Suleiman the Magnificent

Intro

Based on listening in on one of Robert Mawire’s video, decided to google on Suleiman.

Here are some of what I found:

  1. ISRAIR Airlines & Tourism
    Holy Sites in Jerusalem
    Link
    Throughout the history of Jerusalem, the Jewish, Christian and Muslim faiths have treasured the sacredness of the Holy Land and its Holy City Jerusalem. From the uniqueness of this City built on Seven Hills, each faith has flourished. Today’s visitor to the Holy City of Jerusalem delights in the passion and greatness of Israel’s capital awash with history, shrines holy to three faiths and relics of the past still very much alive today. The major shrines, the Wailing Wall, Temple Mount and Church of the Holy Sepulcher are highlights of each tourist’s experience. Ancient Jerusalem flourished in what today we call The Old City surrounded by its 465-year old wall. The wall has a total of 11 gates, but only seven are open – Jaffa, Zion, Dung, Loins (St. Stephen’s), Herod’s, Damascus (Shechem) and The New Gate. During the years 1536 – 1541, the Turkish sultan Suleiman built these walls. 
  2. Suleiman the Magnificent: Builder of Ottoman Jerusalem
    Link

    Suleiman commissioned the city wall overhaul in 1536 to protect Jerusalem’s perse inhabitants from a feared Crusader invasion. Although the European kingdoms had not launched a potent Crusade for several centuries by Suleiman’s time, the memory of successive Christian assaults on the Holy Land was still fresh in the minds of the region’s Muslim majority. Suleiman’s crenellated wall, over 40 feet in height, included over thirty towers and countless firing slits, all to provide ample defense from an invasion force that, ironically, never arrived. Seven gates, still open today, allowed access to every quarter of the newly fortified city.Suleiman, possessed of a remarkable religious tolerance for his time, also stressed the inclusion of the holy sites of all Jerusalem’s faiths within his city plan. When he learned that his architects had left Mount Zion, holy to the city’s Jews and Christians, outside the confines of the new wall, he had them executed (the sultan was somewhat less tolerant of failure). Under Suleiman’s benevolent rule, the revitalized Jerusalem flourished, the increased security and enforced religious tolerance sparking immigration to the city and an expansion of the mercantile economy. 

 

Videos

  1. Suleiman the Magnificent – I: Hero of All That Is – Extra History
    A young Suleiman ascends the throne of the Ottoman Empire. He wants to be a benevolent ruler, but he must prove that he is no pushover.
    Published on :- 2017-May-12th
    Link
  2. Suleiman the Magnificent – II: Master of the World – Extra History
    Knowing that most of Europe is preoccupied with internal struggles, Suleiman launches his wars against Hungary and Rhodes while they’re cut off from outside reinforcements.
    Published On:- 2016-May-19th
    Link
  3. Suleiman the Magnificent – III: Sultan of Sultans – Extra History
    The victorious Suleiman begins to consolidate his empire and his home. With Ibrahim and his favorite concubine, Roxelana, by his side, he reorganizes the empire and begins his great work: a book of laws. But Hungary still stands untaken, and he must have it
    Published On:- 2016-May-26th
    Link
  4. Suleiman the Magnificent – IV: The Shadow of God – Extra History
    When a dispute arose over the control of Hungary, Suleiman saw an opportunity to extend his empire into Europe and gain allies from those who’d asked for his help. Though he took Buda quickly, Vienna had time to fortify against him and pushed his troops back.
    Published On:- 2016-April-2nd
    Link
  5. Suleiman the Magnificent – V: Slave of God – Extra History
    Suleiman’s empire stretches across the Mediterranean, but in the midst of his success, he suspects betrayal in his own house. His best friend, Ibrahim, and his most promising son, Mustafa, both seem to have designs upon the throne.
    Published On:- 2016-April-2nd
    Link
  6. Suleiman the Magnificent – VI: Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques – Extra History
    Suleiman’s decisions came back to haunt him, starting with the Knights of Malta (once Rhodes). He tried to kick them off their island again, but failed. He launched a new campaign to take Vienna and prove the might of his empire. But he was so old…
    Published On:- 2016-April-2nd
    Link
  7. Suleiman the Magnificent – Lies – Extra History
    Suleiman lost faith in those who surrounded him, fearing that they schemed to replace him. Why do we so rarely see such destructive suspicion in our governments today? We also need to talk about what made the West dub Suleiman “Magnificent,” and the flourishing of arts and education which took place under his reign.
    Published On:- 2016-April-23rd
    Link

 

Indepth

Ibrahim

Executed Today – May 15, 2011
1536: Pargali Ibrahim Pasha, Suleiman the Magnificent’s friend and grand vizier
Link

On this date in 1536,* the Ottoman Empire’s mightiest Grand Vizier was strangled at the order of the Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent.

An Albanian [update: and/or Greek] Christian, Ibrahim Pasha — not to be confused with several other historical figures of that name, notably an Egyptian general — found his way into the Ottoman slave quarters and became a boyhood friend of the young Suleiman.

Thereafter the two would rise together: as Sultan, Suleiman rapidly promoted his trusted friend, and even married a sister to him.

So absolute was Ibrahim’s power that Italian diplomats** called him “Ibrahim the Magnificent”.
At the Ottomans’ acme, his word was law as surely as his distinguished master’s. Ibrahim’s achievements in war, diplomacy, and as a patron of the arts attested his worthiness of the honors.

References

  1. Ibrahim Pasha
    • 1536: Pargali Ibrahim Pasha, Suleiman the Magnificent’s friend and grand vizier
      Link

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