Unpardonable Sin – Blasphemy Against the Holy Spirit
        Link
  9. Matt Slick
    • What is blasphemy of the Holy Spirit? Can a Christian commit it?
      Link
  10. Don Carson
    • Don Carson on the Unforgivable Sin
      Published On :- 2016-August-3rd
      Link

 

Indepth

The Watchman ( Answered by Rob J Hyndman )

  1. Law of Moses
    • Leviticus 24:16
      • Anyone who blasphemes sin
        • Anyone who blasphemes the name of the LORD is to be put to death. The entire assembly must stone them. Whether foreigner or native-born, when they blaspheme the Name they are to be put to death.
        • Verse Link
  2. Verses
    • Matthew 12:31-32
      • 31 “Therefore I say to you, every sin and blasphemy [every evil, abusive, injurious speaking, or indignity against sacred things] will be forgiven people, but [a]blasphemy against the [Holy] Spirit will not be forgiven.
        32 Whoever speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven; but whoever speaks against the Holy Spirit [by attributing the miracles done by Me to Satan] will not be forgiven, either in this age or in the age to 
    • Mark 3:28
      • Indeed, no one can enter a strong man’s house to steal his possessions unless he first ties up the strong man. Then he can plunder his house.
        Truly I tell you, the sons of men will be forgiven all sins and blasphemies, as many as they utter.
        But whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will never be forgiven; he is guilty of eternal sin.”…
    • Luke 12:-11
      • But whoever denies Me before men will be denied before the angels of God.
        And everyone who speaks a word against the Son of Man will be forgiven, but whoever blasphemes against the Holy Spirit will not be forgiven.
        When you are brought before the synagogues, rulers, and authorities, do not worry about how to defend yourselves or what to say.…
  3. Consciously and deliberately showing contempt for the Power of God
    • Miracles by Holy Spirit
    • Claimed to be pagan deity
    • Considered and deliberate
    • Knew it was not true
    • Done for Political Reason

 

Jewels of Judaism

What is the sin that leads to death? – Ki Teitzei

  1. 1st John 5:6
    • If any man see his brother sin a sin which is not to death, he shall ask, and he shall give him life for them that sin not to death. There is a sin to death: I do not say that he shall pray for it.
      • Bible Hub Commentary
        Link
  2. Deuteronomy 21:
    • Bible Verse Link
      • Bible Gateway
        Link
    • Broken down
      • 18
        • “If any man has a stubborn and rebellious son who will not obey the voice of his father or of his mother, and when they reprimand and discipline him, he will not listen to them,
      • 19
        • then his father and mother shall take hold of him, and bring him out to the elders of his city at the gateway of his hometown.
      • 20
        • They shall say to the elders of his city, ‘This son of ours is stubborn and rebellious; he will not obey us, he is a glutton and a drunkard.’
      • 21
        • Then all the men of his city shall stone him to death; so you shall remove the evil from among you, and all Israel will hear of it and be afraid.
  3. How did it come to this
    • Not willing to turn from sin, which ultimately leads to death
    • Though Disciplined
    • Continuing Unrepentant Spirit
    • God wants us to wrestle with it and know the inner content

 

Spirit Church, David Diga Hernandez

  1. 2 Corinthians 5:11-12
    • Link
      • ESV
        • BibleGateway.com
          Link
    • Verses
      1. Therefore, knowing the fear of the Lord, we persuade others. But what we are is known to God, and I hope it is known also to your conscience.
      2. We are not commending ourselves to you again but giving you cause to boast about us, so that you may be able to answer those who boast about outward appearance and not about what is in the heart.
  2. Greater judgement on those who teach the word
  3. Religious people are trying to trap Christ in an enigma
  4. Casting out demons by Spirit of God
  5. Angry that he is drawing people to God
  6. Fault
    • Rejecting Power of Holy Spirit
    • Identity of Christ
  7. Attribution of the Holy Spirit Work to Demonic Spirit
    • Intentional

 

Ravi Zacharias – Sermons & Discussions – 2018/Feb

 

Videos

  1. Ravi Zacharias on Roman Catholicism
    • Is Roman Catholicism a cult? – Ravi Zacharias at Texas A&M’s Veritas Forum
      Dr. Ravi Zacharias answers the question, “Is Roman Catholicism another example of how unity does not equal uniformity within the Christian community or is it at its core a derivative of true Christianity?” at Texas A&M’s Veritas Forum on
    • Videos
      • Video #1
        March 19, 2014.
        Channel :- Fiat Lux
        Published on :- 2014-March-20th
        Link
  2. Ravi Zacharias talks about Joel Osteen
    • Profile :- Ravi Zacharias talks about Joel Osteen and it’s not good. God Bless You Ravi keep up the good work.
    • Videos
      • Ravi Zacharias talks about Joel Osteen
        Channel :- Johnny OnTheSpot
        Published On :- 2018-Jan-4th
        Removed On :- 2018-March-10th
        Link
      • Ravi Zacharias Drops TRUTH Bomb on Joel Osteen & his followers
        Channel :- The Vigilant Christian
        Published On :- 2018-Feb-6th
        Added On :- 2018-March-10th
        Link
    • More
      • The full video is From “The 2007 Ligonier National Conference with Ravi Zacharias, Albert Mohler, R.C. Sproul, and R.C. Sproul Jr.
        • Mohler, Sproul, Sproul Jr., and Zacharias: Questions and Answers #1
          Link
  3. Ravi Zacharias and Dennis Prager with Jeff Foxworthy The Death of Truth, The Decline of Culture Q&A
    • Videos
      • Ravi Zacharias and Dennis Prager with Jeff Foxworthy The Death of Truth, The Decline of Culture Q&A
        Channel :- Bryan Caron
        Date Published :- 2017-Oct-17th
        Link
  4. Ravi Zacharias 2017 – Living A Life Used By God – DECEMBER 2017
    • Videos
      • Living A Life Used By God
        Channel :- Christian Sermons
        Date Published :- 2017-Dec-18
        Link

 

Church of Truth – Roman Trachuk – 2018/Feb

 

Videos

  1. Spiritual Maturity
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • Roman Trachuk – Make Maturity Your Goal (Church of Truth)
          • Roman Trachuk – Make Maturity Your Goal (Church of Truth) [ Segment – Maturity]
            Link
          • Roman Trachuk – Make Maturity Your Goal (Church of Truth) [ Full ]
            Channel :- Church of Truth
            Streamed Live on :- 2017-May-22nd
            Link
  2. To Know Him – Roman Trachuk
    • Videos
      • To Know Him – Roman Trachuk
        • Video – Full
          Link
  3. What God Limits
    • Videos
      • Roman Trachuk – What Limits God? (Church of Truth)
        • Video – Full
          Link

 

Indepth

Spiritual Maturity

Roman Trachuk – Make Maturity Your Goal (Church of Truth)

  1. Humility
    • Humility is the role of the student
    • We have to be humble to be taught by God
  2. Truth
    • What is the value of the truth if it does not change us.
  3. Timing
    • So many movements that are already really to take place
    • We will attain them through maturity
    • Timing connected
      • Through humility
      • Through timing
  4. Maturity
    • Able to function in the fullness
    • By obedience to God
  5. Weakness of others
    • How we respond to weakness of others
  6. Types of Christians
    • None Christian
    • Baby
    • Carnal Man
    • Matured
  7. Matured Christian
    • Walk in the Spirit
    • Children of the Light
    • Manifest gift of the Spirit
  8. Example
    • Corinthians
      • Positive
        • Did not fall short in Spiritual gifts
      • Lacking
        • But, fell short in maturity
        • Strive, envy, and division