Ray Dalio

 

Quotes

    1. Ray Dalio, who has built up the largest hedge fund in the world on the back of an intense internal culture advocating radical transparency, believes that “the greatest tragedy of mankind — or one of them — is that people needlessly hold wrong opinions in their minds.” ( Link )
    2. The Bridgewater Associates founder and chairman was answering questions on the unusual culture at his hedge fund known as an “idea meritocracy.” The endeavor has led Bridgewater to create a system in which employees rate one another’s credibility on a number of dimensions, and everyone can see the ratings. ( Link )
    3. The data from these assessments are crunched to create a “believability” rating. Votes by employees with higher believability ratings are given greater weight in decision-making ( Link )
    4. “If you want to know the key to whatever Bridgewater’s success has been, it’s not me, it’s not what’s in my head: It’s my ability to deal with what I don’t know,” ( Link )
    5. “But while almost all of us quickly agreed on the principles intellectually, many still struggled to convert what they had agreed to intellectually into effective action. This was because their habits and emotional barriers remained stronger than their reasoning.”
    6. “Make sure those who are given radical transparency recognize their responsibilities to handle it well and to weigh things intelligently. People cannot be given the privilege of receiving information and then use the information to harm the company, so rules and procedures must be in place to ensure that doesn’t happen.”
    7. “Don’t let the little things divide you when your agreement on the big things should bind you.”
    8. “A culture and its people are symbiotic—the culture attracts certain kinds of people and the people in turn either reinforce or evolve the culture based on their values and what they’re like. If you choose the right people with the right values and remain in sync with them, you will play beautiful jazz together. If you choose the wrong people, you will all go over the waterfall together.”
    9. “To be “good” something must operate consistently with the laws of reality and contribute to the evolution of the whole; that is what is most rewarded.”
    10. …human greatness and terribleness are not correlated with wealth or other conventional measures of success. I’ve also learned that judging people before really seeing things through their eyes stands in the way of understanding their circumstances–and that isn’t smart. I urge you to be curious enough to want to understand how the people who see things differently from you came to see them that way. You will find that interesting and invaluable, and the richer perspective you gain will help you decide what you should do.”
    11. “Everyone has weaknesses. They are generally revealed in the patterns of mistakes they make.”
    12. “Observe the patterns of mistakes to see if they are products of weaknesses.”
    13. “The best behaviors one can hope for come from leaders who can weigh the benefits of cooperation, and who have long enough time frames that they can see how the gifts they give this year may bring them benefits in the future.”
    14. “Ultimately, to help people succeed you have to do two things: First let them see their failures so clearly that they are motivated to change them, and then show them how to either change what they are doing or rely on others who are strong where they are weak.”
    15. “Distinguish between you as the designer of your machine and you as a worker with your machine. One of the hardest things for people to do is to objectively look down on themselves within their circumstances (i.e., their machine) so that they can act as the machine’s designer and manager. Most people remain stuck in the perspective of being a worker within the machine. If you can recognize the differences between those roles and that it is much more important that you are a good designer/manager of your life than a good worker in it, you will be on the right path. To be successful, the “designer/manager you” has to be objective about what the “worker you” is really like, not believing in him more than he deserves, or putting him in jobs he shouldn’t be in. Instead of having this strategic perspective, most people operate emotionally and in the moment; their lives are a series of undirected emotional experiences, going from one thing to the next. If you want to look back on your life and feel you’ve achieved what you wanted to, you can’t operate that way.”
    16. “To be principled means to consistently operate with principles that can be clearly explained. Unfortunately, most people can’t do that. And it’s very rare for people to write their principles down and share them.”
    17. “1. Don’t confuse what you wish were true with what is really true. 2. Don’t worry about looking good—worry instead about achieving your goals. 3. Don’t overweight first-order consequences relative to second- and third-order ones. 4. Don’t let pain stand in the way of progress. 5. Don’t blame bad outcomes on anyone but yourself.”
    18. “As a result, I tended to hire people who were the same way—who would dive right into challenges, figure out what to do about them, and then do it. I figured that if they had great character, common sense, and creativity, and were driven to achieve our shared mission, they would discover what it took to be successful if I gave them the freedom to figure out how to make the right decisions.”
    19. “Train, guardrail, or remove people; don’t rehabilitate them.”
    20. “I hated school because of my bad memory but when I was twelve I fell in love with trading the markets. To make money in the markets, one needs to be an independent thinker who bets against the consensus and is right.”
    21. “Remember that people typically don’t change all that much.”
    22. “To acquire principles that work, it’s essential that you embrace reality and deal with it well. Don’t fall into the common trap of wishing that reality worked differently than it does or that your own realities were different. Instead, embrace your realities and deal with them effectively. After all, making the most of your circumstances is what life is all about. This includes being transparent with your thoughts and open-mindedly accepting the feedback of others. Doing so will dramatically increase your learning.”
    23. “Reflect and remind yourself that an accurate criticism is the most valuable feedback you can receive.”
    24. “If you are not aggressive, you are not going to make money, and if you are not defensive, you are not going to keep money.”
    25. “Most of life’s greatest opportunities come out of moments of struggle; it’s up to you to make the most of these tests of creativity and character.”
    26. “Help people through the pain that comes with exploring their weaknesses. Emotions tend to heat up during most disagreements, especially when the subject is someone’s weaknesses. Speak in a calm, slow, and analytical manner to facilitate communication.”
    27. “Leonard Mlodinow, in his excellent book Subliminal, writes, “We usually assume that what distinguishes us [from other species] is IQ. But it is our social IQ that ought to be the principal quality that differentiates us.”
    28. “My business has always been a way to get me into exotic places and allow me to meet interesting people. If I make any money from those trips, that’s just icing on the cake.”
    29. “Reality exists at different levels and each of them gives you different but valuable perspectives. It’s important to keep all of them in mind as you synthesize and make decisions, and to know how to navigate between them. Let’s say you’re looking at your hometown on Google Maps. Zoom in close enough to see the buildings and you won’t be able to see the region surrounding your town, which can tell you important things. Maybe your town sits next to a body of water. Zoom in too close and you won’t be able to tell if the shoreline is along a river, a lake, or an ocean. You need to know which level is appropriate to your decision.”
    30. “Knowing how people operate and being able to judge whether that way of operating will lead to good results is more important than knowing what they did.”
    31. “My approach was to hire, train, test, and then fire or promote quickly, so that we could rapidly identify the excellent hires and get rid of the ordinary ones, repeating the process again and again until the percentage of those who were truly great was high enough to meet our needs.”
    32. “Every leader must decide between 1) getting rid of liked but incapable people to achieve their goals and 2) keeping the nice but incapable people and not achieving their goals. Whether or not you can make these hard decisions is the strongest determinant of your own success”
    33. “there are two broad approaches to decision making: evidence/logic-based (which comes from the higher- level brain) and subconscious/emotion-based (which comes from the lower-level animal brain).”
    34. “Bob Kegan called Bridgewater “a form of proof that the quest for business excellence and the search for personal realization need not be mutually exclusive—and can, in fact, be essential to each other.”
    35. “Most people assume that the challenges that go along with growing a large business are greater than those of growing a smaller one. That is not true. Going from a five-person organization to a sixty-person organization was just as challenging as going from a sixty-person organization to a seven-hundred-person organization—and from a seven-hundred-person organization to a 1,500-person one.”
    36. “Remember that people are built very differently and that different ways of seeing and thinking make people suitable for different jobs.”
    37. Investors think independently, anticipate things that haven’t happened yet, and put real money at stake with their bets. Policymakers come from environments that nurture consensus, not dissent, that train them to react to things that have already occurred, and that prepare them for negotiations, not placing bets. Because they don’t benefit from the constant feedback about the quality of their decisions that investors get, it’s not clear who the good and bad decision makers among them are.”
    38. “Having nothing to hide relieves stress and builds trust.”
    39. “In trading you have to be defensive and aggressive at the same time. If you are not aggressive, you are not going to make money, and if you are not defensive, you are not going to keep money.”
    40. “Remember that in great partnerships, consideration and generosity are more important than money.”
    41. “The most meaningful relationships are achieved when you and others can speak openly to each other about everything that’s important, learn together, and understand the need to hold each other accountable to be as excellent as you can be.”
    42. “While I used to get angry and frustrated at people because of the choices they made, I came to realize that they weren’t intentionally acting in a way that seemed counterproductive; they were just living out things as they saw them, based on how their brains worked.”
    43. “no manager at any level can expect to succeed without the skill set of an organizational engineer.”
    44. “Remember that the only purpose of money is to get you what you want, so think hard about what you value and put it above money. How much would you sell a good relationship for? There’s not enough money in the world to get you to part with a valued relationship.”
    45. “It’s more important to do big things well than to do the small things perfectly.”
    46. “The pain of problems is a call to find solutions rather than a reason for unhappiness and inaction, so it’s silly, pointless, and harmful to be upset at the problems and choices that come at you (though it’s understandable).”
    47. “Remember that most people are happiest when they are improving and doing the things that suit them naturally and help them advance. So learning about your people’s weaknesses is just as valuable (for them and for you) as is learning their strengths.”
    48. “The most valuable habit I’ve acquired is using pain to trigger quality reflections. If you can acquire this habit yourself, you will learn what causes your pain and what you can do about it, and it will have an enormous impact on your effectiveness.”
    49. “When a problem occurs, conduct the discussion at two levels: 1) the machine level (why that outcome was produced) and 2) the case-at-hand level (what to do about it).”
    50. “If you can’t successfully do something, don’t think you can tell others how it should be done”
    51. “Truth – more precisely, an accurate understanding of reality – is the essential foundation for producing good outcomes.”
    52. “It is far more common for people to allow ego to stand in the way of learning.”
    53. “I learned that if you work hard and creatively, you can have just about anything you want, but not everything you want. Maturity is the ability to reject good alternatives in order to pursue even better ones.”
    54. “If you’re not failing, you’re not pushing your limits, and if you’re not pushing your limits, you’re not maximizing your potential”
    55. “Nature gave us pain as a messaging device to tell us that we are approaching, or that we have exceeded, our limits in some way.”
    56. “Having the basics—a good bed to sleep in, good relationships, good food, and good sex—is most important, and those things don’t get much better when you have a lot of money or much worse when you have less. And the people one meets at the top aren’t necessarily more special than those one meets at the bottom or in between.”
    57. “Pain + Reflection = Progress”
    58. “Principles are fundamental truths that serve as the foundations for behavior that gets you what you want out of life. They can be applied again and again in similar situations to help you achieve your goals.”
    59. “I just want to be right—I don’t care if the right answer comes from me.”
    60. “the happiest people discover their own nature and match their life to it.”
    61. “Imagine that in order to have a great life you have to cross a dangerous jungle. You can stay safe where you are and have an ordinary life, or you can risk crossing the jungle to have a terrific life. How would you approach that choice? Take a moment to think about it because it is the sort of choice that, in one form or another, we all have to make.”
    62. “Listening to uninformed people is worse than having no answers at all.”
    63. “Every time you confront something painful, you are at a potentially important juncture in your life—you have the opportunity to choose healthy and painful truth or unhealthy but comfortable delusion.
    64. Time is like a river that carries us forward into encounters with reality that require us to make decisions. We can’t stop our movement down this river and we can’t avoid those encounters. We can only approach them in the best possible way.”
    65. “Because our educational system is hung up on precision, the art of being good at approximations is insufficiently valued. This impedes conceptual thinking.”
    66. “Unattainable goals appeal to heroes,”
    67. “Look for people who have lots of great questions. Smart people are the ones who ask the most thoughtful questions, as opposed to thinking they have all the answers. Great questions are a much better indicator of future success than great answers.”
    68. “first principle: • Think for yourself to decide 1) what you want, 2) what is true, and 3) what you should do to achieve #1 in light of #2 . . . . . . and do that with humility and open-mindedness so that you consider the best thinking available to you.”
    69. To be effective you must not let your need to be right be more important than your need to find out what’s true. If you are too proud of what you know or of how good you are at something you will learn less, make inferior decisions, and fall short of your potential.”
    70. “Pay for the person, not the job. Look at what people in comparable jobs with comparable experience and credentials make, add some small premium over that, and build in bonuses or other incentives so they will be motivated to knock the cover off the ball. Never pay based on the job title alone.”
    71. “I saw that to do exceptionally well you have to push your limits and that, if you push your limits, you will crash and it will hurt a lot. You will think you have failed—but that won’t be true unless you give up.”
    72. “The greatest gift you can give someone is the power to be successful. Giving people the opportunity to struggle rather than giving them the things they are struggling for will make them stronger.”
    73. “Above all else, I want you to think for yourself, to decide 1) what you want, 2) what is true and 3) what to do about it”
    74. “Meditate. I practice Transcendental Meditation and believe that it has enhanced my open-mindedness, higher-level perspective, equanimity, and creativity. It helps slow things down so that I can act calmly even in the face of chaos, just like a ninja in a street fight. I’m not saying that you have to meditate in order to develop this perspective; I’m just passing along that it has helped me and many other people and I recommend that you seriously consider exploring it.”
    75. “I also feared boredom and mediocrity much more than I feared failure. For me, great is better than terrible, and terrible is better than mediocre, because terrible at least gives life flavor. The high school yearbook quote my friends chose for me was from Thoreau: “If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.”
    76. “Managers who do not understand people’s different thinking styles cannot understand how the people working for them will handle different situations.”
    77. “Focus more on making the pie bigger than on exactly how to slice it so that you or anyone else gets the biggest piece. The best negotiations are the ones with someone in which I say, “You should take more,” and they argue back, “No you should take more!” People who operate this way with each other make the relationship better and the pie bigger—and both benefit in the long run.”
    78. “d. In designing your organization, remember that the 5-Step Process is the path to success and that different people are good at different steps. Assign specific people to do each of these steps based on their natural inclinations. For example, the big-picture visionary should be responsible for goal setting, the taste tester should be assigned the job of identifying and not tolerating problems, the logical detective who doesn’t mind probing people should be the diagnoser, the imaginative designer should craft the plan to make the improvements, and the reliable taskmaster should make sure the plan gets executed. Of course, some people can do more than one of these things—generally people do two or three well. Virtually nobody can do them all well. A team should consist of people with all of these abilities and they should know who is responsible for which steps.”
    79. “The most important thing is that you develop your own principles and ideally write them down, especially if you are working with others.”
    80. “There were only two big forces to worry about: growth and inflation.”
    81. “Weigh second- and third-order consequences.”
    82. “Distinguish between you as the designer of your machine and you as a worker with your machine.”
    83. “The evolutionary process of productive adaption and ascent—the process of seeking, obtaining, and pursuing more and more ambitious goals—does not just pertain to how individuals and society move forward. It is equally relevant when dealing with setbacks, which are inevitable. At some point in your life you will crash in a big way. You might fail at your job or with your family, lose a loved one, suffer a serious accident or illness, or discover the life you imagined is out of reach forever. There are a whole host of ways that something will get you . At such times, you will be in pain and might think that you don’t have the strength to go on. You almost always do, however; your ultimate success will depend on you realizing that fact, even though it might not seem that way at the moment.This is why many people who have endured setbacks that seems devastating at the time ended up happy as (or even happier than) they originally were after they successfully adapted to them. The quality of your life will depend on the choices you make at those painful moments. The faster one appropriately adapts, the better. No matter what you want out of life, your ability to adapt and move quickly and efficiently through the process of personal evolution will determine your success and your happiness. If you do it well, you can cahnge your psychological reaction to it so that what was painful can become something you crave.”
    84. “When encountering your weaknesses you have four choices: 1. You can deny them (which is what most people do). 2. You can accept them and work at them in order to try to convert them into strengths (which might or might not work depending on your ability to change). 3. You can accept your weaknesses and find ways around them. 4. Or, you can change what you are going after. Which solution you choose will be critically important to the direction of your life. The worst path you can take is the first.”
    85. “I saw pain as nature’s reminder that there is something important for me to learn.”
    86. “Typically, by doing what comes naturally to us, we fail to account for our weaknesses, which leads us to crash. What happens after we crash is most important. Successful people change in ways that allow them to continue to take advantage of their strengths while compensating for their weaknesses and unsuccessful people don’t.”
    87. “Over the course of our lives, we make millions and millions of decisions that are essentially bets, some large and some small. It pays to think about how we make them because they are what ultimately determine the quality of our lives.”
    88. “Making a handful of good uncorrelated bets that are balanced and leveraged well is the surest way of having a lot of upside without being exposed to unacceptable downside.”
    89. “Remember not to be overconfident in your assessments, as it’s possible you are wrong.”
    90. “What was most important wasn’t knowing the future—it was knowing how to react appropriately to the information available at each point in time.”
    91. “Remember that weaknesses don’t matter if you find solutions.”
    92. “To be principled means to consistently operate with principles that can be clearly explained.”
    93. “what was most important wasn’t knowing the future—it was knowing how to react appropriately to the information available at each point in time.”
    94. “Don’t hire people just to fit the first job they will do; hire people you want to share your life with.”
    95. “I should add, though, that putting responsibility in the hands of inexperienced people doesn’t always work out so well. Some painful lessons that you’ll read about later taught me that it can be a mistake to undervalue experience.”
    96. “As much as I love and have benefited from artificial intelligence, I believe that only people can discover such things and then program computers to do them. That’s why I believe that the right people, working with each other and with computers, are the key to success.”
    97. “Understand the differences between managing, micromanaging, and not managing.”
    98. “The key is to fail, learn, and improve quickly. If you’re constantly learning and improving, your evolutionary process will be ascending. Do do it poorly, it will be descending. So I believe evolving is life’s greatest accomplishment and its greatest award.”
    99. “It’ll be decades—and maybe never—before the computer can replicate many of the things that the brain can do in terms of imagination, synthesis, and creativity. That’s because the brain comes genetically programmed with millions of years of abilities honed through evolution. The “science” of decision making that underlies many computer systems remains much less valuable than the “art.”
    100. “When a line of reasoning is jumbled and confusing, it’s often because the speaker has gotten caught up in below-the-line details without connecting them back to the major points.
    101. no matter what asset class one held, there would come a time when it would lose most of its value. This included cash, which is the worst investment over time because it loses value after adjusting for inflation and taxes.
    102. “Remember that most people will pretend to operate in your interest while operating in their own.”
    103. “circumstances life brings you, you will be more likely to succeed and find happiness if you take responsibility for making your decisions well instead of complaining about things being beyond your control”
    104. “You better make sense of what happened to other people in other times and other places because if you don’t you won’t know if these things can happen to you and, if they do, you won’t know how to deal with them.”
    105. “Around this time, McDonald’s had conceived of a new product, the Chicken McNugget, but they were reluctant to bring it to market because of their concern that chicken prices might rise and squeeze their profit margins. Chicken producers like Lane wouldn’t agree to sell to them at a fixed price because they were worried that their costs would go up and they would be squeezed. As I thought about the problem, it occurred to me that in economic terms a chicken can be seen as a simple machine consisting of a chick plus its feed. The most volatile cost that the chicken producer needed to worry about was feed prices. I showed Lane how to use a mix of corn and soymeal futures to lock in costs so they could quote a fixed price to McDonald’s. Having greatly reduced its price risk, McDonald’s introduced the McNugget in 1983. I felt great about helping make that happen.”
    106. “Remember that when it comes to assessing people, the two biggest mistakes you can make are being overconfident in your assessment and failing to get in sync on it.”
    107. “However, rather than blindly following the computer’s recommendations, I would have the computer work in parallel with my own analysis and then compare the two. When the computer’s decision was different from mine, I would examine why. Most of the time, it was because I had overlooked something. In those cases, the computer taught me. But sometimes I would think about some new criteria my system would’ve missed, so I would then teach the computer. We helped each other.”
    108. “People who do this fail because they are stubbornly stuck in their own heads.”
    109. “Learn about your people and have them learn about you through frank conversations about mistakes and their root causes.”
    110. “If something went badly, you had to put it in the log, characterize its severity, and make clear who was responsible for it. If a mistake happened and you logged it, you were okay. If you didn’t log it, you would be in deep trouble.”
    111. “I’ve often thought that parents and schools overemphasize the value of having the right answers all the time. It seems to me that the best students in school tend to be the worst at learning from their mistakes, because they have been conditioned to associate mistakes with failure instead of opportunity.”
    112. “I believe one of the most valuable things you can do to improve your decision making is to think through your principles for making decisions, write them out in both words and computer algorithms, back-test them if possible, and use them on a real-time basis to run in parallel with your brain’s decision making.”
    113. “you choose to push through this often painful process of personal evolution, you will naturally “ascend” to higher and higher levels.”
    114. “When faced with a choice between achieving their goal or pleasing (or not disappointing) others, they would choose achieving their goal every time.”
    115. “While it’s easier to avoid confrontations in the short run, the consequences of doing so can be massively destructive in the long term. It’s critical that conflicts actually get resolved—not through superficial compromise, but through seeking the important, accurate conclusions.”
    116. “Know that nobody can see themselves objectively. While we should all strive to see ourselves objectively, we shouldn’t expect everyone to be able to do that well. We all have blind spots; people are by definition subjective. For this reason, it is everyone’s responsibility to help others learn what is true about themselves by giving them honest feedback, holding them accountable, and working through disagreements in an open-minded way.”
    117. “Teach and reinforce the merits of mistake-based learning. To encourage people to bring their mistakes into the open and analyze them objectively, managers need to foster a culture that makes this normal and that penalizes suppressing or covering up mistakes.”
    118. “Don’t be afraid to fix the difficult things.”
    119. “Getting a lot of attention for being successful is a bad position to be in.”
    120. “Slow down your thinking so you can note the criteria you are using to make your decision.”
    121. “Diagnose Problems to Get at Their Root Causes”
    122. “Be evidence- based and encourage others to be the same.”
    123. “there are far fewer types of people in the world than there are people and far fewer different types of situations than there are situations, so matching the right types of people to the right types of situations is key.”
    124. “While making money was good, having meaningful work and meaningful relationships was far better. To me, meaningful work is being on a mission I become engrossed in, and meaningful relationships are those I have with people I care deeply about and who care deeply about me. Think about it: It’s senseless to have making money as your goal as money has no intrinsic value—its value comes from what it can buy, and it can’t buy everything. It’s smarter to start with what you really want, which are your real goals, and then work back to what you need to attain them. Money will be one of the things you need, but it’s not the only one and certainly not the most important one once you get past having the amount you need to get what you really want. When thinking about the things you really want, it pays to think of their relative values so you weigh them properly. In my case, I wanted meaningful work and meaningful relationships equally, and I valued money less—as long as I had enough to take care of my basic needs. In thinking about the relative importance of great relationships and money, it was clear that relationships were more important because there is no amount of money I would take in exchange for a meaningful relationship, because there is nothing I could buy with that money that would be more valuable. So, for me, meaningful work and meaningful relationships were and still are my primary goals and everything I did was for them. Making money was an incidental consequence of that. In the late 1970s, I began sending my observations about the markets to clients via telex. The genesis of these Daily Observations (“ Grains and Oilseeds,” “Livestock and Meats,” “Economy and Financial Markets”) was pretty simple: While our primary business was in managing risk exposures, our clients also called to pick my brain about the markets. Taking those calls became time-consuming, so I decided it would be more efficient to write down my thoughts every day so others could understand my logic and help improve it. It was a good discipline since it forced me to research and reflect every day. It also became a key channel of communication for our business. Today, almost forty years and ten thousand publications later, our Daily Observations are read, reflected on, and argued about by clients and policymakers around the world. I’m still writing them, along with others at Bridgewater, and expect to continue to write them until people don’t care to read them or I die.”
    125. “I didn’t value experience as much as character, creativity, and common sense, which I suppose was related to my having started Bridgewater two years out of school myself, and my belief that having an ability to figure things out is more important than having specific knowledge of how to do something. It seemed to me, young people were creating sensible innovation that was exciting.”
    126. “Great cultures bring problems and disagreements to the surface and solve them well, and they love imagining and building great things that haven’t been built before.”
    127. “If you want to have a community of people who have both high-quality, long-term relationships and a high sense of personal responsibility, you can’t allow a sense of entitlement to creep in.”
    128. “Don’t have anything to do with closed-minded people. Being open-minded is much more important than being bright or smart.”

 

References

  1. CNBC
    • Ray Dalio says ‘greatest tragedy of mankind’ is people clinging to wrong opinions
      Link
  2. Goodreads

 

 

Church in Society ( 2017-Oct )

Background

Again, this is an area, I will rather not go.

Yet, it is one that stirs our conscience and thoughts.

And, that is reason enough to see what people are saying and why they are saying it.

Predication

Introduction

We all have our own bias and depositions.

And, it is best to lay them bare ahead of time.

Most of my comments will be based on what I have heard from others prior to anything that I will cover in this post.

It is often useful to have some foundational predisposition as that lessens the opportunity to be swayed within each decision point.

Even better when commentators are not even speaking specifically on the new material.

Earlier Words

  1. Damon Thompson
    • Sometimes God places something in our heart, but unfortunately so much  of what has gone out in the Prophetic World was not undergirded in scripture
    • And, so I, Damon Thompson, need the foundation of Scripture
  2. Neil Ellis
    • This is a Church of matured faith
    • You have been preaching, but you were fearful of how the preaching will be accepted
    • Sometimes the Devil magnifies things and makes them appear more than they really are
    • Sometimes as a pastor what makes us press even though there is “Hell on the Outside” is that we are satisfied that we have the confidence of the people inside
    • Can the Lord trust you, and can the Bishop/Leadership depend on you?
    • Free your Spirit, but challenge your people
    • A faith that has not been tested, is a faith that can not be trusted
  3. Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
    • Sotomayor was asked to explain her remarks from a 2001 speech in which she said she agreed that “there is no objective stance but only a series of perspectives — no neutrality, no escape from choice in judging.”  She told the committee that, in every case, the two opposing parties view the facts from vastly different perspectives. “You can’t just throw up your hands and say I’m not going to rule,” she said. There is a choice in judging, which means “you have to rule.”

Videos

Here are some of the videos that I will later comment on.

  1. Paula White
    • Trump’s spiritual adviser: More devout than you…
      Donald Trump’s spiritual adviser, televangelist Paula White, spoke to CNN’s Erin Burnett in August about the Republican presidential nominee’s faith and the phone call that kicked off their friendship.
      Channel :- CNN
      Published On :- 2016-Oct-20th
      Link
    • Inauguration
      • Meet The Woman Who Many Call President Elect Donald Trump’s Spiritual Adviser | NBC Nightly News
        Critics have slammed her as a charlatan, but in a rare interview with NBC’s Anne Thompson, Paula White defends her message and gives insight into the president-elect’s beliefs.
        Channel :- NBC News
        Published On :- 2017-Jan-19th
        Link
    • Jim Baker
      • Two Corinthians’ Gaffe Was ‘A Setup
        • RWW News: Paula White Says That Trump’s ‘Two Corinthians’ Gaffe Was ‘A Setup’
          Published On :- 2017-August-23th
          Link
      • Opposition to God
        • RWW News: Paula White Says Opposition To President Trump Is Opposition To God
          Published On :- 2017-August-21st
          Link
  2. Pastor Jamal Bryant
    • Pastor Jamal Bryant – The problem with Paula White…
      Published On :- 2017-August-25th
      Link
  3. Roland Martin
    • Roland Martin To Paula White: Be A Prophetic Voice And Don’t Just Be A Profitable Voice
      Roland Martin rips Pastor Paula White for her partisan comments about Donald Trump: Be a prophetic voice and don’t just be a profitable voice.
      Published On :- 2017-August-23th
      Link

 

Leadership

Seated Under

Those in leadership do not always get to take a day off.

Not only does what they think matter, but also how they got there.

I have grown from listening in person or via youtube to the people listed above.

And, that makes me forever grateful.

Influencing Capital

The further we grow, the more influencing capital we personally have and have access to.

After long and hard battles our role will be examined; especially if our role is seen to have moved the needle towards an unexpected end.

Unfortunately it is not just our choice that is examined, but the totality of our live.

Circumference of Relationships

Relationships often covers so much space.

And, some of those spaces overlap and are not necessarily disjointed.

And, so even within a body, for instance Faith community, uniformity does not necessarily translate to conformity.

People sometimes reach different conclusions and they should be free to do so.

This is more so where there are personal relationships with those that are being discussed.

 

In Essentials Unity, In Nonessentials Liberty, In All Things Charity

Link
Philip Schaff, the distinguished nineteenth-century church historian, calls the saying in our title “the watchword of Christian peacemakers” (History of the Christian Church, vol. 7, p. 650). Often attributed to great theologians such as Augustine, it comes from an otherwise undistinguished German Lutheran theologian of the early seventeenth century, Rupertus Meldenius. The phrase occurs in a tract on Christian unity written (circa 1627) during the Thirty Years War (1618–1648), a bloody time in European history in which religious tensions played a significant role.

 

Sola Scriptura

  1. Laws of Social Responsibility
    If ever you take your neighbor’s cloak in pledge, you shall return it to him before the sun goes down, for that is his only covering, and it is his cloak for his body; in what else shall he sleep? And if he cries to me, I will hear, for I am compassionate.
    You shall not curse God, nor curse a ruler of your people. ( Exodus 22:27-28 )
  2. Paul Before the Sanhedrin
    • But those standing nearby said, “How dare you insult the high priest of God!”
      “Brothers, Paul replied, “I was not aware that he was the high priest, for it is written: ‘Do not speak evil about the ruler of your people.’”
      ( Acts 23:4-5 )
  3. David, Saul, Jonathan, & Mephibosheth
    • And Mephibosheth the son of Saul came down to meet the king. He had neither taken care of his feet nor trimmed his beard nor washed his clothes, from the day the king departed until the day he came back in safety. ( 2nd Samuel 19:24 )
    • He answered, “My lord, O king, my servant deceived me, for your servant said to him, ‘I will saddle a donkey for myself, that I may ride on it and go with the king.’ For your servant is lame. ( 2nd Samuel 19:26 )
    • He has slandered your servant to my lord the king. But my lord the king is like the angel of God; do therefore what seems good to you. ( 2nd Samuel 19:27 )
    • For all my father’s house were but men doomed to death before my lord the king, but you set your servant among those who eat at your table. What further right have I, then, to cry to the king?” ( 2nd Samuel 19:28 )
    • And the king said to him, “Why speak any more of your affairs? I have decided: you and Ziba shall divide the land.” ( 2nd Samuel 19:29 )
    • Mephibosheth said to the king, “Let him even take it all, since my lord the king has come safely to his own house.” ( 2nd Samuel 19:30 )

Summary

In summary I find myself always returning to a couple of words :-

  1. Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad
    • Allah’s hand of protection is with the maintenance of unity, you should beware of division.
    • The one isolated from the group is a prey to Satan, just as the one isolated from the flock is a prey to the wolves
    • You can not base a spiritual life on suspiciousness, cursing and allocating blame.
  2. Abraham Lincoln
    • I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go. My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for that day.”

Closing

Love never fails … for we know in part and we prophesy in part.

Malcolm & Steve Kerr – The Story of a father and his Son

By: Chris Korman
June 3, 2015
Link

Hours after finding out his father had been shot twice in the head and killed on the other side of the world, Steve Kerr sat on the bed in his dorm room at the University of Arizona and received teammates who came to offer condolences.

Lute Olson, the first-year coach who’d been desperate enough to give Kerr a spot on his team, sat there with him.

What most of Kerr’s old teammates remember is that he did not have much to say.

He had, upon hearing the news via phone from a family friend, gone running into the streets aimlessly.

He was calmer now.

It was the middle of the night. The players were bewildered. Their coaches had knocked loudly, pushing them from slumber toward a room where an 18-year-old boy they were just getting to know was dealing with the loss of his father far away from family; one brother was in Cairo, another remained in Lebanon with their mother and his sister was in Taiwan.

 

Malcolm Kerr, a devoted academic not even 18 months into his dream job as the president of the American University in Beirut, built his life around bridging the divide between Christians, Muslims, and Jews when, for most Americans, those matters were abstract and distant.

They weighed heavily on President Ronald Reagan, who released a statement:

“Dr. Kerr’s untimely and tragic death at the hands of these despicable assassins must strengthen our resolve not to give in to the acts of terrorists. Terrorism must not be allowed to take control of the lives, actions, or future of ourselves and our friends.”

Malcolm Kerr’s death, on Jan. 18, 1984, would become national news — a dispatch on terrorism in a land roiled by strife, another in a long scroll of warnings about how religious beliefs would lead to violence there for decades to come — but before the story spread it was a simple fact that a team of young basketball players found difficult to believe, let alone begin to comprehend.

Pete Williams, a junior college transfer who would lead the team in scoring, remembers the night as a blur.

“There was a commotion, so much commotion, but I don’t remember much beyond that other than how shocked we were, how unreal it all felt,” he said. “We didn’t think about terrorism then. Ever.”

Even Kerr, who was born in Lebanon and had witnessed the civil war tearing the country apart, would later say he never imagined this sort of thing could happen to his family.

Players lingered on the balcony outside – the building was once a hotel – and stared out into the night, unsure of what to say or how to help their teammate move forward.

Kerr didn’t fly to Beirut for services after his father’s death.

Instead, he attended practice and played against Arizona State. He hit 5-of-7 shots in a 71-49 win. It was Kerr’s best game of his freshman season.

The Wildcats would win eight of their final 14 games to finish 11-17. Arizona hasn’t had a losing record since.

“A bunch of us gave him a nickname, and I don’t really know if it’s out there much,” said Brock Brunkhorst a guard on the team. “We called him Ice. Because that’s just how he was.”

Four years later, when Arizona State fans chanted derogatory comments about his father, he hit six 3-pointers in the first half.

He was just so [expletive] angry,” said Bruce Fraser, one of his best friends on the team and a current assistant with Golden State. “But that was Steve. He could turn it toward the court and win.”

By then Kerr had become an unlikely force in hauling Arizona from the bottom of Division I basketball to the Final Four, paving the path for Olson’s historic run.

Yet his teammates couldn’t imagine what was next.

Kerr’s 15-year NBA career, his five rings, the winning shot off a feed from Michael Jordan in the decisive game six of the 1997 finals, the career 45.4 percent shooting from 3-point, still the best in association history, none of that seemed remotely possible for the guard who’d used guile and a fierce competitive streak to fashion himself into a solid college player.

What they could have imagined, though, is Kerr as a head coach molding a talented team into a great one capable of playing for a championship. Kerr’s Golden State Warriors will do just that starting Thursday, when they face LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals.

He thought about the game at a high level and cared deeply about learning how to make disparate pieces come together. Coaching was his dream, too, he confided to teammates, though he figured he’d have to work his way through the college ranks after school.

But this is Kerr’s first season as a head coach, after two stints as a television analyst and one as the general manager of the Phoenix Suns.

The delay had everything to do with family.

“I think all along, Steve was waiting for his kids to grow up a little bit and spread out before he got back into coaching,” Fraser said. “He knew that being an analyst or even a GM didn’t really do it for him; it didn’t get him close enough to it. He had to have more at stake to feel fulfilled. He was right all along: He was made to be a coach.

“But he was never going to do that while his kids were younger and he could be around them. He had more chances than anybody knows about, and it never swayed him.

Two of Kerr’s three children are in college in California now; the fact that his daughter, Maddy plays volleyball at Cal was a factor in Kerr’s decision to spurn mentor Phil Jackson’s offer to coach the New York Knicks, Fraser said.

“He’s a doting father,” Fraser said. “His kids are everything to him. And I think that says a lot about how he felt about his own dad.

Kerr has not spoken frequently about his father, though he also has periodically used the league’s bright spotlight to echo Malcolm Kerr’s call for peace and understanding, as when he opposed the invasion of Iraq following the terrorist attacks of September 11.

Last month, he reflected on his father, telling the San Jose Mercury News“I feel his full impact on my whole life. It’s there every day.”

Kerr’s sister and mother both wrote books about dealing with Malcolm’s death, and his brother, Andrew, worked in national security and eventually uncovered details about who killed his father. Though several factions initially took credit for the murder, the family eventually traced it to Hezbollah, the Iranian-funded Islamic organization within Lebanon.

Though Kerr’s basketball career made him the most recognizable member of the family, he dealt with his grief mostly silently, as was usually his way.

Fraser believes it changed him in two ways immediately, though.

“It feels strange to say this, but I’ve thought about it for a while and I believe it,” he said. “I think the death of his father helped Steve as a basketball player, because he realized it was just basketball. He was more worldly than most of us already because of his background, but this changed his whole outlook.

With shooters, it’s all about how you respond to a missed shot. And for Steve, who is the most competitive person I know, there just wasn’t anything to get upset about anymore. The weight of a miss, the weight of a loss, the weight of a big moment … they just didn’t mean anything to him anymore.

“That, and his father’s death made him turn to the team as family. He became really vested in the players there and what Lute was trying to do.”

The Wildcats weren’t a particularly close team during Kerr’s first season. Olson was the third coach in as many years, and he’d built his first squad around two junior college transfers and a promising young guard named Michael Tait. He added Kerr – who had little interest from other Division I schools – after noticing him while scouting younger players.

Kerr’s signing at first seemed to underscore how dire things had become. He could shoot the ball but do little else. Athletically he wasn’t anywhere close to being Division I caliber, and the other players knew it. Kerr struggled in the team’s earliest pickup games, unable to keep up on offense or defense.

“I went back to my dorm room the first time we played and told my roommate, a team manager, that I couldn’t understand why this new coach would ever sign this guy,” Brunkhorst said.

Within the confines of Olson’s team-oriented system, though, Kerr began to flourish. Off the court, he gained the admiration of teammates with his self-deprecating sense of humor and relentless honesty.

“He was just a great dude, in every way,” Williams said. “You can say something good about somebody because they’re nice, but it was more than that with Steve, it went deeper. He wanted the best in you, to help you find it. And he hasn’t changed at all. That’s the amazing part.”

When Fraser rejoined Kerr with Golden State – he’d worked for him as a scout in Phoenix – he and other former Arizona players scoffed at the notion that Kerr wasn’t ready to be a head coach.

“I knew Harrison Barnes wasn’t happy with his role last year, and was thinking that he maybe should move on,” Fraser said. “So I asked him recently what happened to get him to stay.”

Kerr had flown to visit Barnes during the offseason, and the meeting went well.

“But I wasn’t sure why,” Fraser said. “Harrison just told me, ‘I asked him every difficult question I could think of, and he answered honestly. That’s all I want.’ ”

Kerr let the Warriors keep some traditions left over from former coach Mark Jackson, and even adopted some of his on-court strategy while working his own ideas – he’d been the beneficiary of the Triangle Offense in Chicago – into the mix. League MVP Steph Curry has heaped praise on Kerr for the way he’s handled the team.

Fraser and Kerr passed briefly at the team’s facility on Sunday morning, where both men were trying to keep busy as they waited for the series with the Cavaliers to begin. They had little to say to each other.

“I told him that after 30 years it had turned into a bad marriage,” Fraser said. “But at least we’re comfortable with silence.”

Fraser can’t recall ever talking to Kerr about his father’s death, or hearing him say anything beyond how much he appreciated Malcolm Kerr.

There was one way it did change their friendship, though slowly. Without stating it, they started opting for comedies instead of action movies whenever they went to the theater.

That way Kerr could sit peacefully, instead of wincing each time a gun went off on screen.

Steve Kerr – Leadership Lessons

By Mackey Craven
OpenView
Published On :- 2017-July-17th

Link

True leadership springs from a deep understanding of simple but profound tenets that can be successfully applied to any team scenario, whether the team in question is setting league records or building a company. Earlier this year, at OpenView’s CEO Forum, I had the chance to speak with one of the great leaders in sports today – Steve Kerr, head coach of the Golden State Warriors.

Kerr’s NBA career highlights reel features an impressive series of accomplishments. As a player, he was a five-time NBA champion with the Chicago Bulls (three rings) and the San Antonio Spurs (two rings). To date, his record for the highest career three-point percentage (45.4%) remains unbroken. Kerr’s winning streak continued when he transitioned into coaching. In his first season as head coach he led the Warriors to win the 2015 NBA Championship, in 2016 he was named NBA Coach of the Year as the Warriors set an NBA record 73-win season, and as of this article’s publication, the Warriors won another NBA Championship (congratulations!).

 

I talked with Kerr about his leadership style and philosophy given the parallels between his role and that of a startup CEO. Both coach and CEO work hard to get the most out of their teams – encouraging high-performing individuals to work together to win against an incredibly challenging field of competitors. Both are working in a fast-paced environment with high stakes, big personalities and many do-or-die moments.

My conversation with Kerr surfaced a number of insights that can help CEOs of expansion-stage software companies motivate and manage their teams more effectively so they can achieve the kind of dominance the Golden State Warriors see on the court.

Find your mentors, but be true to yourself

Kerr’s first observation about the most important leadership lessons he’s learned from his experience with the Warriors combined two, seemingly opposite ideas: seeking out mentors and being yourself. After he explained, however, the combination made complete sense.

“One of the things I did for a couple of years before I got the head coach job with the Warriors was to visit as many coaches as I could – especially the ones I admired – and really pick their brains, ” Kerr recalls. He met with legendary coaches including Phil Jackson, Gregg Popovich, Lute Olson, Lenny Wilkens and Pete Carroll. “I was able to get an in-depth look at their teams and staffs, and they shared with me the mistakes they’d made as young coaches as well as how they got better as they went along.”

But, even as Kerr was taking in all this wisdom from all these star coaches, he realized that no one person had all the right answers. “The main theme that came across over and over again in these conversations was be yourself,” he says. “There’s no point in trying to be someone else. You can emulate somebody else, but you can’t be someone else. As soon as you start quoting Vince Lombardi, players are going to know it’s fake.”

The bottom line is that while it’s wise to seek out and learn from mentors early on, you need to develop your own, authentic and genuine leadership philosophy and style.

Define your values

One of the most important pieces of advice that Kerr received while he was visiting with different mentors was to take the time to clearly define his philosophy, values and vision for the team. “One of the biggest things for me, as a coach, was the opportunity to implement the things that are most important to me and reflect my values,” Kerr explains. “Sharing those with your team and making those values part of your everyday existence in a way that comes from your heart is where you’ll find traction.”

Kerr got some great tactical tips on how to identify his values when he went to Seattle to sit in on a training camp with Pete Carroll, coach for the Seahawks. “Pete told me to take a look at my own personality and write down the ten most important values in my life,” Kerr says. “Then, he told me to take those ten values and whittle them down to four by really thinking about what would be most important to me as a coach.” Kerr came away from that exercise with four clearly defined values that he has used ever since to guide the Warriors on a daily basis:

Joy

“We are the luckiest people on earth,” Kerr says. “We play basketball for a living. People dream of that, so we never, ever want to lose sight of the fact that this has got to be fun. We make sure that’s reflected each day – we joke around, make fun of each other and include stupid videos in our strategy sessions. Our guys laugh quite a bit.”

Competitiveness

“Winning has to matter, and to win at this level, you’d better be competitive,” Kerr says. “It’s important to keep score constantly, to always keep track of who is winning and who is losing, even in practices. But,” he adds, with a nod to the value of joy, “do it in a fun way.”

Mindfulness

“One of the trickiest things for a pro athlete is finding the balance between over thinking and not paying attention. There’s a sweet spot where you’re dialed in, but still loose,” Kerr says. “We’re always trying to find that balance and have found that mindfulness training can help.”

Compassion

“Playing in the NBA is a dream job, but it’s a difficult one, relatively speaking. Our guys aren’t digging ditches, but they do get booed and traded and cut and injured. It’s not easy,” Kerr says. “Players worry about their careers. They lose sleep when they’re not playing well. So, compassion is a big deal.”

Get to know your team

Another big element of Kerr’s leadership style is strong relationships – real, person-to-person relationships based on compassion, trust and respect. “As soon as I’d accepted the job with the Warriors, I called each of our fifteen players and in many cases traveled to see them,” Kerr says, recalling how he even flew to Australia to visit Andrew Bogut. “I wanted to make sure that I got to know each player on a personal level – find out about their families, who they are and what makes them tick.”

Kerr had learned this technique from coaches he’d played for and admired, including Popovich and Jackson. “I knew those guys cared about me because they went out of their way to find out about my kids and my wife and what I like to do in my free time,” Kerr recalls. “And once you know that they really care about you, then when they yell at you, it’s very acceptable.”

This initial “tour” to meet his players was a great chance for Kerr to spend quality time with his team, but it was also an opportunity for him to lay the initial groundwork for his vision. “I wanted to have my message really well put together for them, both individually and team-wise,” he says. “I wanted to be able to establish what we were looking to do as a team, our goals and where I saw each player fitting in before we even got on the practice floor.”

“It’s really important,” Kerr sums up, “for people underneath you to recognize that you care about them and that they are valued.”

Study your team’s strengths and weaknesses

Of course, an important part of getting to know your team is being able to assess their strengths and weaknesses. “In basketball, you try to be the best you can be based on your talent,” Kerr explains. “In the off-season you assess your weaknesses – which player can we get to fill that hole or to really strengthen a particular position. And then you play, and figure out how good you are.”

At the same time, you need to constantly assess the competition. “Each time you play a team, you are trying to find their weak spot and how do exploit it,” Kerr says. “And, on the flip side, you are also trying to protect your own weaknesses, knowing that other teams will be coming after you in those areas. It’s a constant process of evaluating where you are against the other teams.”

While evaluating your team is an important leadership role, it’s important to approach it with humility and respect. This becomes even more important when you’re heading up a group of high-performing individuals who are already extremely talented in their own right. “I was lucky to inherit a team that was skilled and talented, and it was important to acknowledge that,” Kerr says about when he initially joined the Warriors. “When I took the job, they had already won fifty games the previous year. We needed to come in as staff saying that we knew they were already good, but that we wanted to help them take the next step. The team appreciated that we came in with some humility.” And from there, the focus was on how they could all get better together.

This approach had a far-reaching effect not only on the existing team, but also in terms of recruiting. “One of the reasons we got Kevin Durant was that he had seen our culture from afar,” Kerr says. “He saw our desire to get better and work together. And he saw the fun we were having.”

Empower your team to take ownership

In 2016, Kerr missed the first half of the season – approximately forty games – due to a serious back injury. Despite not having their head coach on the sidelines, the Warriors had the best regular season record of all time in the NBA. While Kerr wasn’t happy about having to miss those games, his feelings are mitigated by the pride he felt in his team’s ability and performance.

“It’s almost like being a parent,” Kerr says. “You’re kids are getting older and you’re no longer telling them what to do all the time, but they’re still doing well. That’s when you know you’ve done a good job as a parent; and that’s kind of how I feel about coaching in general. I actually took a lot of pride in the fact that the team was doing so well while I was out because I recognized that the process had really performed from the previous year, and we were able to carry that over. That’s ultimately what you want.”

Getting to that point of team strength and capability takes a lot of work. “At the beginning of the season, it’s the coach’s job to lay out the vision for the team, but by the end of the season it’s the players’ team,” Kerr explains. “I might call a timeout once in awhile, or draw up a play; but most games, I just sit back and the players play. It’s their team. It’s our job to empower them and get them on the right track so they are equipped to take ownership.”

That’s kind of the end game for any leader – getting the team to take ownership of the plays. It’s the leader’s job to deliver the right vision, create the right environment, and provide the right guidance so that each team member can reach his or her highest potential. Sometimes, that takes some cheerleading, and sometimes it takes some constructive criticism. “Some people need a pat on the back, and others need a kick in the tail,” Kerr says. “I ask my staff all the time what each player needs – a confidence boost or a sharp stick.”

For the Warriors, Kerr has the team meet to watch and critique film each day for ten minutes before practice. “We go over what we are trying to accomplish as a group in a very practical way,” he adds. “The cheerleading comes in behind the scenes. If I were to constantly tell the team how great they are, it would be almost patronizing. But, it’s good for me to tell an individual player when they are doing great work. You need to be able to recognize what each person needs to hear and when they need to hear it. Each person is unique and each day is a little different.”

Steve Kerr On Leadership

Background

Life gives a few the opportunity to speak about the consternation, wrath, and burden of leadership, Steve Kerr happens to be one of those that faith places in the crosshair of leadership.

 

Video

  1. YouTube
    • First Impressions
      • Steve Kerr’s First Interaction with Michael Jordan
        Link
    • Gaining Respect
      • Michael Jordan talks about punching Steve Kerr in the face
        Link

Images

Punched in the Face by His Airness

Steve Kerr’s take

Phil Jackson’s Take

Story

STEVE KERR (AS TOLD TO CHRIS BALLARD)

Link
Sunday September 24th, 2017

We knew it was coming.

After Steph spoke up at media day on Friday, we figured it was just a matter of time until the president responded. Then on Saturday morning my wife, Margot, woke me up. “Here it is,” she said, and showed me Trump’s tweet. Our invitation, he wrote, “has been withdrawn” because, “going to the White House is considered a great honor for a championship team” and, “Stephen Curry is hesitating.”

First off, I’m pretty sure Steph wasn’t “hesitating”. He made it clear he wouldn’t go. Second, as I joked to the media Saturday, it was like the president was trying to break up with us before we broke up with him.

Regardless, it’s a shame. I’ve been fortunate enough to meet President Reagan, both Bushes, Clinton, and Obama. I didn’t agree with all of them, but it was easy to set politics aside because each possessed an inherent respect for the office, as well as the humility that comes with being a public servant in an incredible position of power, representing 300 million people. And that’s the problem now. In his tweet to Steph, Trump talked about honoring the White House but, really, isn’t it you who must honor the White House, Mr. President? And the way to do that is through compassion and dignity and being above the fray. Not causing the fray.

Would we have gone? Probably not. The truth is we all struggled with the idea of spending time with a man who has offended us with his words and actions time and again. But I can tell you one thing: it wouldn’t have been for the traditional ceremony, to shake hands and smile for cameras. Internally, we’d discussed whether it’d be possible to just go and meet as private citizens and have a serious, poignant discussion about some of the issues we’re concerned about. But he’s made it hard for any of us to actually enter the White House, because what’s going on is not normal. It’s childish stuff: belittling people and calling them names. So to expect to go in and have a civil, serious discourse? Yeah, that’s probably not going to happen.

Look, I’m a basketball coach and what I do obviously pales in comparison to what the president does. But our jobs are similar in at least one respect: If you want to be an NBA coach, you need to be prepared to be criticized. You kind of know that going in. If I coach poorly and we lose the game, I hear about it. That’s okay. It’s really where we coaches earn our money, accepting and dealing with criticism and keeping the ship moving forward. There has to be an inherent understanding when you enter into any public position of power that this is what happens. People are going to take shots at you and it’s incumbent upon you to absorb those shots. Maybe you respond diplomatically, but you maintain a level of respect and dignity. What you can’t do is just angrily lash out. Can you imagine if I lashed out at all my critics every day and belittled them? I’d lose my players, I’d embarrass ownership, I’d embarrass myself. Pretty soon I’d be out of a job. It’s a basic adult thing that you learn as you grow up: People aren’t always going to agree with you. And that’s OK.

Instead, we get Trump’s comments over the weekend about NFL players, calling them ‘sons of bitches’ for kneeling during the anthem. Those just crushed me. Crushed me. Just think about what those players are protesting. They’re protesting excessive police violence and racial inequality. Those are really good things to fight against. And they’re doing it in a nonviolent way. Which is everything that Martin Luther King preached, right? A lot of American military members will tell you that the right to free speech is exactly what they fight for. And it’s just really, really upsetting that the leader of our country is calling for these players to be ‘fired.’

The hard part is knowing what to do now. Margot and I talked for a long time Saturday morning about what to say publicly. I’ve probably been as critical of Trump as anybody but maybe it’s time to take a different course. There’s no need to get into a war of words. It’s about trying to hang on to the values that are important to us as an organization, a country, and, really, as human beings.

The fact is we live in an amazing country, but it’s a flawed one. I consider myself unbelievably lucky to live here, so please spare me the ‘If you don’t like it you can get out’ argument. I love living here. I love my country. I just think it’s important to recognize that we as a nation are far from perfect, and it’s our responsibility to try to make it better. And one of the ways to do that is to promote awareness and understanding and acceptance. Not just acceptance but embracing our diversity, which when you get down to it is not only who we are but truly what makes us great. And it’s not happening.

Remember, the president works for us, not vice versa. We elected him. He doesn’t just work for his constituents and his base. He works for every citizen. Once you take that office, you have to do what’s best for the entire country. Sure, you’re going to have policies that align with your party, but that’s not the point. Respectfully, Mr. Trump, the point is this: You’re the president. You represent all of us. Don’t divide us.

Bring us together.

General Vincent K. Brooks

Background

In an age where voices can be reduced to soundbites, cliques and inflammatory comments and categorization.

In general finding the worst in each other and blanket statements about “what we have seen before“.

And, those buckets are based on National Origin and Religion.

How do we go forward?

And, so we ask ourselves how do we go forward or are we are just in a maze of bad choices, which leads to stillness, and assumption of a fetal position.

As I was watching an interview yesterday, I heard the name of Vincent Brooks.  I googled on his name and found a couple of freely and broadly accessible videos on youtube.

 

Video

  1. General Brooks discusses his biggest challenges and biggest successes in Iraq.
    Uploaded On :- 2011-May-4th
    Link
  2. GEN Brooks message
    US Pacific, 4 Star General
    Uploaded On :- 2013-July-22nd
    Link
  3. LTG Brooks West Point Visit.mov
    Lt. Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, Commander of 3rd Army, returns to his Alma Mater to speak to the Corps of Cadets about Army Leadership.
    Uploaded On :- 2012-April-10th

    Link

 

Indepth

GEN Brooks message, US Asia Pacific

  1. Command Video for Team 6
  2. Team Qualities
    • True test of a team is not missing a beat even as we change command
  3. Truly blessed to return the Four Star general to Asia Pacific since 1974
  4. Media
    • Another channel for me to air directly
    • It is not substitute to see and hear in person
  5. Opportunity
    • Training
      • Training our own and our partners and friends
    • Professionalism
      • Exporting professionalism
      • Your Professionalism will be available to our partners
        • Qualities
          • Be yourself
          • And, give each task your best effort
  6. Challenges
    • Fiscal Challenges
      • Fiscal challenges we have has a nation
        • Every dollar we are given, we have to stretch
        • Take care of our people and realize that we are fortunate to have the ones we have
    • Changing Culture
      • We can not allow practices that undermine our pride and the pride we feel as an Army
      • Eliminate Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault
        • Actions that leave trauma in unit and members of our team
        • Have a culture where this experiences are not able to occur
        • To do
          • Start with yourself
          • Allow others to make it go away
          • Set example for others to see
        • zero tolerance
        • Trust
    • Gratitude
      • Thanks for welcoming my wife and I

 

Simon O. Sinek

Profile

Wikipedia ( Link )
Simon O. Sinek (born October 9, 1973) is an author, speaker, and consultant who writes on leadership and management. He joined the RAND Corporation in 2010 as an adjunct staff member, where he advises on matters of military innovation and planning.

He is known for popularizing the concepts of “the golden circle” and to “Start With Why”, described by TED as “a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership all starting with a golden circle and the question “Why?”‘.

Sinek’s first TEDx Talk on “How Great Leaders Inspire Action” is the 3rd most viewed video on TED.com.

His 2009 book on the same subject, Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action (2009) delves into what he says is a naturally occurring pattern, grounded in the biology of human decision-making, that explains why we are inspired by some people, leaders, messages and organizations over others.

Early life and education
Sinek was born in Wimbledon, England; at a young age he moved to Johannesburg, South Africa, then to London, then to Hong Kong, before settling in New Jersey.

He earned a BA degree in cultural anthropology from Brandeis University; he attended City University in London with the intention of becoming a barrister, but left law school to go into advertising.

Sinek’s mother, Susan, is Jewish and of Hungarian Jewish descent.

Community and civic affairs
Active in the not-for-profit world, Sinek works with Count Me In, an organization committed to helping one million women-owned businesses reach a million dollars in revenues by 2012and he serves on the Board of Directors for Danspace Project, an organization that fends for advancing art and dance.

Discussions

  1. Simon Sinek on Millennials in the Workplace
    Excerpt of Simon Sinek from an episode of Inside Quest.

  2. Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action

 

InDepth

Simon Sinek on Millennials in the Workplace

  1. Life Transitions
    • When younger the only thing we need is our family
    • Alcohol & Drugs allow us to acculturate from our family into a broader tribe