HomeTeam History :- Know Thyself

 

Videos

  1. How Did Christianity Come To Africa?
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • How Did Christianity Come To Africa?
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2018-May-10th
          Link
  2. Top 10 African Tribes Taken In The Atlantic Slave Trade
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • Top 10 African Tribes Taken In The Atlantic Slave Trade
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2018-April-5th
          Link
  3. West African Ethnic Groups Who Claim Origin in Eastern Africa?
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • West African Ethnic Groups Who Claim Origin in Eastern Africa?
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2018-May-10th
          Link
  4. West and East African Connection
    • Profile
      • I discuss the connection between West Africa and East Africa and the numerous West African tribes that claim origin in East Africa!
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • West and East African Connection
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2014-March-17th
          Link
  5. Homosexuality in Africa
    • Videos
      • YouTube
        • West African Ethnic Groups Who Claim Origin in Eastern Africa?
          Channel :- HomeTeam History
          Published On :- 2015-June-7th
          Link
        • Video #2
          Link

In depth

How Did Christianity Come To Africa?

  1. Matthew
    • He got up and left for Egypt; And, out of Egypt I have called my son ( Matthew 2:15 )
    • Simon from Cyrene ( Acts 8:26-40 )
  2. Acts
    • Phillip
      • Ethiopian Eunuch
  3. Eastern Africa
    • Ethiopia
      • 330 AD
        • State Religion
    • Portuguese
      • 15th Century
      • Trade
        • When you are trading things, you are not only trading things, but trading ideas
      • Congo
  4. West Africa

Top 10 African Tribes Taken In The Atlantic Slave Trade

Tribe

  1. Chamba ( 10th )
    • Country
      • Nigeria
      • Cameroon
  2. Wolof ( 9th )
    • Country
      • Senegal
      • Gambia
      • Mauritania
    •  Religion
      • Islam
  3. Abron ( 8th )
    • Country
      • Ghana
  4. Fulani ( 7th )
    • Country
      • Senegal
      • Nigeria
      • Cameroon
    • From
      • Algeria
    • Religion
      • Islam
  5. Mande ( 6th )
    • Culture
      • Mandika
    • Country
      • Senegal
      • Nigeria
      • Cameroon
    • From
      • Sahara
    • Religion
      • Islam
  6. Fon (  5th )
    • Country
      • Benin
      • Dahomey
      • Nigeria
      • Togo
    • Years
      • 17th Century
    • Destination
      • Haiti
      • Trinidad
  7. Bakongo
    • Country
      • Central Africa
        • Congo
        • Angola
    • Years
      • 13th Century
    • Religion
      • Christianity
        • Via Portuguese Trade
        • We need
          • Priest
          • School Teachers
    • Destination
      • Brazil
  8. Igbo ( 3rd )
    • Country
      • Nigeria
    • Got caught up
      • “Aro” Confederacy
      • 14.6%
    • Religion
      • Christianity
  9. Yoruba ( 2nd )
    • Country
      • Nigeria
    • Got caught up
      • Oyo
      • 13%
    •  Religion
      • Christianity
    • Destination
      • Cuba
      • Brazil
    • Culture
      • Pantheon
        • Orisha
  10. Mbundu ( 1st )
    • Country
      • Angola
      • Congo
    • Religion
      • Christianity
    • Destination
      • Brazil
    • Culture
      • Martial Art

Cited

Wikipedia

Slavery in Angola

Link

In current day Angola, high levels of child trafficking, commercial sexual exploitation, pornography, forced labor, sexual slavery, and other forms of exploitation are reported, in part due to the civil war-caused break down of social structures and traditional security mechanisms active before independence. Angola is a source country for significant number of men, women and children trafficked for the purposes of forced labor or sexual exploitation. Children have been trafficked internally and also to Namibia and South Africa for the purposes of sexual exploitation and domestic and commercial labor. The Government of Angola does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

At present, it is estimated that over one million primary school age children are out of school, the majority of them being girls. There is a strong correlation between women’s education and the increased vulnerability of both mothers and children to a range of life-threatening conditions, including forced labour and prostitution.

Igbo people in the Atlantic slave trade

Link

  1. Ethnic groups were fairly saturated in certain parts of the Americas because of planters preferences for certain African peoples.The Igbo were dispersed to colonies such as Jamaica, Cuba, Haiti, Barbados, the colonies in the future United States, Belize, Trinidad and Tobago among others. Elements of Igbo culture can still be found in these places. In the United States the Igbo were commonly found in the states of Maryland and Virginia.
  2. The slave trade in this region really started to take off with the appearance of the first Portuguese Ships. There were multiple different ways that people were gathered or taken to be sold off to the Europeans. Most of the slaves that were taken were from the Igbo and the Ibibio peoples, as well as some of the smaller groups in the surrounding area. While some people were taken during raids and wars, it was not the most common way for people to become enslaves, contrary to popular belief. One of the more common ways for people to become enslaved were to be sold off. For example, if a thief was caught in a village, the person would be sold to the slave traders by the elders. The elders would then use the money for the betterment of the community. Another example is for people who were unfaithful to their spouse. Women who had committed adultery could be sold off by their husbands. Another common way to be brought into slavery was to be sold, or “pawned” to settle debts. Children were often used to settle these debts.Kidnapping is also a common way to be forced into slavery. Slave traders would often seek out children who were alone, or small groups of people who were traveling and ambush them. This forced people to have to travel in rather large, armed, groups to protect themselves. Although this is similar to war and raiding, it is at a much smaller scale. Children who were home alone while their parents were working were especially easy targets for the slave traders.

    Adults were the most common ones taken, amounting to roughly 85% of the total slave trade from this region, children only made up about 15%. The main reason for this was because adults were already capable of performing hard labor, and had better chances of surviving the grueling journey across the sea.

  3. Haiti
    • Some slaves arriving in Haiti included Igbo people who were considered suicidal and therefore unwanted by plantation owners. According to Adiele Afigbo there is still the Creole saying of Ibos pend’cor’a yo (the Ibo hang themselves).Aspects of Haitian culture that exhibit this can be seen in the Ibo loa, a Haitian loa (or deity) created by the Igbo in the Vodun religion.
  4. United States
    • In the 19th century the state of Virginia received around 37,000 slaves from Calabar of which 30,000 were Igbo according to Douglas B. Chambers. The Frontier Culture Museum of Virginia estimates around 38% of captives taken to Virginia were from the Bight of Biafra. Igbo peoples constituted the majority of enslaved Africans in Maryland. Chambers has been quoted saying “My research suggests that perhaps 60 percent of black Americans have at least one Igbo ancestor…”

References

  1. Wikipedia
    • Angola
      • Slavery in Angola
        Link
    • Igbo
      • Igbo people in the Atlantic slave trade
        Link

Parting Shots

“… Making me a product of Survival.” – HomeTeam History

Despite his questioning, he affirms his faith in Christianity, as seen in the penultimate sentence of his work that quotes the prophet Micah: “After all, what makes any event important, unless by its observation we become better and wiser, and learn ‘to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before God?'” – Olaudah Equiano ( Link )

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