Syria

Intro

Syria has been in the news a lot lately.

Wanted to see what youtube has on it.

 

Video

  1. The Reason Why America Is Bombing Syria – Coast To Coast AM Alternative APR 2017
    There has been a secret war between Syria & America since before Ronald Reagan took up office in the white house. Watch this video so you can better understand what is going on in Syria.
    Published On :- 2017-April-17th
    Added On :- 2017-April-17th
    Link

 

Indepth

The Reason Why America Is Bombing Syria – Coast To Coast AM Alternative APR 2017

  1. Constructive Ambiguity
    • Wikipedia
      • Link
      • Constructive ambiguity is a term generally credited to Henry Kissinger, said to be the foremost exponent of the negotiating tactic it designates.  It refers to the deliberate use of ambiguous language on a sensitive issue in order to advance some political purpose. Constructive ambiguity is often disparaged as fudging. It might be employed in a negotiation, both to disguise an inability to resolve a contentious issue on which the parties remain far apart and to do so in a manner that enables each to claim obtaining some concession on it.
  2. Assad Response
    • Said to Kissinger “Release demons hidden under the surface of the Arab World
    • British Journalist
      • Assad Optimism has gone
      • His trust in the future has gone
      • What emerges instead is brutal and vengeful Assad who sought nothing but revenge
  3. Ronald Reagan
    • Sunny Optimism
    • But, inherited damage wrought by Henry Kissinger & Assad’s botched diplomacy
  4. Palestine Massacre
    • Christian Lebanese Faction
    • Israel stood by
  5. Ronald Reagan
    • Sent in troops
    • Promised they are neutral
  6. Assad did not believe
    • He believed they were sent to fraction the Arabs
    • He leaned on Khomeini
  7. Khomeini
    • Ruled over Iran for 2 years
    • Developed poor man’s bomb
    • Bomb
      • Suicide specifically prohibited in the Koran
    • In the past you become a martyr because God chose the place and time of your death
    • Khomeini changed the thinking
    • He went back to fundamental Shi’ite thinking
      • Destroy yourself to further the revolution
      • Hussein ( Founder of Shi’ite Muslim )
      • Rituals
      • March in procession
  8. Iran
    • Iran & Iraq War
      • School kids loaded into Buses
      • Walked right into enemy territory to open up gaps
  9. Assad took from Khomeini
    • Take explosives with you
    • Become known as suicide bombing
    • Two Suicide bombers
    • 241 America Marines were killed
  10. Hezbollah was thought to be responsible
    • Many of them were Iranians, but under the command of Assad
    • Links
      • Hezbollah Is Winning the War in Syria
        Link
  11. Dec 1985, Rome and Vienna Airport
    • 19 people killed
    • 5 Americans
  12. Reality became less and less important in American Politics
    • It wasn’t what was real that was driving the facts
    • It was how you can twist the facts
    • How you can twist the facts to make your opponent look bad
    • It became how can you manipulate the American people
  13. Lockerbie Bombing, 1998 Scotland
    • For 18 Months Syria was blamed
    • Security changed story to Libya
    • Local Investigators thought it was Syria
    • Libya
      • Libya evidence circumstantial, but strong
      • One can be charged based on circumstantial evidence alone
    • Assad needed for coming Gulf War
  14. 10 years later
    • Assad was no longer in control
      • Fundamentalism jumped from to Shi’ite to Sunni
  15. Hamas kidnapped an Israeli Border Guard
    • Israel Response
      • 450 Hamas were kidnapped and taken to Israel
      • Hamas & Hezbollah were placed in same holding space
      • Hezbollah taught Hamas how to do Suicide attack
  16. Hamas
    • Hamas started making inroads into Israel itself
    • Suicide Bombing became part of Hamas resistance
    • Tactic shocked the Sunni World
    • Most senior religious leaders in Saudi Arabia said it was wrong
    • Granted OK by Cleric in Egypt
      • Issued Fatwa
      • Said it was OK to kill civilians
      • Said that as all Israelis are required to serve in the Military, there is no difference between soldiers and regular citizens
      • Israeli women are not women as in our religion, because women can serve in the military
      • Further he said Allah has given the weak an ability to protect themselves by turning themselves into bombs
  17. 20 Years Later after President Ronald Reagan
    • 20 years after Pres. Reagan experienced first suicide attack
    • Suicide Bombing – Report Card – 01
      • Destroyed fragile peace and placed political solution a bit more out of reach
      • Destroyed first thing, Political Settlement,  Assad said he wanted
      • Gaddafi
        • American had retracted and allowed suicide bombing to fester and mutate
        • America went after Gaddafi
          • Evil Tyrant of head of a rogue state
          • Arch criminal who wanted to terrorize the world
      • Them and their evil personality
  18. After 9-11
    • If only you could remove the leadership, the grateful people of their country will transform into Democracy
    • George Bush Jnr, Tony Blair
      • Saddam Hussein & Iraq
      • Possessed by Saddam Hussein
      • Line between truth and fiction become more blurred
      • Sept 2002, head of MI6 went to Blair
        • We have found the source that confirm that everything
        • Saddam Hussein’s chemical weapons
        • Scene from movie
          • The Rock
          • Sean Connery and Nicolas Cage
  19. Iraq War
    • Bashar Assad replicated his father
      • Profile
        • Hobbie :- Computer, Syria Computer Society
        • Favorite Movie :- Electric Light Orchestra
      • Set up a pipeline to allow militants to go from Syria to get to Iraq
        • Militants
          • Sunnis started killing Shiite
          • Wanted Civil War, Sectarian Conflict,  in Iraq
          • Beheading of Daniel Pearl
            • Daniel Pearl, Son of Judea Pearl
              • Judea Pearl is an Israeli-American computer scientist and philosopher, best known for championing the probabilistic approach to artificial intelligence and the development of Bayesian networks
              • Journalist for Wall Street Journal
  20. Upon returning from Iraq
    • The Sunni warriors turned against Bashar Assad
    • Assad responded in fury
    • His response turned the country into an Inferno
  21. Western Leaders
    • Bashar Assad is evil
    • But, his detractors might be more evil
    • Then it got more complicated, the Russians came in
      • Non-Linear Warfare
        • Approach called Non-Linear Warfare
        • Developed by Vladislav Surkov
        • Tested in Ukraine
        • A world of multi-contradictions that makes it difficult for opposition to response as they can not counteract a shifting narrative
        • The ultimate aim is not win the war, but to manage and control it

 

Jonathan Haidt

Background

It always humbles me to see how far ahead so many of these guys really are.

Profile

 

Quotes

“If you want the truth to stand clear before you, never be for or against. The struggle between ‘for’ and ‘against’ is the mind’s worst disease.”
Sent-ts’an, Buddhist, around c. 700 C.E.

 

 

Videos

  1. Tim Keller & Jonathan Haidt at NYU – The Closing of the Modern Mind – Identity Politics
    Link
  2. Jonathan Haidt: The moral roots of liberals and conservatives
    March 2008
    Link

David Brooks – This Age of Wonkery

Background

Newspaper Man, David Brooks, writes an article only he can write; as it takes not being solidly behind an Ideology.

 

Story

 

Link

If you were a certain sort of ideas-oriented young person coming of age in the 20th century, it was very likely you would give yourself a label and join some movement. You’d call yourself a Marxist, a neoconservative, a Freudian, an existentialist or a New Deal liberal.

There would be certain sacred writers who would explain the world to you — from Jung to Camus, Dewey or Chesterton. There’d probably be a small magazine where the doctrines of your sect would be hammered out.

People today seem less likely to give themselves intellectual labels or join self-conscious philosophical movements. Young people today seem more likely to have their worldviews shaped by trips they have taken, or causes they have been involved in, or the racial or ethnic or gender identity group they identify with.

That’s changed the nature of the American intellectual scene, the way people approach the world and the lives they live.

In his book, “The Ideas Industry,” Daniel W. Drezner says we’ve shifted from a landscape dominated by public intellectuals to a world dominated by thought leaders. A public intellectual is someone like Isaiah Berlin, who is trained to comment on a wide array of public concerns from a specific moral stance. A thought leader champions one big idea to improve the world — think Al Gore’s work on global warming.

As Drezner puts it, intellectuals are critical, skeptical and tend to be pessimistic. Thought leaders are evangelists for their idea and tend to be optimistic. The world of Davos-like conferences, TED talks and PopTech rewards thought leaders, not intellectuals, Drezner argues.

Intellectual life has fallen out of favor for several reasons, he continues. In a low-trust era, people no longer have as much faith in grand intellectuals to serve as cultural arbiters. In a polarized era, ideologically minded funders like George Soros or the Koch brothers will only pay for certain styles of thought work. In an unequal era, rich people like to go to Big Idea conferences, and when they do they want to hear ideas that are going to have some immediate impact — Jeffrey Sachs’s latest plan to end world poverty or Amy Cuddy’s findings on how to adopt the right power stance.

Drezner doesn’t call this a decline, just a shift (let’s not underestimate how silly and wrong some of the grand, sweeping intellectuals could be). But I’m struck by how people’s relationship to ideas has changed.

In the first place, public thinkers now conceive of themselves as legislative advisers. Drezner writes a book called “The Ideas Industry,” but he is really writing about public policy. When George Orwell, Simone de Beauvoir or even Ralph Waldo Emerson were writing, they were hoping to radically change society, but nobody would confuse them with policy wonks.

Second, there was a greater sense then than now, I think, that the very nature of society was up for grabs. Call it a vestige from Marxism or maybe Christianity, but there was a sense that the current fallen order was fragile and that a more just mode of living was out there to be imagined.

Finally, intellectual life was just seen as more central to progress. Intellectuals establish the criteria by which things are measured and goals are set. Intellectuals create the frameworks within which politicians operate. How can you have a plan unless you are given a theory? Intellectuals create the age.

Doing that sort of work meant leading the sort of exceptional life that allowed you to emerge from the cave — to see truth squarely and to be fully committed to the cause. Creating a just society was the same thing as transforming yourself into a moral person.

For George Orwell, this meant being with the poor and the oppressed — living as a homeless tramp in England, a dishwasher in Paris, getting shot through the neck as a soldier in the Spanish Civil War. It meant teaching himself how to turn political writing into an art form.

For the Italian Communist Antonio Gramsci, it meant committing fully to ideas, even if it meant years in prison, and doing the rigorous mental work required for a life of hard thinking. He was as left as can be, but he believed in traditional school curriculums, the tough grinding of learning Latin and Greek grammar. “It will be necessary to resist the tendency to render easy that which cannot become easy without being distorted,” he wrote.

It also meant joining a tradition and a team. There were a whole set of moral tests involved with obedience to the movement, breaking ranks when necessary, facing unpleasant truths, pioneering a collective way of living, whether feminist, Marxist or libertarian.

The 20th century held up intellectuals like that, and then discredited them — too many were too wrong about communism and fascism. But we’ve probably over-adjusted, and deprived a generation of a vision of the heroic intellectual. It’s good to have people who think about North Korean disarmament. But politics is most real at a more essential level.

Continue reading

Tiffany Buckner On Anointed Fire

Background

Via YouTube came across a new voice to me.

Her name is Tiffany Buckner and her YouTube channel is “Anointed Fire“.

 

Commentary

In a very personal voice she touches on the wounds we bear.

And, how those wounds can be identified in ourselves, those close to us, and others we meet at work and at play.

She contemplates on ways they can come to be and how we can start to hide them as we make room for God’s covering.

 

Verses

  1. But the path of the righteous is like the light of dawn, That shines brighter and brighter until the full day. The way of the wicked is like darkness; They do not know over what they stumble ( Proverbs 4:19 )
    • Those in darkness do not know what makes them stumble
  2. Give these instructions to the believers, so that they will be above reproach. If anyone does not provide for his own, and especially his own household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever. A widow should be enrolled if she is at least sixty years old, the wife of one man ( 1 Timothy 5:8)
    • A man who does not responsibility for his own wife

 

Videos

  1. What happens when you ‘re not properly hidden ( Message to Single Women )
    This message is the unfiltered truth… beware! You will learn what happens when you don’t hide yourself in the Lord and you decide to date or marry the man YOU chose for yourself, instead of waiting for the one God has designed you for.
    Published On : – 2017-March-14th
    Added On : – 2017-April-4th
    Links :-

  2. Woman of God, You Are a Responsibility (A Message for Single, Engaged and Married Women)
    Links :-

    • Short Clip on submission & Responsibility, Blessings, and Favors
      Link
    • Full
      Link
  3. Unmasking the Jezebel Spirit
    Published On : – 2017-March-14th
    Added On : – 2017-April-4th
    Link :- Link

 

Indepth

What happens when you ‘re not properly hidden ( Message to Single Women )

  1. Standing with a guy for jewelry
    • He does not have it within him to cover you
    • He does not have it within him to under you
    • He does not have it within you to pay full price for you
  2. I put it within a man to work
    • A man can not appreciate what he did not pay for
  3. A man that cannot afford you needs to pass you back

 

Woman of God, You Are a Responsibility (A Message for Single, Engaged and Married Women)

  1. If you end up with a man who does not want to take responsibility
    • Satan can come in and he can bind the strong man of the house
    • And, he will actually stand behind the woman and have try to be the one who tries to step in and protect the household
  2. God’s Gift – Free Will { Segment 12 to 13 }
    • Free will of God
    • That is the very thing God gave
    • If a woman chooses not to submit
      • Then she is outside of the will of God and might pick up the Jezebel Spirit
    • If she chooses not to submit
      • Then he knows she can reason with him
      • And, he seizes on the fact that she does not need to be told, controlled, etc
      • Spirit filled woman
  3. God deals with the controlling Man
    • He is abusing his authority
    • Man will be without peace
  4. Get with a controlling man l { Segment 14 to 16 }
    • Deal with her full responsibility without enjoying the blessing of who she is
  5. Locked Up
    • The favor and blessing that she is, is locked up inside of her and God will not allow it to come out
  6. Jezebel
    • If a man sits back and let the Jezebel Spirit come into his house, he then has willing received it
  7. Helpmate
    • Allow God to teach the man

Lamar Odom – “What Can Grow Even From There”

Introduction

Everyone has a ministry and there are obstacles that come along to take one off Living it!

I really like this story by Lee Jenkins as it captures the personhood of Lamar Odom.

 

Sports Illustrated ( SI ) – Lee Jenkins take on Lamar Odom – March 23, 2009

LEE JENKINS
Link

Wednesday October 14th, 2015

Editor’s note: This story was originally published in the March 23, 2009 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. Lamar Odom was reportedly found unconscious on Tuesday at a Nevada brothel. He’s currently being treated at a nearby hospital.

The happiest Laker is the one whose father was addicted to heroin, whose mother died of colon cancer when he was 12, who attended three high schools, had his first college scholarship revoked before the fall semester of his freshman year, became a subject of three college investigations, declared for the NBA draft, tried unsuccessfully to pull out of the draft, was picked by arguably the worst franchise in sports, violated the league’s antidrug policy twice within eight months and after finally getting his life together, went home to New York City for an aunt’s funeral and wound up burying his 6 1/2-month-old son, then getting robbed at gunpoint.

“That’s my book,” says Lamar Odom. “That’s my movie. It’s a big bowl of gumbo.”

As he ponders working titles for his life story—“This is L.A., so you never know,” he says—he is wearing a white sweat suit and driving a white Mercedes down Interstate 405 to an autograph signing in Orange County, one hand on the steering wheel and another deep inside a bag of potato chips. Every few minutes, he turns and glances at the backseat, where his 10-year-old daughter, Destiny, and 7-year-old son, Lamar Jr., are occupied with their own snacks.

“My grandmother was always upbeat, a naturally happy person,” he says, chomping on the chips. “I think I got that from her.” His grandmother was Mildred Mercer, who raised him when his parents were gone. She died on June 28, 2003, three years to the day before his baby boy.

Maybe Grandma Mildred is to thank for one of the most irrepressible personalities in the NBA, a 6’10” forward who, at 29, has been in the league for 10 seasons and famous for nearly half his life, and yet still wears his mitt when he goes to baseball games in the hope of catching a foul ball, collects pro wrestling figurines as a hobby and asks the staffer behind him on the team’s plane for permission to recline his seat because “my legs are kind of long.” More than an hour into the autograph signing in Huntington Beach, Destiny spotted a bulge in her dad’s left sneaker. “What’s that?” she asked. Odom reached into his size-16 hightop and pulled out the crumpled potato chip bag. “I didn’t know what else to do with it,” he said. Destiny smiled and shook her head.

If you were going to build a basketball player in a lab, it might look like Lamar Odom, a broad-shouldered Stretch Armstrong. He’s a point guard in a power forward’s body, long enough to anchor the post but coordinated enough to lead the break. The problem with trying to engineer another Odom is programming what he’s going to say. After his best game of this season, when he scored 28 points and grabbed 17 rebounds in Cleveland in February, capping a 6–0 road trip and dealing the Cavaliers their first home loss of the season, he said in a postgame interview, “I’m ready to go home and put my feet in the sand.” A month later, as he walked barefoot down Manhattan Beach, sweatpants hiked up to his knees, view clear to Catalina Island, he cooed, “This is the Laker lifestyle.” He is an unrestricted free agent after the season and cannot fathom a move inland.

While Kobe Bryant is the king of Staples Center, Odom is a gifted and versatile court jester. “I’ve heard fans yell to him in the middle of games, ‘Nice shot!’ and he’ll turn around and say, ‘Thanks, man,’” says John Ireland, sideline reporter for Lakers telecasts on KCAL 9. Before the Dec. 25 game against the Celtics at Staples, Odom was wishing fans in the courtside seats Merry Christmas when he stopped at Adam Sandler. “Happy Hanukkah,” he said. Topics in his interviews range from his favorite TV show (MacGyver) to his favorite tourist destination (“Paris,” he says. “I can smell the wine in the air”) to his alter ego (“There’s Lamar, who’s humble, and then there’s Odom”) to his unconventional wardrobe, including a Sergeant Pepper–style ensemble that prompted coach Phil Jackson to ask Odom if he had come to the arena straight from band practice. Says point guard Derek Fisher, “He’s our new Shaquille O’Neal.”

Odom carries himself with an ease and optimism reminiscent of O’Neal and before that Magic Johnson, but he is an original. The person he calls Dad is a 47-year-old white man of no relation. He signed with UNLV in part because he stopped in a Las Vegas nightclub on his recruiting visit and saw a rap group from New York City, which he interpreted as an omen. He would wind up at Rhode Island, where in his first meeting with coach Jim Harrick he asked for a backpack. “I don’t think he’d ever had a backpack before,” Harrick says. Odom declared for the draft after one season at Rhode Island, but he had such misgivings about the move that he hatched a plan to play for the Celtics while commuting to URI to continue his class work. “It would have been groundbreaking,” he says. After it became clear that the NBA is indeed a full-time job — Odom was taken fourth by the Clippers in 1999 — he hired a tennis agent who had never represented a basketball player before. Don’t question his intuition, though. That tennis agent, Jeff Schwartz, is now one of the premier agents in the NBA, with a client list that includes Paul Pierce, Jason Kidd and Josh Howard.

Before every game the Lakers lock arms and form a circle around Odom. He is an unusual centerpiece: not their captain, not their best player, not their second best player, and when center Andrew Bynum returns from his knee injury, maybe not even their third best player. (At week’s end Odom was averaging a career-low 10.6 points and 8.0 rebounds, though his adjusted plus-minus was fourth in the league.) But when the lights dim and the decibels rise and Odom starts bouncing up and down in the middle of the circle—“We’re the best team in the NBA!” he shouts—the Lakers bounce with him.

Lakers G.M. Mitch Kupchak says Odom is the most popular player in L.A.’s locker room, but he also might be the most popular player in the locker room next door. The Los Angeles D-Fenders are the Lakers’ developmental-league affiliate; they practice in the same gym and play on the same court as the NBA players but reap few of the other benefits. “Most guys at that level don’t have time for us,” says guard Brandon Heath. “But L.O. is always telling us to come over to his house, offering to take us out to dinner. We could damn near go over there in our drawers, and he’d probably take us to buy clothes.”

The Lakers are paying Odom $14.6 million this year, and he gives a fair amount back. “I saw him signing autographs after a game and told him to hurry up and get on the bus or he’d be fined,” says Robert Lara, the Lakers’ head of security “He told me he’d take the hit. He couldn’t say no to the kids.” Odom has a hard time saying no to parents as well. “I know one boy who doesn’t even play basketball, but Lamar pays his tuition,” says Joseph Arbitello, a former teammate of Odom’s at Christ the King in Queens, N.Y., and now the coach and athletic director there. “His mother was struggling, so she called Lamar and he took care of it.”

Sharing has long been part of his game. Growing up, Odom’s idol was Magic, not Michael. He preferred to dish rather than dunk. “When we had college scouts come watch us, he wouldn’t shoot,” says Arbitello. “He wanted to make everybody else look good.” Odom’s reluctance to score drove coaches crazy but made him beloved by teammates. “Lamar is not the kind of guy who will ever say, ‘F— this, give me the ball,’” says Gary Charles, who coached Odom’s AAU team, the Long Island Panthers. “He could not score a point and be happy as heck.” Of course, players change when they get to the NBA, where salary is often proportional to scoring average. “Lamar’s a pleaser,” says his personal trainer, Robbie Davis. “He wants to throw you an alley-oop and give you a pound on the way back down.”

Odom’s you-first mentality would not seem suited to showbiz, but Hollywood is drawn to him. He has appeared on HBO’s Entourage (Johnny Drama lusts after his calf muscles) and MTV’s Rob Dyrdek’s Fantasy Factory (Odom plays one-on-one against Dyrdek, who is wearing stilts for the showdown). He has his own clothing line (Rich Soil), his own record label (Rich Soil Entertainment) and is part-owner of a restaurant called East that’s due to open this spring in Hollywood. “He surrounds himself with cutting-edge-thinking people,” says Dyrdek, who’s also an investor in the restaurant. Odom has been romantically linked to Taraji P. Henson, the Oscar-nominated actress from The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. There is a long history of athletes dating actresses, but few have been of Henson’s caliber. She is 38 and the mother of a 14-year-old boy, a star rather than a starlet. “I think about her sometimes on the court, about what she’s done,” Odom said. “It makes me want to play better.”

When Odom learned before this season that he’d be coming off the bench for the first time since ninth grade—in a contract year no less—he wondered aloud if Jackson had “bumped his head.” But soon after, Odom said he would accept the diminished role, insisting it was Odom who had balked and not his better angel Lamar.

“I sometimes have to stop and remind myself how much this guy has been through and how much he’s lost,” Fisher says. “I’m sure there is anger and disappointment inside of him, but to have his spirit, to have his approach to everyday life, I don’t know how he does it.”

He may have inherited his good nature from Grandma Mildred, but he gets his perspective from personal experience. He sat at his mother’s bedside as she took her final breath. He held his son’s body for three hours after young Jayden succumbed to sudden infant death syndrome. Odom was kicked out of UNLV before he’d played a single game—a graduate assistant knocked on his door and informed him that he was being released from his scholarship because his ACT score had come into question. He was admitted to Rhode Island only as “a nonmatriculating student” and was not allowed to play so much as intramural basketball. He wept at a press conference with the Clippers after the league had suspended him a second time for smoking marijuana. “People used to call me Little Lloyd,” Odom says, referring to Lloyd Daniels, a fun-loving, ball handling big man from the New York City playgrounds who went to UNLV, was arrested for buying cocaine and later was shot three times in a drug dispute. Daniels survived and kept playing basketball, but his name is synonymous with talent wasted.

Odom’s name, on the other hand, is synonymous with talent salvaged. In the past five years he has overhauled his reputation, proving that he is not the slacker who left Christ the King because of poor grades (“stupid, stupid, stupid,” he says) or the mercenary who took $5,600 from a UNLV booster, landing the school on probation after he left, or the enigma who would take off from Rhode Island’s campus for days at a time, turning off his phone and checking into a hotel to find a little solitude. After signing a six-year, $65 million free-agent deal with the Heat in 2003, he started an AAU basketball program called Team Odom, so that the next generation of prodigies might receive better guidance than he did. He also renovated the family’s row house in Queens where he grew up and added a studio apartment where he can stay when he’s in town. He even apologized recently to his coach with the Clippers, Alvin Gentry, believing he was somehow responsible for Gentry’s firing in 2003.

“Lamar came to see me a few years ago, and he told me he was lucky he survived,” says Bob Oliva, Odom’s coach at Christ the King. “I told him his mother must have been looking down on him from heaven.”

To an outsider, it may seem that Odom hides his grief beneath a veil of humor, but in fact he confronts it first thing every morning. Besides the traditional memorials—tattoos of family members and names scrawled on sneakers — his bedroom in Manhattan Beach is filled with photographs of his mom, Cathy Mercer, and of Jayden. Odom does not like cemeteries, but he loves pictures. “I look at them right when I wake up,” he says. “That’s when I like to reflect on things.” When Mercer died, Odom ran to the basketball court at Lincoln Park in Queens and shot jumpers all night. But when Jayden died, Odom recognized that he would need more than blacktop to heal. He spent two years seeing William Parham, a psychologist from UCLA, and after sessions he would walk out and tell the Lakers’ trainers, “I feel like I just went to the bathroom.” He meant it in the most therapeutic way.

Odom has reconnected with his father, Joe, who is now drug-free, but he remains closer to another man he calls his dad. Jerry DeGregorio coached Odom in high school (at St. Thomas Aquinas Prep), college (as an assistant at URI) and the NBA (as a front-office staffer with the Clippers) but taught him more about family and faith. DeGregorio is the godfather to Destiny and Lamar Jr., and he sits with them in the first row behind the basket at Staples Center. (The kids live about 20 minutes from Lamar with their mother, Liza Morales, who was also Jayden’s mom.) Odom winks at them during timeouts and rolls his eyes at them if he misses a free throw. When Odom and DeGregorio are together, they hold hands and pray for wisdom, protection, guidance and peace. When they are apart, they pray over the phone. “Lamar has lived two lives, one full of blessings and one full of tragedies,” says DeGregorio. “Everything bad about amateur basketball happened to him—street agents, sneaker companies, college boosters. How many people go through that grinder and come out the other side?”

How Odom’s odyssey affects his game, and in turn the Lakers’ chance to win the championship this season, is something Phil Jackson is still figuring out. Every player has swings in his stat line, but Odom can score 23 points in a game, as he did on Feb. 26 against the Suns, and then score four, as he did in Phoenix three days later. “Most of it with Lamar is internal,” Jackson says. “It’s part of his psyche. He’s distracted at times. We try to work with him a lot on focus.” Asked if Odom’s lapses are connected to his personal saga, Jackson says, “Without a doubt.”

Odom and Bryant have never duplicated the Pippen-Jordan dynamic that Jackson hoped to re-create, but their rapport is one reason L.A. is at the top of the Western Conference. The two first played together at Adidas ABCD camps in high school; after Parade magazine named Bryant its player of the year in 1996, Odom won the same honor in ’97. When Odom was contemplating whether to skip college and go directly to the NBA, he flew to Los Angeles to seek Bryant’s counsel, staying at Bryant’s house. Says Kobe, “I told him there was no right or wrong decision.”

Odom’s career path would have been much simpler if he had followed Bryant straight to the pros, but he wasn’t wired that way. Bryant is preternaturally assertive, Odom deferential. What makes them different makes them jibe. Odom’s inconsistency invites outrage among talk-radio callers and message-board posters who clamor for him to be more aggressive, more like Bryant. But the last time the team had two players with the same self-interests, one of them had to be shipped to Miami. Odom was one of the key players acquired from the Heat in the 2004 trade of Shaq.

“A lot of people have wasted a lot of time thinking about who they want Lamar Odom to be rather than appreciating him for who he is,” says Jeff Van Gundy, the ESPN analyst who was coaching the Knicks when Odom was making headlines as a New York City high school star. “I always look back at where he started. In stories like his, you don’t see a lot of happy endings. So when you do see one, I think it should be celebrated.”

Odom’s clothing line includes scores of T-shirts depicting animals and religious images. But there is one emblazoned with a framed black-and-white photograph of a basketball court. It is the court at Lincoln Park where Odom played the night his mother died. Superimposed over the bottom right corner is a bright red rose. As Odom walks on the beach, about as far from that court as he can get in the continental U.S., he is asked if the rose is a symbol of his mom. “No,” he says. “It’s a symbol of what can grow, even from there.”

The rose is Lamar.

Videos

Lamar Odom

  1. Lamar Odom’s Message to Khloe & Biggest Regret
    NBA star Lamar Odom joins The Doctors for an exclusive interview, where he reveals his surprising message to his ex-wife Khloe Kardashian and his biggest regrets.
    Published On : 2017-Jan-17th
    Link
  2. Lamar Odom Sobriety Test
    Published On : 2017-Jan-17th
    Link
  3. Lamar Odom Breaks His Silence: ‘Everything Was My Fault’
    Lamar Odom cheated death 17 months ago. “I’m a walking miracle,” says the former NBA star and ex-husband of Khloé Kardashian, admitting he suffered 12 strokes and two heart attacks after being found comatose October 13, 2015, at a Las Vegas–area brothel. Cocaine use and reckless behavior had already ended his four-year marriage. Yet Kardashian delayed a divorce to support his recovery, ultimately refiling in May 2016 after the Queens native was photographed drinking at L.A.’s Beverly Center.
    Published On : 2017-March-29th
    Link

 

Caleb Swanigan

  1. Adoptive father helped formerly homeless boy to basketball stardom
    Caleb Swanigan of the Purdue Boilermakers is one of the best players in college basketball. But a few years ago, he looked nothing like the man he is today. Steve Hartman reports.
    Published On: 2017-March-3rd

    Link
  2. Purdue Men’s Basketball / Caleb Swanigan – Transformative
    Purdue’s Caleb Swanigan is a front-runner for National Player of the Year honors. Here is his transformative story.
    Published On: 2017-Feb-15th
    Link

 

Other Videos

  1. Joe Nichols
    • Joe Nichols – If Nobody Believed In You
      Published On: – 2019-Oct-5th
      Link
    • Joe Nichols – The Impossible
      Published On :- 2007-Oct-7th
      Link
    • Joe Nichols – She Only Smokes when she drinks
      Published On :- 2009-Oct-7th
      Link
  2. Kenny Chesney
    • Kenny Chesney – That is why I am here
      Published On : 2009-Nov-23rd
      Link
  3. Billy Currington
    • Billy Currington – Walk A Little Straighter
      Published On :- 2009-Oct-6th
      Link

 

Quotes

  1. Lamar Odom
    • Lee Jenkins, SI
      • Superimposed over the bottom right corner is a bright red rose. As Odom walks on the beach, about as far from that court as he can get in the continental U.S., he is asked if the rose is a symbol of his mom. “No,” he says. “It’s a symbol of what can grow, even from there.”
    • The Doctors
      • Sobriety
        • It is new, but it is good to be sober
      • When I went to treatment before I was a boy. When I left treatment this time, I came out a Man.
      • God
        • It was a Spiritual Journey for me, as well.  To find that higher power and get closer to him
      • Kids
        • When you are doing drugs, you become distance from everything.  Even your kids, you become numb
        • To restore what we have as a family is important to me
      • Addiction
        • I know now it is a Brain disease
      • If you have one regret what will it be, wasted time, because you can never get that back
    • Lamar Odom Breaks His Silence: ‘Everything Was My Fault’
      • If you live with the Devil, you might start to like him
      • If you are trying to be in a serious relationship
      • Children
        • If you smoke a lot, you probably can not have children
        • Your Spam don’t swim straight