HIV Prevention:- Medication

Background

Best said by medical practitioners and the press, we are going through an explosive recommendation and encouragement of medicine and medications.

For instance with HIV & AIDs, a new drug is awaiting FDA Approval.

The drug’s name is Cabotegravir.

Whereas Truvada and Descovy have to be taken daily, Cabotegravir only has to be taken as an injection every other month.

As an injection that only needs to be taken once every other month, it is hoped that it is less susceptible to forgetfulness and other natural human fallacies.

 

Glossary

Category Word Meaning
Medication Types
PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is medicine people at risk for HIV take to prevent getting HIV from sex or injection drug use.
When taken as prescribed, PrEP is highly effective for preventing HIV.
PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) means taking medicine to prevent HIV after a possible exposure.
PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after recent possible exposure to HIV.
Medication
Truvada Truvada is a pill form of PrEP that need to be taken daily for at least a week to be fully effective
Descovy Descovy is a pill form of PrEP that need to be taken daily for at least a week to be fully effective
Cabotegravir Cabotegravir is an injectable medication shown to be effective for HIV prevention in clinical trials.
It is pending FDA approval for use as PrEP.
If approved, it would only need to be injected once every two months.

 

Videos

PrEP

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

  1. PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)
    • Profile
      • PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is medicine people take to prevent getting HIV from sex or injection drug use.
        This video provides information about PrEP.
    • Videos
      • PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)
        Channel:- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
        Published On:- 2021-April-7th
        Added On:- 2021-December-9th
        Link
      • PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)
        Channel:- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
        Published On:- 2021-May-21st
        Added On:- 2021-December-9th
        Link

PEP

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

  1. HIV Prevention – Let’s Talk About PEP
    • Profile
      • This animation provides basic information on Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). PEP means taking medicine to prevent HIV after a possible exposure. PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started within 72 hours after recent possible exposure to HIV. This animation explains what PEP is, when and if it’s right for you, how to access PEP, how it works, what to expect, and how to pay for it.
    • Videos
      • HIV Prevention – Let’s Talk About PEP
        Channel:- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
        Published On:- 2021-May-21st
        Added On:- 2021-December-9th
        Link
      • HIV Prevention – Let’s Talk About PEP
        Channel:- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
        Published On:- 2021-May-21st
        Added On:- 2021-December-9th
        Link

Read Up

PrEP

Payment Option

Link

  1. Most insurance plans and state Medicaid programs cover PrEP.
    • There are also other programs that provide PrEP for free or at a reduced cost:
  2. Ready, Set, PrEP ( link ) makes PrEP medication available at no cost to those who qualify.
  3. Co-pay assistance programs ( link ) help lower the costs of PrEP medications.
    • Income is not a factor in eligibility.
  4. Some states have PrEP assistance ( link )
    • Some cover medication, some cover clinical visits and lab costs, and some cover both.

 

Starting and Stopping PrEP

Link

How can I start PrEP

  1. Before beginning PrEP, you must take an HIV test to make sure you don’t have HIV.
  2. While taking PrEP, you’ll have to visit your health care provider every 3 months for follow-up visits, HIV tests, and, prescription refills.

What if I need to stop taking PrEP?

There are several reasons why people stop taking PrEP:

  1. Your risk of getting HIV becomes low because of changes in your life.
  2. You don’t want to take a pill as prescribed or often forget to take your pills.
  3. You have side effects from the medicine that are interfering with your life.
  4. Blood tests show that your body is reacting to PrEP in unsafe ways.

 

Can I take PrEP just once, if I think I might have recently been exposed to HIV?

  1. PrEP is for people who are at ongoing risk for HIV.
  2. PrEP is not the right choice for people who may have been exposed to HIV in the last 72 hours.
  3. If you may have been exposed to HIV in the last 72 hours, talk to your health care provider, an emergency room doctor, or an urgent care provider about PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis).

PEP

Payment Option

Link

  1. How can I pay for PEP?
    • Depending on the reason you are prescribed PEP, you may qualify for free or low-cost PEP medicines.
  2. Paying for PEP After a Sexual Assault
    • You may qualify for partial or total reimbursement for medicines and clinical care costs.
    • Find resources available in your area ( Link )
  3. Paying for PEP After an Exposure at Work
    • Your workplace health insurance or workers’ compensation will usually pay for PEP.
  4. Paying for PEP for Another Reason
    • If you cannot get insurance coverage, your health care provider can apply for free PEP medicines through the medication assistance programs run by the manufacturers.
    • These requests for assistance can be handled urgently in many cases to avoid a delay in getting medicine.
    • Enrollment applications, such as Gilead’s Advancing Access form ( Link ) or NASTAD’s Patient Assistance tool ( Link ), can be completed online, over the phone, or by fax.

References

  1. ABC News
    • Dr. Sara Yumeen
      • CDC recommends dramatic expansion of HIV prevention medication
        Link
  2. CDC
    • HIV > HIV Basics > Prevention

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